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Old 03-02-2012, 06:23 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
That sounds counter productive. I thought the point of panko was to have a crispy coating.
I think the point of the Panko was merely as a substitute for the bread often used in meatloaf recipes, not as any kind of coating.

Myself, I prefer wheat bread in my own meatloaf recipe (my mom's recipe). I prefer the bread in lumps instead of evenly dispersed throughout the loaf.

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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
For my Asian, chicken meatloaf, I add chopped onion, and peppers, some finely diced bok choy and celery, soy sauce, garlic, 5 spice powder, and ginger. It's great served up with sweet & sour sauce.
Have you posted or would you post the recipe? It sounds interesting and I'd love to try it.
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Old 03-02-2012, 06:56 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I think the point of the Panko was merely as a substitute for the bread often used in meatloaf recipes, not as any kind of coating.
...
Of course it isn't being a crispy coating, it's on the inside of the meatloaf. Why would you waste panko on that?
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Old 03-02-2012, 07:06 PM   #33
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Of course it isn't being a crispy coating, it's on the inside of the meatloaf. Why would you waste panko on that?
Well I couldn't agree with you more. You're right that the point of using Panko is that the product is intended to produce crispy coatings. Otherwise it's just crispy bread crumbs and by the time it's ran through the food processor it's just dry bread powder. Sounds unappealing to me.

I would rather just take a few slices of whole wheat bread, perhaps remove the crusts, then cube them and throw them into the loaf mix, then mash it all up by hand. Lumpy style meatloaf.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:20 PM   #34
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That sounds counter productive. I thought the point of panko was to have a crispy coating.
I used some in salmon patties inside as well as outside. (I was out of breadcrumbs.) It stayed soft inside and was crunchy on the outside. It worked like soft breadcrumbs. Who knew?
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Old 03-02-2012, 09:02 PM   #35
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I used some in salmon patties inside as well as outside. (I was out of breadcrumbs.) It stayed soft inside and was crunchy on the outside. It worked like soft breadcrumbs. Who knew?
But I thought panko was a fair bit more expensive that bread crumbs. What the heck would I know? I make my own whole grain bread crumbs.
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Old 03-02-2012, 09:54 PM   #36
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If Panko is all that's in the cupboard...I rarely buy loaves of bread anymore, just can't use them fast enough. I do keep Panko and other bread crumbs on hand. Any leftover home baked bread is fair game for garlicky croutons.
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Old 03-03-2012, 01:57 AM   #37
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But I thought panko was a fair bit more expensive that bread crumbs. What the heck would I know? I make my own whole grain bread crumbs.
AFAIK Panko is more expensive than bread crumbs, and package bread crumbs are more expensive than bread itself, or making your own crumbs. In fact it's funny that crumbs are what you have left over after the good bread is gone.

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If Panko is all that's in the cupboard...I rarely buy loaves of bread anymore, just can't use them fast enough. I do keep Panko and other bread crumbs on hand. Any leftover home baked bread is fair game for garlicky croutons.
Or when the good bread is getting old. I too make my own croutons out of almost any bread, particularly my home baked focaccia. I just cube it, toss it in garlic butter, then toss the result in grated Parmesan cheese and Italian type spices (S & P to taste), then lightly bake them just enough to drive the moisture out.

I buy Panko as a frying mix. Or Progresso Italian crumbs for my Chicken Parmesan.
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Old 03-03-2012, 02:18 AM   #38
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Because they don't sell bread by the slice, and I don't eat it very often, I buy a loaf, use what I need, then cube the rest or break it down to bread crumbs in the FP. The bread crumbs go into the freezer and the croutons go into the oven seasoned and then the freezer. I can't remember the last time I bought breadcrumbs.
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:08 AM   #39
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I don't use much breadcrumbs, so I'm used to having some on hand. Leftover bread gets cubed and used as filler for meatloaf.

Other fillers I use are leftover cornbread, stuffing mix, and seasoned croutons.

I'd probably use oatmeal, but the last time I tried it I guess I used too much, and didn't like the meatloaf, so I've never tried it again.

In case of the salmon patties, I used a little of the Panko because I was out of the seasoned breadcrumbs I normally keep on hand.

I liked that the Panko was unseasoned. If you didn't know it was there, you wouldn't have tasted it. I also didn't use egg to bind because it would have overpowered the salmon flavor. I used just enough mayo to hold the patties together.

I made the patties and dredged them in 1/2 chicken Shake n' Bake, 1/2 Panko (for a less salty taste). They were the most delicious and crunchy patties ever.
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Old 03-03-2012, 07:51 AM   #40
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I did a quick Google for that show segment. Ina's guest was Kevin Penner from 1770 House, his restaurant. They did indeed grind the panko and added milk, which he said togeher keep the loaf moist. Also added eggs. And something I've never done, which is to saute the onions before adding. I've always used the old Quaker Oats recipe, mostly from habit.

Chief Longwind's enthusiastic post makes me want to drop everything and go create a meatloaf. Thanks, Chief!
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