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Old 02-12-2014, 08:45 AM   #1
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ISO Metric equivalent of 'cup' weight

I'm never quite sure about this as a packed / loose amount will vary so I hope that some of you have a fail safe answer!
On this side of the pond we use metric and some of us who still use our tried and tested old recipe books ( And lovely old brass balance scales as I do ) also cope with Imperial measures.
As there are some super recipes from your good-selves as well it would be nice to know. I will then write out a table and paste it,....... the glue method not the computer one! inside my personal recipe folder for future use.
So, over to you...............

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Old 02-12-2014, 09:31 AM   #2
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A cup of what? A cup of chopped lettuce will weigh differently than a cup of flour. It is a volume measure, not weight or fluid. If you use an 8 ounce coffee cup to measure with you will have the best approximation.
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Old 02-12-2014, 09:46 AM   #3
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Fair question PF. I should have said that I was thinking of dry weight as in flour, sugar. Liquids arn't a problem. Not sure about butter. Any suggestions?
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Old 02-12-2014, 09:52 AM   #4
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Sorry. There is no tried and tested method. You would have to make a conversion chart of every food there is. Like PF said, a cup of Lima beans would weigh a lot more then a cup of whipped cream. And whipped cream would weigh differently than whipping cream in liquid form.

If you are looking at an American recipe, put your scales away. We don't weigh. We measure. Unless we are looking at an European recipe. Get yourself a very good set of American measuring cups and spoons. And BTW their is a difference in cups for liquid and dry measuring. We use a Pyrex cup for liquid measuring. That give measurements in your measures and ours in ounces and cups. I would suggest you get a two or more cup Pyrex cup.
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:00 AM   #5
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Fair question PF. I should have said that I was thinking of dry weight as in flour, sugar. Liquids arn't a problem. Not sure about butter. Any suggestions?
I don't know about in France, but our butter in sold in quarter pound sticks with tablespoon markings for cup and tablespoon measures. We get four sticks to a pound of butter, Two sticks equal one cup, Five and a half tablespoons equal 1/3 cup of butter. Four tablespoons equal 1/4 cup of butter. Two cups to a pound of butter. Our recipes reflect these measurements.
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:01 AM   #6
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Thanks Addie,
That sounds like a plan and I can get them online easily enough.
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:05 AM   #7
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Our sticks here are about 1/2 pound in weight ( 250gr ). I always thought you guys used a heck of a lot of butter LOL !! Now I know. Lucky I haven't tried THAT one before Eh?
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:16 AM   #8
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If you use American measurement instruments for American recipes, you can't fail. Since your butter is sold differently than yours, I would suggest you measure it out in the cups, or if your cutting skills are very good, cut down your butter to equal ours.

Or you might want to soften your butter, measure it according to our cup, wrap securely and freeze in one cup increments. It will save a lot of time in the end.
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:23 AM   #9
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Yep, That makes sense to me as well Addie. I think I'm getting the hang of this now.
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Old 02-12-2014, 11:11 AM   #10
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Quote:
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Fair question PF. I should have said that I was thinking of dry weight as in flour, sugar. Liquids arn't a problem. Not sure about butter. Any suggestions?
There is not even any set standard weight for a cup of flour. That changes by water content, and whether it's been sifted or not. That's why most bread recipes here either specify weight, and they give a starting point, then tell you to add 1 or 2 ounces at a time until the consistency of the dough is right. Recipes which specify cups of flour also give a rough starting point, then you add about 1/4 cup at a time. It takes some experience to know what is meant by "right". It's one of the reasons why a good baker is as much an artist as a cook.

Here is a link to a "Butter Converter" that seems to work okay. Converter link
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