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Old 09-09-2013, 12:46 PM   #1
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ISO tripe recipe

So I'm used to cooking hearts, liver, chicken giblets etc and this past weekend I cooked my first beef tongue which turned out to be absolutely delicious. The next thing will be tripe. I can easily get honeycomb tripe in my local supermarket but I was hoping that someone here might be able to provide a tried & trusted recipe / technique for getting the best out of it.... any experiences with this? Thanks!

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Old 09-09-2013, 01:01 PM   #2
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When I worked in an Italian restaurant, every Saturday in this town is Tripe
Day. Even today. The standard way of making it was to boil the whole tripe until fork tender. Remove and allow to cool to the touch. Cut into strips. In the meantime you should have a pot of your favorite marinara sauce ready. Place the strips of tripe in the marinara sauce and allow to simmer for at least one hour. Have on hand a loaf of crusty Italian or Artisan bread. Serve in a large soup bowl and sop up the leftover sauce with your crusty bread. Go back for seconds.

We had two size bowls for sale. The cereal bowl size and a large soup bowl. A lot of customers always ordered two large bowls at the same time. They wanted to make sure they got their share. We opened at 11 a.m. By 12:30 the pot was empty. And it didn't matter how much the cook made. Same story for every restaurant in town. Good luck!
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Old 09-09-2013, 01:05 PM   #3
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A friend from SA makes this:

Buseca

I've never tried it.
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Old 09-09-2013, 01:21 PM   #4
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I recommend Menudo, a traditional Mexican tripe soup. I have had success with this recipe, even though Mrs Hoot won't touch it.

Menudo
Ingredients
2 cups of dried hominy (drained) OR
1 large can of hominy (I prefer the hominy you find in the ethnic section of your grocery store)
2 lbs. pigs' feet (Split the long way. The meat dept. at your grocery store will do this if you ask them)
3 lbs. chopped honeycomb tripe (well cleaned in a couple of changes of water)
Water, as needed
1 tablespoon dried oregano
5 black peppercorns
5 chopped cloves garlic
2 roasted poblano chilies, seeded, peeled and chopped
1 roasted ancho chili, seeded, peeled and chopped
1 chopped onion

Instructions:
*Note: If you are using canned hominy, skip this step
1. Cover the hominy with water. Leave it to soak for at least eight hours or overnight. Transfer it to a saucepan and cover it with a few inches of water. Bring it to a boil, and then simmer it for two hours. Add more water if you need to, to keep the hominy covered.
2. Drain off the water, and then add the tripe, onion, oregano, pigs' feet, peppercorns and garlic. Add water to cover everything and bring the mixture to a boil. Simmer for two-three hours until the tripe and pig’s feet are tender, then add the chilies and simmer for one more hour.
Note: The pig’s feet will have bones, remove them if you wish.


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Old 09-09-2013, 01:24 PM   #5
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The great thing about tripe, it can be used in any base of the cook's choosing. It is great in a soup, or as the meat for a marinara sauce poured over pasta. But always needed is a crusty loaf of Artisan bread to slop up the goodness of the juices in the bottom of the bowl.
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrismcphee View Post
So I'm used to cooking hearts, liver, chicken giblets etc and this past weekend I cooked my first beef tongue which turned out to be absolutely delicious. The next thing will be tripe. I can easily get honeycomb tripe in my local supermarket but I was hoping that someone here might be able to provide a tried & trusted recipe / technique for getting the best out of it.... any experiences with this? Thanks!
I take it you're in England? With us, tripe comes already cooked - well, blanched, but you can eat it as it arrives from the shop. The only way I can take it is the honeycomb variety with (malt) vinegar and pepper as my grandmother used to serve it. I haven't had it for years.

I once made Jane Grigson's recipe for tripes a la mode de Caen. It was absolutely disgusting, despite the copious amounts of wine and brandy. It was a horrible slimy mess. I'm not fussy about food but I had to spit it out. I couldn't swallow it!

They do a dish in Lyons called (I kid you not!) "fireman's apron" ("tablier de sapeur"). It's a slab of blanched tripe (blanched by the supplier as it is in the UK) coated with egg and breadcrumbs and fried. I've never tried it.
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoot View Post
I recommend Menudo, a traditional Mexican tripe soup. I have had success with this recipe, even though Mrs Hoot won't touch it.

Menudo



I think I'm with Mrs Hoot on this one. It's the sliminess when tripe's cooked for hours that I can't take.
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:55 PM   #8
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I've had my share of tripe and both the texture and the taste are something I don't need to eat again.
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:43 PM   #9
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I'm not in England any more - transplanted to Ontario a decade ago, but i'm looking forward to going back to Bury market when i go back to visit my parents in a month's time.

From the various suggestions here, i think I'm going to have to go with Addie's marinara and bread. To be honest, it's probably the only way the rest of the household will even try it! Thanks for the advice.
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Old 09-09-2013, 09:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrismcphee View Post
I'm not in England any more - transplanted to Ontario a decade ago, but i'm looking forward to going back to Bury market when i go back to visit my parents in a month's time.

From the various suggestions here, i think I'm going to have to go with Addie's marinara and bread. To be honest, it's probably the only way the rest of the household will even try it! Thanks for the advice.
Enjoy it. Serve with a small helping of pasta on the side. Rigatoni or some other tubular pasta. Or you can put the marinara sauce over the pasta and make it the main dish. There will still be sauce at the end to sop up with the bread. Also a quick salad to go with the meal would be nice. And if there will be only adults, some Chianti wine would be a nice drink to go with the meal. It is immediately recognized from the basket it comes in. A nice extra touch.

Happy eating!
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