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Old 08-07-2007, 01:31 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
I never found it to be particularly expensive and, unfortunately, can't get it in my area any more.

It's been called the poor man's lobster and one of the ways I prepared it was to steam it for a few minutes and, then, put it under the broiler to just brown it a bit. I served it with garlic butter for dipping. Yum.
So itís not expensive? Interesting, and what you just described sounds incredible! Iíll have to look around and see if I can find some!
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Old 08-07-2007, 01:43 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
Foie Gras is pretty high on my list. Who came up with that anyway? I mean, I can see eating different animal parts, but foie gras has to go through a process.
OMG!

I knew Foie Gras was duck liver, but I never knew the particulars about it. Itís a fatty duck liver that achieves itís excess fat by a process of force feeding the ducks and geese. I had no idea........

Interestingly enough, Foie Gras was banned in Chicago earlier this year. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a bill in 2004 that will ban the production and sale of Foie Gras in California by 2012. Itís illegal to produce Foie Gras in Britain according to their animal welfare laws (although it can be imported), and the RSPCA is calling for a complete ban of it.

Wow......I had always though it was just liver.
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Old 08-07-2007, 01:44 PM   #23
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Yeah, weird huh?
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Old 08-07-2007, 01:51 PM   #24
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I'd say zebra is very unusual. No tbecause it is rearor available mostly in Africa, but because for the typoe of animal it is and the life it is living you'd think meat should be very tough, in fact zebra has very tender meat, as the metter of fact stakes are out of this world. Just ask anybody who went on saffari and hind and then ate zebra.
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Old 08-07-2007, 01:53 PM   #25
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Hey, I love foie! Goose is better though than duck (to me at least)
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:02 PM   #26
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My dh is from Turkey (he is Armenian, however) and the Armenians in Turkey make a dish called "Khash". It's quite unique and requires some getting used to, however, if you can get past the initial prejudices against, it can be tasty.

Khash

4 calves' hooves
6 lamb tongues
2 lbs. calve's tripe (stomach)
2 garlic cloves
Salt, pepper, paprika


Soak feet in boiling water to loosen the shoe, then take off the shoe from each foot. Singe all hairs and scrape off the rest with the edge of a knife. Wash everything very thoroughly. Soak the feet and stomach in water over-night. Each ingredient has to be cooked separately at first.
In a big kettle start cooking the feet with the garlic.
Cut stomach into one inch squares, cook 10 minutes, drain the water. Add fresh water and cook 15 minutes more. Then add to the feet and cook together for 2 hours. When meat separates from foot bones, remove all bones. Also take off scum when formed.
Cook tongues in water until skins can be pulled off easily. Cut up into small pieces. When the feet and stomach is half cooked add the pieces of tongue, and the salt and pepper.
When khash is cooked take off some of its fat into a small frying pan add the paprika and cook a few seconds until paprika is melted, then pour back into the khash. Serve the meat with its own broth in soup plates. Add lemon juice or vinegar when eating. Serves 6
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:13 PM   #27
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UGH....make that 20 cloves of garlic for me!
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:32 PM   #28
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Wow, I wonder how Khash tastes? Iíd try it!

I knew a guy long ago from the Philippines, and he told me about a holiday delicacy they used to prepare. It involved stuffing pigís lungs with the ground up heart, other offal meat, blood, and rice, then they sewed it to together and cooked it.

I couldnít find that recipe on the net, but I did find one for Blood Pudding or Sausage.
It looks innocent enough.....you could probably take a bite of this and not know what it was.


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Old 08-07-2007, 03:33 PM   #29
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Oops, it asked for meal and thought it was meat, sorry.

As far as Khash goes. Cow's feet that are sold here are pretty clean. I do not use any of the other goofy ingredients as the Armenians in the former Soviet Union do not either. Cow feet and shank meat. In the end it taste like realy really heavy soup. i love it. Now if you ask Ukrainians they will tell you not to stop there and put the stuff in refrigerator. Imagine eating jello that tasts like soup yum. I love it. But I do throw away the cow feet, brrr, yuk, I only keep shank meat, though I would love the tongues too, but it is too expensive, I'm just not have that kind of money. Strongly recomend.
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Old 08-07-2007, 03:42 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin
OMG!

I knew Foie Gras was duck liver, but I never knew the particulars about it. Itís a fatty duck liver that achieves itís excess fat by a process of force feeding the ducks and geese. I had no idea........

Interestingly enough, Foie Gras was banned in Chicago earlier this year. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a bill in 2004 that will ban the production and sale of Foie Gras in California by 2012. Itís illegal to produce Foie Gras in Britain according to their animal welfare laws (although it can be imported), and the RSPCA is calling for a complete ban of it.

Wow......I had always though it was just liver.
Don't be too alarmed. Ducks and geese naturally overeat in the fall to grow enough fat for their flight south. If you ever saw them being fed, you wouldn't call it "force!" They walk right up and love every minute!

I have not seen the procedure in the "feed lots," which I am sure is where they ram the stent down their necks to feed them, but if you saw the way "regular" grocery store chickens were raised, you would not eat them. I don't!
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