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Old 05-01-2014, 03:54 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I do it the other way 'round. I nuke and then roll. I'm sure my way is far better.

Sequence varies for me. I not noticed a difference, but then I may not be as perceptive as others.
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Old 05-01-2014, 04:02 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Sequence varies for me. I not noticed a difference, but then I may not be as perceptive as others.
I've noticed two things. It's easier to roll it after it's nuked. It gives a lot more juice than just rolling it.
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Old 05-01-2014, 05:03 PM   #23
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You guys are both wrong. You have to nuke AND roll simultaneously.
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Old 05-01-2014, 05:23 PM   #24
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You guys are both wrong. You have to nuke AND roll simultaneously.


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Old 05-01-2014, 05:24 PM   #25
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You guys are both wrong. You have to nuke AND roll simultaneously.
But you're not done until you've squeezed it with one of these! Nothing else will do.


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Old 05-01-2014, 07:20 PM   #26
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Is there a 'secret' to getting more juice from lemons and limes? Or am I just plagued with buying from stores that sell 'old' or non-juicy ones?

I see demos where the cook is squeezing a lemon and the juice just pours out! Admittedly I don't have the hand strength, but I do use a lemon squeezer.

The last limes I bought (and they weren't cheap) looked fine when cut open but didn't produce much juice.
Rolling the lemon, lime etc., on the work surface or chopping board before cutting it or warming it in the m/wave both help release the juice. There are various types of juicer. You pays your money and you takes your chance. I like the plastic glass or china ones like this
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or it's variants. I find it gets more juice out for less effort. I have an electric one but if you aren't careful they can over do it and the juice will be bitter from the pith.

Also when buying them choose the heaviest as these will have most juice and thin skinned lemons usually have more juice than the thick skinned ones. Avoid any with damaged skin.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:21 PM   #27
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But you're not done until you've squeezed it with one of these! Nothing else will do.


Not good if your hands are a bit arthritic.

Incidentally, if you only want a few drops of juice rather than a whole lemon's worth you don't have to sacrifice a whole lemon. Push the tines of a fork into the lemon (or lime, etc.,) and pull out. You can then squeeze what you want out of the holes and put the lemon in the 'fridge for next time.

Other tips -
-If you only want the juice you can peel the rind thinly (before squeezing out the juice) and freeze it for the next time you need it for flavouring.

-Seville (bitter) oranges for marmalade have a very short season in UK shops so I buy them when I see them and freeze them until I have time to make the marmalade. They loose a little pectin in the freezing but I get round it by adding an extra orange or the juice of a lemon.
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:32 AM   #28
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Moisture in all fruits is dependant on the moisture that the fruit body absorbs from the parent plant. In citrus, as with most fruit, there has to be a ballance to insure the best fruit quality. Too much water will dilute the fruit flavor, and in some fruits, and most berries, can damage the fruit. Too little water will create stunted growth, and a frier fruit.

One fruit is picked, there is no more water absorbed into the fruit. Ripening of fruits that do ripen after being picked, often makes the fruit juice more accessible. In most ripening processes, the fruit starches convert into sugar, which combines with the water, and produces a softer pulp. Think of the avocado. When underipe, it is hard, and has much less flavor. As it ripens, it develops a softer texture and more pronounced flavor. It does not get juicier. In fruits like plumbs, the inner meat, as the fruit becomes more ripe, begins to break down, releasing the natural juices contained withon the cell walls to float freely inside the skin. The fruit seems juicier, but still contains the same amount of water that it had wehn less ripe.

Your citrus will not get juicier if allowed to ripen. They will get sweeter, when ripened on the tree.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Just to clarify, avocado is one of those fruits that does not ripen on the tree.
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:34 AM   #29
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[QUOTE=Mad Cook;1360684]Not good if your hands are a bit arthritic.


Absolutely not---- or you have peripheral neuropathy or you're just plain ol' getting old and weak.


Quote:
Incidentally, if you only want a few drops of juice rather than a whole lemon's worth you don't have to sacrifice a whole lemon. Push the tines of a fork into the lemon (or lime, etc.,) and pull out. You can then squeeze what you want out of the holes and put the lemon in the 'fridge for next time.

Other tips -
-If you only want the juice you can peel the rind thinly (before squeezing out the juice) and freeze it for the next time you need it for flavouring
Thanks for those tips, MadCook.
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Old 05-02-2014, 01:37 PM   #30
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[QUOTE=cave76;1360750]
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Not good if your hands are a bit arthritic.

Absolutely not---- or you have peripheral neuropathy or you're just plain ol' getting old and weak.
I have my share of physical problems, including less hand strength and more stiffness, but this tool works great for me. You don't necessarily have to squeeze it with one hand; you can use both hands to press each handle, or set the bowl of the squeezer into a shallow bowl and just press down.

To each their own.
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