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Old 04-30-2014, 11:02 AM   #1
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Juice from limes and lemons

Is there a 'secret' to getting more juice from lemons and limes? Or am I just plagued with buying from stores that sell 'old' or non-juicy ones?

I see demos where the cook is squeezing a lemon and the juice just pours out! Admittedly I don't have the hand strength, but I do use a lemon squeezer.

The last limes I bought (and they weren't cheap) looked fine when cut open but didn't produce much juice.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:17 AM   #2
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To me, the "secret" is twofold.

First, you have to pick the right citrus. I look for lemons and limes that are somewhat thin-skinned, feel heavy, and have some give when squeezed. If it doesn't have any give, it means that the fruit isn't fully ripe and there won't be much juice. The key with limes is to choose fruit that has a yellowish tinge. Believe it or not, ripe limes are not bright green.

The second secret is exactly what you mention. I take the heel of my palm and roll the fruit on a cutting board while applying some pressure. This helps break down the cell membranes to release the juice.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:22 AM   #3
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What Steve said.

Also, after rolling the fruit, I pop them into the microwave for 10-20 seconds (10 for limes, 20 for lemons) the heating also helps release the juice.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:23 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
To me, the "secret" is twofold.

First, you have to pick the right citrus. I look for lemons and limes that are somewhat thin-skinned, feel heavy, and have some give when squeezed. If it doesn't have any give, it means that the fruit isn't fully ripe. The key with limes is to choose fruit that has a yellowish tinge. Believe it or not, ripe limes are not green.

The second secret is exactly what you mention. I take the heel of my palm and roll the fruit on a cutting board while applying some pressure. This helps break down the cell membranes to release the juice.
Thanks! About limes----- the stores that I buy at usually have nothing but bright green limes so that's part of the problem. Will they ripen more at home---- and produce more juice that way?

Same with lemons----- most of them have a thick skin (sigh) and are 'hard'. Rolling the the fruit might help. I'll try that.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:24 AM   #5
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What Steve said.

Also, after rolling the fruit, I pop them into the microwave for 10-20 seconds (10 for limes, 20 for lemons) the heating also helps release the juice.
Thanks! They won't explode in the MW, will they? Another trick from the experts gratefully received.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:28 AM   #6
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No, they won't. Just get them a little warm, do not incinerate.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:28 AM   #7
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No, they won't. Just get them a little warm, do not incinerate.
Thanks. Just had a thought----- I used to put a fruit (can't remember which one) in a paper sack with an apple. Supposedly the apple emits a type of gas that promotes ripening.

Would that, could that, possibly help?
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:37 AM   #8
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Thanks. Just had a thought----- I used to put a fruit (can't remember which one) in a paper sack with an apple. Supposedly the apple emits a type of gas that promotes ripening.

Would that, could that, possibly help?

I don't know it that rapid ripening trick works for citrus. Also, I don't think ripeness is always the problem with citrus juicing.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:38 AM   #9
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No, it won't. It's ethylene gas from apples you're thinking of; it can help ripen many fruits. But lemons and limes don't continue to ripen after they're picked.

Choosing the right ones, warming, rolling and using a squeezer - I use all of these methods to get the most juice. Sometimes they're just not very juicy.
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Old 04-30-2014, 11:45 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
Thanks! About limes----- the stores that I buy at usually have nothing but bright green limes so that's part of the problem. Will they ripen more at home---- and produce more juice that way?

Same with lemons----- most of them have a thick skin (sigh) and are 'hard'. Rolling the the fruit might help. I'll try that.
Unfortunately, I suspect a lot of stores buy slightly underripe fruit because it's brighter colored and looks prettier.

As mentioned above, once citrus is picked, it doesn't continue to ripen.
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