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Old 10-21-2005, 04:21 PM   #1
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Kangaroo

Hi,

Last week I bought some Kangaroo steak and not knowing what I was doing decided to fry it like a normal steak. It tasted horrible. Has anyone got some good ideas on how to make a tasty dish with kangaroo meat? I thought of a Goulash.... with onions and mushrooms?? But that cannt be all............... there must be more tasty dishes! Would be glad if you help me..

Thanks Susanne

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Old 10-21-2005, 05:43 PM   #2
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Kangaroo should be treated like venison.
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Old 10-22-2005, 01:57 AM   #3
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Kangaroo Meat

There are two different types of information that most sites quote from: and now I quote:-

" Kangaroo meat is best served rare or medium rare rather than well done.
Kangaroo is very low fat so take care not to over cook it. Preheat the oven, grill or pan before cooking. Quick cooking methods retain juiciness and flavour.
When roasting, pan frying or grilling, cover the meat with foil and rest for 5 -10 minutes after cooking. When not overcooked and rested after cooking, it is also juicy.
Prime cuts of kangaroo do not need marinating but cuts can be marinated in a mild acid marinade. If using a marinade, completely dry the meat surface before cooking.
- Add olive oil to a hot pan and sauté each kangaroo cutlet for approximately 2 minutes on each side. Leave to rest.
- 800 grams kangaroo leg meat, marinated in the refrigerator for 24 hours. Remove meat from the marinade, dry with paper towel and brown in hot oil. Transfer to a roasting pan, season with salt and pepper and roast for 20 minutes at 200 degrees centigrade. At the end of the cooking time, turn off the oven and allow the meat to stand for a further twenty minutes.
- Place fillets in very hot pan with 2 tblspn of olive oil and chopped garlic and cook for 2 - 3 minutes on each side. Leave to rest.
- 800 gram rump piece - Melt 2 oz butter in a smallish saucepan or sauté pan. Brown the meat on all sides. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour over 3 1/2 oz white wine and simmer gently for 20 minutes. Remove the meat to a warmed dish and cover, allowing it to rest for 20 minutes before slicing finely."

OR

"Firstly the meat should be soaked in oil for at least 15 min prior to cooking. It should then be placed in a very hot pan and quickly turned over to ensure all sides are 'seared', that is browned. This will seal the meat up to prevent moisture loss.
If pan frying the temperature can then be turned down a little and the cut cooked to medium rare. If roasting it can be transferred to the oven, but once again not cooked further than medium rare.
Guide to cooking times
* Stir Fry: (5mm thick) 1 minute maximum
* Kebabs: (1.5cm cubes) 2 minute per side (leave space between cubes)
* Medallions: Steaks (2.5cm thick) 2-3 minutes per side.
* Roasts: Brown in pan then cook in pre-heated oven for 8-12 minutes per 500gms at 220 degrees Celsius or 15-20 minutes at 200 degrees Celsius (thick roasts may take longer than thin regardless of weight). "

The strength of the taste of the animal depends upons lots of factors: how it was harvested, the age of the animal, how long from havresting to use {"gameness increases"}, the method of cooking, and what you like/expect.

Have another go at it - you may like it!
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Old 10-22-2005, 10:46 AM   #4
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Hi and thank you!

Thanks for the response but I just had to laugh when I read that it is fed to dogs. My stomach just went ............................! Believe it or not, it is sold as a delecacy here in Germany and Holland. Emu, yes a good idea, dont know where to get it, but have eaten many different meats when we were in South Afrika. I find crocodile and Rattle snake ok. Thanks also to all the info ref making Kangaroo meat and I will give it a go.

Susi
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Old 10-22-2005, 11:03 AM   #5
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Here in the US, there is a fast food chain called Hardee's. They have a tasty sandwich that is piled high with thinly sliced roast beef. When they first introduced it, the rumor went around that it was, in fact, kangarool meat.

If kanga meat is anything like venison, I agree with Auzzi. The age of the animal, how it is field dressed, and how long it has hung make a big difference in taste. I've heard many people say that venison is gamey and strong, but the ones my husband brings home are delicious! I prefer does to bucks, but the young bucks are fine if they are cleaned properly. One has to carefully cut out around the genital area to get the scent glands out, as if any of that gets on the meat, it makes it taste nasty. One also has to remove the silverskin...it takes a little extra time, but makes so much difference in the tenderness of the meat.
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Old 10-22-2005, 01:12 PM   #6
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Hi Constance,

I have just had my supper and now it wants to say hallo....................
Yuk, I have never had a buck to clean out............
I feel rather weezy............

Susi
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Old 10-22-2005, 06:52 PM   #7
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Kangaroo cooked correctly can be beautiful but it mustn't be overcooked. They serve it at restaurants here and DH and my oldest daughter love it. A friend makes spaghetti bolognaise using roo mince as its less fat.
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Old 10-22-2005, 07:14 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Susi
Hi Constance,

I have just had my supper and now it wants to say hallo....................
Yuk, I have never had a buck to clean out............
I feel rather weezy............

Susi
Sorry, Susi.

The men do the the field dressing...it's a man thing.

HB brings home big chunks of meat...whole loins and hams, mostly...and cuts them into appropriate sizes for cooking. Then I do all the fine trimming...removing fat (what little there is, is nasty), and the silverskin. By the time I get done with it, it looks like something you'd buy on sight from your favorite butcher. We put it in ziplocks, press out all the air, seal, wrap again in foil, then label and freeze.

All this sounds like great free meat, but guess what! After all the hunting equipment, licenses and fees, it probably costs $15-$20 a pound, so I'm for sure going to make the best of it!
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Old 10-22-2005, 10:21 PM   #9
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youre lucky you get to eat things like that in australia like snake and kangaroo and stuff. im very picky but recently ive been willing to try new foods (like frogs legs! o_O!) id like to try new things like that. btw, since youre from australia, can you tell me what sheila refers to? i know it means young lady, but is it sort of an insult or slang or something?
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Old 10-22-2005, 11:54 PM   #10
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Its old fashioned slang which just means a woman people don't really say it much here anymore!
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