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Old 02-03-2015, 10:27 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Annageckos View Post
Moussaka looks good, I'll have to give that a try sometime. I haven't seen ground lamb around here, but I have a meat grinder so I can always make my own.
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Try this recipe, Moussaka Recipe - NYT Cooking , it's adapted from the book "Taste" by David Rosengarten. It's become our favorite. BTW, before we got the meat grinder, I'd either ask the guys working in the meat dept at the grocery to grind some lamb for me or, if I didn't have time to wait, I'd chunk it, put in freezer for a few minutes and then use the food processor to grind it. Probably still would for such a small amount instead of dragging grinder out and then having to clean.
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Old 02-03-2015, 11:57 AM   #12
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Lamb is wonderful and can pretty much be treated the same way as beef. My only suggestion is, whatever you decide, don't over cook it.
My particular choice with lamb is that it should be pink. However, until fairly recently that wasn't the usual way over here but the influence of television chefs have altered that.

I was once served a lamb chop rare in France. Thereby hangs a tale but it was delicious!
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Old 02-03-2015, 12:08 PM   #13
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If you also like eggplant, you might like Moussaka. Don't forget the Tzatziki to go with it!
I used to find that moussaka was too greasy for me due to the oil absorbed when the aubergine/egg plant was fried. Then a friend's mother, herself Greek, told me to paint a little olive oil on both sides of the slices of aubergine and grill/broil them.

She also made the sauce for the top of the moussaka with a mixture of yoghourt and egg beaten together rather than the béchamel often given in a lot of recipes.

She said that both things are authentic so that's how I do it now.
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Old 02-03-2015, 01:21 PM   #14
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I used to find that moussaka was too greasy for me due to the oil absorbed when the aubergine/egg plant was fried. Then a friend's mother, herself Greek, told me to paint a little olive oil on both sides of the slices of aubergine and grill/broil them.

She also made the sauce for the top of the moussaka with a mixture of yoghourt and egg beaten together rather than the béchamel often given in a lot of recipes.

She said that both things are authentic so that's how I do it now.
You should try the link I posted above. The whole eggplant is roasted, cooled, sliced and then lightly fried in some olive oil. There's nothing TOO much about it, not too much oil, too much tomato sauce, or too much béchamel. I usually peel the skin off after frying because something in eggplant makes me itchy if I have too much of it and taking the skin off seems to help, plus I'm not really fond of the texture of the skin.

I do try to use mizithra cheese though when I can get it instead of pecorino romano but it doesn't really make that much of a difference, especially if you've never had the mizithra before.
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Old 02-03-2015, 02:59 PM   #15
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Though lamb and rabbit bot wonderful, I'd be careful with goat.
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Old 02-03-2015, 02:59 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
My particular choice with lamb is that it should be pink. However, until fairly recently that wasn't the usual way over here but the influence of television chefs have altered that.

I was once served a lamb chop rare in France. Thereby hangs a tale but it was delicious!
I love my meat rare, that is how I did the lamb the first time. I really don't like anything above medium rare. I hate cooking for people who want their steak well done. I can't bring myself to do that.
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:14 PM   #17
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I like lamb chops with dill sauce. My take on Swedish lamb with dill. I don't add cream or the egg yolk to the sauce. I make lamb stock in advance and that is where the veggies go. If the company for which I develop recipes decides not to use my take on this classic Swedish recipe, I will share it.


As Steve said, it can be treated like beef. I pulled a package of stew meat out of the freezer on Sunday. My plan was to put it in my Norwegian Sailor's Stew. Oops! I pulled out lamb stew meat. I had a bunch of veggies I had to use up, so threw together a quick stir fry. I trimmed the fat off the meat (which is when I realized it was lamb...), marinated it in my usual stirfry marinade (soy-oyster sauce-agave syrup-grated ginger-garlic-hot mustard-green onions) for about 10 minutes. The DH doesn't like lamb. He kept telling me how good it was...it wasn't until he'd finished his 2nd helping that I told him the meat was lamb, not beef.


The only way I'll eat lamb is on the rare side of medium rare.
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Old 02-04-2015, 12:45 AM   #18
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I've always loved lamb. My mother roasted a leg of lamb several times a year. For whatever reason, it's hard to find in the grocery stores any more, at least to find any decent selection. I used to really like the shoulder blade chops, and all I did was broil them, no marinades. Like a good steak, I like the flavor unadulterated. The arm chops with the round bone were usually too chewy to just broil them, and the regular chops were so pricey for 2 bites of meat that I had trouble justifying them.

These days, I only have lamb when I find it on a restaurant menu. My wife doesn't like it, and the difficulty of finding good cuts at an affordable price just makes it unattractive. Some day though I'm going to find a good lamb haunch and roast it up - I'll eat the whole thing if I have to.

This Moody Blues song always makes me hungry:

Lazy day, Sunday afternoon,
Like to get your feet up watch TV,
Sunday roast is something good to eat,
Must be lamb today 'cause beef was last week.
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Old 02-04-2015, 01:00 AM   #19
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This cracked me up, RP! I picture you sitting there eating your lamb haunch, like a Fred Flintstone meatsickle.

I like the tiny lamb chops. Best I've ever had was in Dominican Republic at a resort.
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:36 AM   #20
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....For whatever reason, it's hard to find in the grocery stores any more, at least to find any decent selection.
I love leg of lamb, too. We usually buy ours from a farm over in Wisconsin once a year. But the down side is that we only get one leg when we buy that way (we buy half a lamb, and the front leg is used for shoulder and foreshank cuts). I usually save that leg for Easter. The rest of the time, I buy it at Sam's Club. They sell New Zealand lamb that's 100% grass fed, and I've found the flavor to be very good.
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