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Old 05-13-2010, 03:42 PM   #1
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Liquid to egg ratio for quiche? I'm baffled

I would like to make a quiche - this is my first. I've researched and reviewed several recipes, but one thing that confounds me is the ratio of egg to liquid (half and half, cream). I have seen some as little as 1/3 cup per egg, and some as much as a cup per egg (deep dish).

Who knows the ins and outs? Will cream or half and half produce a better quiche? How does the addition of the liquid help the quiche?

Also, I've seen people say to brush the crust with eggwhites and blind bake to keep it crispy - is this a good practice?

Thanks!

Geoff

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Old 05-13-2010, 03:47 PM   #2
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I'd say less cream makes the filling firmer. So, I think the ratio is a matter of whether you like you filling firm or soft.
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Old 05-13-2010, 03:50 PM   #3
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Oh, I missed the last bit.

Yeah, I generally blind bake pie crusts, because it gives them a less soggy texture. The brushing with egg white also seems like a good idea, because it would reduce the amount of liquid that goes into the base, and keep it crispier.
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Old 05-13-2010, 04:04 PM   #4
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that's what i would have thought, since quiche is usually creamy and eggs, like fritattas, are a little tougher.

Thanks!
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Old 05-13-2010, 04:21 PM   #5
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As you say, with never having made one, and several hundred recipes for baking a quiche available... I would think you could forget the liquid/egg ratio, pick a recipe and go with it. I wouldn't make it more difficult than it is.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:50 PM   #6
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The recipe I looked at called for 6 eggs to 1 cup of milk, and 1/2 to 1 cup of grated cheese. Then you go from there.

If I were you, I would blind bake the crust. I've had soggy crust on custard pies (which is what a quiche is), and it's terrible.
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Old 05-16-2010, 10:49 AM   #7
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1 egg will just barely set 1 cup of liquid; 6 eggs per cup would be approaching scrambled egg consistency. 1 egg per cup might be workable for an individual serving, pot pie sized quiche, but i can`t imagine how you'd be able to slice a normal sized quiche and not have it fall apart.

i generally use from 4 to 6 eggs for a quiche of about 12 or 13 inches across and filled to about a 1 1/2 inch depth. i use about 2 to 2 1/2 cups liquid.

as far as liquids go, cream will give you a very rich, but heavier quiche. 1/2 & 1\2 is probably more commonly used. personally, i prefer a lighter quiche, and generally use plain, non-fat yogurt for a sour-cream-like tart flavor and slightly reduced fat content.

i don't bake my crusts first.

good luck with your quiche!
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