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Old 06-13-2011, 02:03 AM   #1
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Making Mac 'n Cheese same way as Alfredo?

The way you make fettuccine alfredo is
1. heat up butter and heavy cream
2. cook pasta
3. place shredded parmisan in a bowl
4. pour hot cream mixture on to the cheese and let rest
5. pour in hot pasta
6. place more cheese on top
7. stir and the sauce will thicken

I'm thinking if mac n cheese can be cooked the same way without having to bake it?
1. heat up butter and milk (no heavy cream at home, but cheddar melts better than parmisan so milk should be fine)
2. cook pasta
3. place shredded cheddar in a bowl
4. pour hot milk mixture on to the cheese and let rest
5. pour in hot pasta
6. place more cheese on top
7. stir and the sauce will thicken

I have seen many recipes online calling for flour to make a roux, but I don't think it's necessary right?

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Old 06-13-2011, 04:51 AM   #2
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I never use flour or a roux for mac & cheese. I melt the cheese in some milk or a cream of chicken (or celery) soup. The only reason that I bake it afterwards is to get some crunch to the top.
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Old 06-13-2011, 05:54 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
The way you make fettuccine alfredo is
1. heat up butter and heavy cream
2. cook pasta
3. place shredded parmisan in a bowl
4. pour hot cream mixture on to the cheese and let rest
5. pour in hot pasta
6. place more cheese on top
7. stir and the sauce will thicken

I have seen many recipes online calling for flour to make a roux, but I don't think it's necessary right?
That's not the normal way to make Fettuccine Alfredo.

The butter, cream and Parmesan cheese are all heated up and thickened together in a pot or deep skillet before adding the cooked pasta which is then lightly tossed, usually with a pair of tongs, not stirred, which may break up the pasta. The person being served can then add more Parmesan cheese if they choose.

Sometimes I'll even add a little pasta water before adding the sauce.

As for your Mac & Cheese, it may take more than just pre-heated milk to melt your cheddar. You will will probably have to add it to the pot while heating the milk and butter. Cheddar has a higher melting point than Parmesan, and I think you'll need more cheddar than the amount of Parmesan you used for the Alfredo for the same volume of milk.

Even though I could, I don't make a roux. I do, however, use a cheese blend of cheddar, Pepper Jack, and Colby - but that's just personal taste.
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
That's not the normal way to make Fettuccine Alfredo.

The butter, cream and Parmesan cheese are all heated up and thickened together in a pot or deep skillet before adding the cooked pasta which is then lightly tossed, usually with a pair of tongs, not stirred, which may break up the pasta. The person being served can then add more Parmesan cheese if they choose.

Sometimes I'll even add a little pasta water before adding the sauce.

As for your Mac & Cheese, it may take more than just pre-heated milk to melt your cheddar. You will will probably have to add it to the pot while heating the milk and butter. Cheddar has a higher melting point than Parmesan, and I think you'll need more cheddar than the amount of Parmesan you used for the Alfredo for the same volume of milk.

Even though I could, I don't make a roux. I do, however, use a cheese blend of cheddar, Pepper Jack, and Colby - but that's just personal taste.
it is the way they do it in the restaurant. they keep everything separate, and finish cooking on the table right in front of you
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:39 AM   #5
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That's not the way I make alfredo either, but if it is a method you are used to, it's worth a try to see if it works for your mac & cheese.
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:47 AM   #6
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I never make a roux for my macNcheese. I cook the noodles. While they're cooking, I shred the cheeses (I use whatever I've got Cheddar, American, Cream cheese, Swiss Provolone, Colby Jack,) When the noodles are done I drain them then add butter and milk to the pot with the noodles in the colander. Melt butter and warm milk, add cheeses and get them mostly melted then add the noodles back in and stir until everything is melted and well mixed. I can adjust the milk and cheese consistency then and add more milk or cheese as needed. I do always use cream cheese since I find it gives it that creamy texture we like. I don't bake it at all.
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:58 AM   #7
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Hi Hyperion.

I use a modified version of Alton Brown's Stove Top Mac & Cheese.

Here's the link to his recipe.

Stove Top Mac-n-Cheese Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network

As you can see if the recipe it's pretty much the same prep work as Alfredo pasta.
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:05 AM   #8
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I tried his baked mac n cheese before lol but I don't like having onion in it... just doesn't taste cheesy enough
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:11 AM   #9
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Actually, the sauce for Fettuccine Alfredo is stirred into the hot pasta after it is cooked. Italians say it is not really a sauce, because it is not made separately. And you cannot buy the sauce in a jar. (You CAN buy A sauce CALLED "Alfredo Sauce," but really, there is no such thing.)

Baked Macaroni and Cheese traditionally does start with a roux, and becomes either a bechamel or a veloute, depending on whether you use milk (bechamel) or chicken stock (veloute) before stirring in some grated cheese.
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:12 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Actually, the sauce for Fettuccine Alfredo is stirred into the hot pasta after it is cooked. Italians say it is not really a sauce, because it is not made separately. And you cannot buy the sauce in a jar. (You CAN buy A sauce CALLED "Alfredo Sauce," but really, there is no such thing.)

Baked Macaroni and Cheese traditionally does start with a roux, and becomes either a bechamel or a veloute, depending on whether you use milk (bechamel) or chicken stock (veloute) before stirring in some grated cheese.
That's with the Onion dotted with Cloves correct ChefJune?
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