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Old 05-03-2006, 10:34 AM   #11
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Roberto, isn't cotechino a type of sausage that is used for the Capod'anno dinner? (new years eve) Or maybe guessing how some of them are sold, lower portion of pigs leg, more of a toe?

That is one of the few ways (with the parsley and garlic sauce) I actually enjoy beef. On the contrary we usually use lean portion, could be a little on a tougher side but we pressure cook it well (or could be stewed, too I imagine) and make it real tender, too the point they just turn flaky. It is indeed very delicious even if you are not much of a meat eater
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Old 05-03-2006, 10:43 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Roberto, isn't cotechino a type of sausage that is used for the Capod'anno dinner? (new years eve)
Yes, it is.... Minced pig meat, rolled in the pig skin. Or, with the same filling, you can have the real leg (ahead) of the pig, filled (It is "zampone" (=big foot)
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Old 05-03-2006, 11:27 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by bethzaring
In order to provide our bodies with 100% of the nutrients it needs every day, there is no room for any foods that do not provide nourishment.


Wow, we are a whole-foods, very healthy family, and even I don't have quite that attitude.

I love parsley, but can find organic parsley in the market down the street. In limited spaces, it wouldn't be an herb I plant. It's always nice to know the nutritional value of what we put in our bodies, though. I guess I just think there is room for indulgence at times.
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Old 05-03-2006, 12:53 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDG
Pesto is a genoese sauce for pasta, jus as written by urmaniac. I spent my young holydays in Liguria, near Genova, for more than forty years.....
The recipe DOES'nt use parsley. Only basil. And the cheese is pecorino: just a bit more tasty than parmesan.
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Thank you RDG for the proper instruction. Maybe I should call my pesto, Beth's pesto type product. I love recipes for cooking but rarely follow them literally. I use pesto recipes for guidelines and then use ingredients I have in stock.
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Old 05-03-2006, 01:16 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by velochic


Originally Posted by bethzaring
In order to provide our bodies with 100% of the nutrients it needs every day, there is no room for any foods that do not provide nourishment

Wow, we are a whole-foods, very healthy family, and even I don't have quite that attitude.

I love parsley, but can find organic parsley in the market down the street. In limited spaces, it wouldn't be an herb I plant. It's always nice to know the nutritional value of what we put in our bodies, though. I guess I just think there is room for indulgence at times.
Hi Velochic, thanks for the comment and I must respond.....Indulge I do, regularly, check out my recipe for chocolate chip cookies

The statement, In order to provide our bodies with 100% of the nutrients it needs every day, there is no room for any foods that do not provide nourishment, is a fact. I have studied nutrition, with trepidation. I was coming from a nuts and berries, organic, whole grains type background into a traditional study of science and I did not know if it would work. But it did quite well. All my gut level beliefs, such as white flour should not be consumed, eggs are an excellent food, butter is better than fake fats, whole grains are the only way to eat grains, milk is necessary for humans every day of their lives.....all these things were taught in the traditional classes. But what really blew me away was to learn that if every day we first consumed all the nutrients our bodies need to do their jobs properly, we would not be hungry for any more food that day. Or to put it another way, everytime we eat junk we are displacing an opportunity to eat a nutrient dense food and that oportunity is lost forever. We can only eat so much food any given day and we short change ourselves nutritionally if we replace a needed nutrient dense food with a junk food.
But I am excellent at rationalization.......I bake all the cookies, brownies cheesecakes and other desserts that I eat, but I make them with all whole wheat flour. So when I eat junk, at least it is whole grain junk, I get a tiny bit of nutrition even in my chocolate chip cookies. Oh.... do I induldge!
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Old 05-03-2006, 04:14 PM   #16
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If you want to make your pesto more nutritious (and more tasty IMO), use arugula as the base.
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Old 05-03-2006, 06:05 PM   #17
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Arugula pesto is definitely an acquired taste - lol!!!

That said, I adore pesto & make it throughout the basil-growing season. For those of you who want a source of unbelievably fresh & unbelievably reasonably priced pine nuts, please do purchase from here:

http://www.pinenut.com/order-products.htm

So far above the creepy overpriced stuff in the supermarkets.
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Old 05-03-2006, 06:10 PM   #18
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I only use pine-nuts in my version of pesto. Is this not authentic? It's how I was taught on a cookery course I took in Liguria, many years ago.
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Old 05-03-2006, 07:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
I've seen that not every one has started their vegetable and herbs plants yet, so thought I would put in a plug for parsley.

When I make pesto, I use equal amounts of basil and parsley leaves, mainly to get the nutritional boost from the parsley. Parsley is high in vitamins and minerals, esp iron. I usually have 6 basil and at least 6 parsley plants in the garden. I also can tomato sauce and juice with fresh parsley and basil, as well as other fresh vegetables.
Beth, you are a girl after my own heart! I always do the same, although I'm having trouble finding parsley plants thiis year. I guess I should have started my own.
I don't can anymore, but I usually freeze some tomato sauce with parsley, basil, etc. I also puree fresh Italian Parsley, put in a small ziplock, mash it out flat, and seal. When you need it for sauce or soup, all you have to do is set it out for about 5 minutes, break off what you need, and put back in the freezer. I assure you this a safe practice.
You should try roasting some of your tomatoes in the oven! I think I have a recipe on here someplace for oven roasted tomatoes. They make a fantastic tomato sauce.
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Old 05-04-2006, 08:08 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Constance
You should try roasting some of your tomatoes in the oven! I think I have a recipe on here someplace for oven roasted tomatoes. They make a fantastic tomato sauce.
Hi Constance!, Thanks for the comments. I am not familiar with roasting tomatoes in the oven, I will search for your recipe. I am clueless as to how to do this! Do you use this sauce fresh, for freezing, are they individually roasted or already in a sauce form???

Beth
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