"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-23-2014, 08:59 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Since I don't eat bread very often, I'm not much help here. I tend to nibble on fruit, veggies, nuts, and cheese cubes at my desk. Have you looked at any of these:

DIY Deli Meats: 9 Recipes to Make at Home | The Kitchn
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2014, 09:29 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Going off at a tangent, I like to serve tzatziki with rollmops. It's a bit of a geographical stretch but I really think they go together.

As for the herrings I sometimes buy them ready made but I've been using this Delia Smith recipe which came from the original Cookery Course, for many years.

Soused Herrings - Herring - Recipes - from Delia Online

Not authentically rollmops but very good. Home-made lunchfish, in fact. They keep well if you follow the recipe exactly but obviously you shouldn't keep them in the 'fridge indefinitely.

NB I sometimes use cider vinegar but make sure it's the "real McCoy" and has an acidity level of at least 5% and has no additives (including metabisulphite).
I have never heard of rollmops before, so I had to look it up. Now my beloved tzatzikii is tainted by the idea of serving it with pickled fish. Uck.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2014, 08:04 PM   #13
Cupcake
 
Kathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mid-Atlantic, USA
Posts: 2,315
What great ideas!

Kayelle, I'll check out Steve's recipe. I'll also share that the Anova sous vide has been used far more than we thought it would be. The meats from it are simply delicious!

MC, I am really picky about hams and I LOVE bacon. So I am intrigued by what you did in salting them. Is there a link or could you elaborate?

CWS, add lettuce wraps! With the right filling, they are better than sandwiches! I saw that link. Before I run there, I want to know about Aunt Bea's bologna...or pickle/olive loaf!

GG, I'm standing in line with you for the rollmops!

StormyNight, I had a pony with your name. :) Yes, she was born on a stormy night. I cannot wait to hear what kind of lunch meat you try!

My update on the turkey breast is this:
When I make it again, I won't slice up so much at one time because I believe that we compromised the quality as air could reach the meat faster by slicing up too much.

I will make it again. The meat is moist, delicious, and tender. Plus, no tummy-crummies.

~Kathleen

__________________
A little bit Ginger. A little bit Mary Ann.
Kathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2014, 09:45 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,894
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I sometimes make a Scandinavian cold cut called "rullepølse". I bet that would work really well sous vide. I posted the recipe and instructions a few years ago. Rullepølse - Danish spiced meat roll
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2014, 03:12 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 8,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathleen View Post
...My update on the turkey breast is this:...The meat is moist, delicious, and tender. Plus, no tummy-crummies.

~Kathleen

AND it was delicious! WinWin! Happy to hear it.
__________________
... nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have... ~~~ LeBron James
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2014, 09:11 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathleen View Post
What great ideas!

MC, I am really picky about hams and I LOVE bacon. So I am intrigued by what you did in salting them. Is there a link or could you elaborate?
I used Jane Grigson's "Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery" which is very comprehensive. It was originally published in 1969 but there is a newer version ("used" for 1 penny on Amazon UK! Dearer on Amazon.com) She concentrates on salting, etc for preservation purposes as well as flavour so you aren't looking at salting something overnight. I used the wet brine method but she also covers dry salting IIRC. Lots of lovely recipes for pates and terrines, sausages as well as hams etc.,

J G is one of my favourite food writers as she's tried everything she puts in her books (unlike some!!). I looked for a link with recipes but couldn't find one.

I still have the book but it's in one of the boxes I haven't excavated yet.

If you'r interested here's a link to North American Amazon:

Amazon.com: jane grigson charcutery & french pork cooking: Books

The cheapest copy is "Used" at $11.39 but I think, from the description, that "The Art of Making Sausages" at $4.40 + post & packaging is more of less the same book.

They are sent from UK. I don't know if you have to pay customs duty on second hand books entering the US. I've bought several used books that have been sent from the USA and I haven'e had to pay duty but I don't know what happens in the other direction.

She uses saltpetre which you may be unable to get in the US. It's very difficult to get hold of nowadays over here because of its use in explosives. The weird thing is I have extreme difficult in buying 15ml in a pharmacy but can buy a kilo of the stuff on Amazon, no questions asked! You could probably adapt it to the salting compounds that I've seen on Amazon. Possibly you'd need to contact the manufacturers. Apart from being a preservative in it's own right saltpetre gives the nice pinkish colour that you'd expect from salted meat products - grey bacon doesn't look very appetising.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2014, 09:32 AM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,894
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I used Jane Grigson's "Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery" which is very comprehensive. It was originally published in 1969 but there is a newer version ("used" for 1 penny on Amazon UK! Dearer on Amazon.com) She concentrates on salting, etc for preservation purposes as well as flavour so you aren't looking at salting something overnight. I used the wet brine method but she also covers dry salting IIRC. Lots of lovely recipes for pates and terrines, sausages as well as hams etc.,

J G is one of my favourite food writers as she's tried everything she puts in her books (unlike some!!). I looked for a link with recipes but couldn't find one.

I still have the book but it's in one of the boxes I haven't excavated yet.

If you'r interested here's a link to North American Amazon:

Amazon.com: jane grigson charcutery & french pork cooking: Books

The cheapest copy is "Used" at $11.39 but I think, from the description, that "The Art of Making Sausages" at $4.40 + post & packaging is more of less the same book.

They are sent from UK. I don't know if you have to pay customs duty on second hand books entering the US. I've bought several used books that have been sent from the USA and I haven'e had to pay duty but I don't know what happens in the other direction.

She uses saltpetre which you may be unable to get in the US. It's very difficult to get hold of nowadays over here because of its use in explosives. The weird thing is I have extreme difficult in buying 15ml in a pharmacy but can buy a kilo of the stuff on Amazon, no questions asked! You could probably adapt it to the salting compounds that I've seen on Amazon. Possibly you'd need to contact the manufacturers. Apart from being a preservative in it's own right saltpetre gives the nice pinkish colour that you'd expect from salted meat products - grey bacon doesn't look very appetising.
I don't know if straight saltpetre is available in North America. I believe most North Americans use curing salt, also known as pink salt. It has NaCl and sodium nitrite. Some versions also have sodium nitrate. Curing salt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Apparently saltpetre can be potassium nitrate or sodium nitrate. Saltpeter (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2014, 02:04 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I don't know if straight saltpetre is available in North America. I believe most North Americans use curing salt, also known as pink salt. It has NaCl and sodium nitrite. Some versions also have sodium nitrate. Curing salt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Apparently saltpetre can be potassium nitrate or sodium nitrate. Saltpeter (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yes, pink salt is what I meant but couldn't remember what it was called. As I say, the book was originally published in 1969 and domestic salters had to mix their own salt and s/petre plus sugar and all sorts of things in the pickle depending on what you were doing. Back then curing mixes where only available to the trade in huge containers. S/petre these days seems to be mainly potassium based rather than sodium based.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2014, 02:46 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
I've just found the following on Google. It purports to be a JG recipe. As I can't get at my books I can't check. It's more or less the one I use to use.

Jane Grigson's English Brine Ingredients:
7 pt Water
1 1/2 lb Sea or coarse salt
1 lb Dark brown sugar
2 oz Saltpeter
1 Bayleaf
1 Sprig thyme
10 Juniper berries; crushed
10 Peppercorns; crushed
________________________________________
Jane Grigson's English Brine Instructions:

Boil hard for 5 minutes and skim any murky froth off the top.. Leave to cool.

Clean crock or bucket and lid with soda dissolved in boiling water,
rinse well, and leave to DRAIN dry.

Pour in cold brine, though a scalded muslin lined strainer.

Immerse the meat (duck, pork, beef, mutton) and keep it below the
surface by laying a piece of boiled wood, or scrupulously clean plate on
top.

Cover and keep in a dry place at a temperature below 60°F Salting time.

This depends on the thickness of the meat.

Trotters, 24 hrs, a leg of pork can take 10 days.

NB. Joints required for roasting rather than boiling will be improved by a
12 hour soak in brine, without tasting too salty afterwards.

In home conditions, in a cool larder, meat can be kept in brine for up
to a fortnight or three weeks, sometimes longer.

The moments islands of white mould begin to float on the surface, remove
meat and throw away the brine.

The crock will need washing in boiling soda again. The meat will be OK.

Recipe from "Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery" - Jane Grigson


I would think you could use kosher salt if sea salt isn't available. Just don't use salt with additives.

I used to do mine in October/November and keep the crock in the enclosed unheated porch to keep it cool. You might need to rethink this if you have a very hard winter.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2014, 08:23 PM   #20
Cupcake
 
Kathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mid-Atlantic, USA
Posts: 2,315
Thanks for all of the great ideas! I have reading to do this weekend!

Bacon, Scandinavian cold cuts, homemade bologna. Where to go next???
__________________

__________________
A little bit Ginger. A little bit Mary Ann.
Kathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
lunch, meat

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.