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Old 01-23-2009, 05:04 AM   #1
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Maldon sea salt/kosher salt - are they the same?

Has anyone regularily used Maldon Sea Salt and kosher salt? Are they the same thing in terms of volume / density / cooking properties? If I have a US recipe that uses kosher salt can I use Maldon instead? I've been reading up on kosher salt and it sounds like Maldon. I don't want to source kosher salt here in the UK to find out it's the same as something I use all the time. Thanks.

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Old 01-23-2009, 08:44 AM   #2
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Kosher salt is just plain sodium chloride. Different brands are ground more or less finely.

Sea salt is the same sodium chloride with some other minerals also found in seawater. The difference will be in how you measure. Becuase the grain size may be different between the two, a tablespoon of one may contain more or less than a tablespoon of the other.

Also, the sea salt can have a slightly different taste due to the other minerals it contains.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:25 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitmonster View Post
Has anyone regularily used Maldon Sea Salt and kosher salt?
Yes.
Quote:
Are they the same thing in terms of volume / density / cooking properties?
No. Kosher salt is a "cooking salt", and Maldon Sea Salt is considered a "finishing" salt. That is to say, One does not add it INTO a recipe, but adds it at the end, for the finish AND the texture.
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If I have a US recipe that uses kosher salt can I use Maldon instead? I've been reading up on kosher salt and it sounds like Maldon. I don't want to source kosher salt here in the UK to find out it's the same as something I use all the time. Thanks.
I don't know any cooks or chefs in US who use Maldon Sea Salt as a "regular" salt ( and I know a lot who use it).
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Old 01-23-2009, 12:44 PM   #4
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Interesting. I think the texture and density are similar but the chemical components are different.

I use Maldon as my default salt - always have done. I guess it's more of a luxury item in the US.

I'll do some experimenting and see what works best instead of kosher salt.
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:05 PM   #5
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VERY much a luxury item!
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:15 PM   #6
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- thanks June
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitmonster View Post
Interesting. I think the texture and density are similar but the chemical components are different.

I use Maldon as my default salt - always have done. I guess it's more of a luxury item in the US.

I'll do some experimenting and see what works best instead of kosher salt.

All salts have almost the exact same chemical composition = NaCl.

Sea salts have very, very small (trace) amounts of minerals from the sea -- unique to where they are harvested.

Table salt usually has iodine and anticaking agents added.

Kosher salt is used in the process of koshering meats. It's usually additive-free. It's the preferred salt for most culinary uses.

Maldon sea salt is harvested by hand and it's production is limited. It's very expensive, as salts go. I'm sure it's cheaper in England than it is in the rest of the world, but still, because there isn't vey much of it, I imagine it's probably pricey there too. Supply and demand and all.

Here it's probably $12 a pound (and sold in much smaller quantities), compared to Diamond Crystal Kosher salt which is more like $1 a pound.
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Old 01-24-2009, 07:29 AM   #8
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I have no other salt but Maldon in my kitchen. As I live in the UK it is cheap though. I just much prefer the milder taste. I use kosher salt when in the US. To show how good Maldon is though, try a simple test. Wet your finger and dab a small amount of regular iodized salt on to your tongue. Swallow and you will get an unpleasant burning sensation in the back of your throat. Now drink some water to cleanse your palate and try the same with Maldon. The difference is remarkable and helps to illustrate the price differential.
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