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Old 02-05-2010, 11:16 PM   #11
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I always pat meats dry before grilling. If nothing else, the oil used in a marinade will drip down onto the fire and cause flare-ups that make controlled grilling difficult.
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Old 02-11-2010, 09:51 PM   #12
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Pat the meat dry before grilling it. Otherwise it will steam. Then, baste more marinade if you like as it's cooking.
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Old 02-12-2010, 09:08 AM   #13
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how about when u pat i dry but kinda save the marinade liquid for brushing???i do this most of the time..i brush the marinade unto the meat to keep it moist and flavorful:)
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Old 02-12-2010, 09:12 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by mexican mama View Post
how about when u pat i dry but kinda save the marinade liquid for brushing???i do this most of the time..i brush the marinade unto the meat to keep it moist and flavorful:)
That's only OK if you cook the meat with the marinade on it or bring the marinade to a boil before using it. Remember, the marinade had raw meat in it.
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Old 02-12-2010, 09:34 AM   #15
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You should try dry brining sometime GW. It will change your life.
Timeout GB! I believe you have committed a grave infraction here. You mentioned a great tip without further instructions! Is there another thread about it?

I've always wanted to try a wet brine, and never heard of a dry brine.
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Old 02-17-2010, 07:30 AM   #16
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LOL sorry vagriller. Let me try to redeem myself. A dry brine is one of the easiest ways to get flavor into your meat. Here is how it is done. It is going to sound a little counter intuitive and will go against what you have have been taught about before, but stick with me and by the end you will be a believer.

To dry brine, take your meat (I have only ever done it with steak) and liberally coat it on both sides with salt. Use a little more than you think you should. Now wrap the meat tightly in plastic wrap and let it sit in the fridge overnight. Now I am sure at this point you are thinking that does not make sense because the salt will draw moisture out of the steak. Well that is correct and that would be a bad thing if we cooked the meat right away. Because we are letting it sit longer a little bit of magic happens. The juices do get drawn out, but then they mix with and dissolve the salt and then because of osmosis those salty juices are sucked back into the meat. The end result is that the meat is now seasoned with the salty meat juices from the inside out, as opposed to just being seasoned on the surface. Your steak will be full of flavor and juice. Try it and see what you think.
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Old 02-17-2010, 08:02 AM   #17
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While I'm not specifically on a low sodium diet, I do try to be aware of the amount of salt I take in other than merely using a salt shaker. And granted that salt is a very effective flavor enhancer, I wonder if your dry brining method would also be effective with much less salt but using herbs such as garlic powder and onion powder and paprika? I realize "brine" means salt, but what I'm questioning is the required amount, and the substitution of other "dry elements" to draw out the moisture and begin the process.
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Old 02-17-2010, 08:07 AM   #18
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I am not sure if ingredients other than salt would draw out the moisture, but I am sure you could cut down on the salt and add in other powdered flavorings. I bet that would work quite well.

The amount of salt I was talking about in my brine is not a ton, just a little more than you would think you would need.
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Old 02-17-2010, 08:51 AM   #19
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LOL sorry vagriller. Let me try to redeem myself. A dry brine is one of the easiest ways to get flavor into your meat. Here is how it is done. It is going to sound a little counter intuitive and will go against what you have have been taught about before, but stick with me and by the end you will be a believer.

To dry brine, take your meat (I have only ever done it with steak) and liberally coat it on both sides with salt. Use a little more than you think you should. Now wrap the meat tightly in plastic wrap and let it sit in the fridge overnight. Now I am sure at this point you are thinking that does not make sense because the salt will draw moisture out of the steak. Well that is correct and that would be a bad thing if we cooked the meat right away. Because we are letting it sit longer a little bit of magic happens. The juices do get drawn out, but then they mix with and dissolve the salt and then because of osmosis those salty juices are sucked back into the meat. The end result is that the meat is now seasoned with the salty meat juices from the inside out, as opposed to just being seasoned on the surface. Your steak will be full of flavor and juice. Try it and see what you think.
Thanks GB, you are redeemed! And I will try that for sure next time I make steak. I grilled steak on Valentine's Day, and the next day I re-heated some leftover in the CI skillet. The sear it put on the steak in such a short time made me want to try it in the skillet from the get go. When you consider that the salt is distributed throughout the meat rather than just the surface, it might be easier to think about using more. So this should work for chicken too?
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:43 AM   #20
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I have never used it for chicken, but theoretically it should work I think.
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