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Old 09-13-2011, 08:49 AM   #1
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Marinating/breading question

I like to make different foods and follow the recipe as closely as possible. Lately I've had no inspiration, or direction for this endeavor, until recently someone gave me the idea of making a food that the city of the opposing team "my" NFL team was playing that day is noted for. This kind of personal challenge is right up my alley, so last Sunday it was Cincinnati Chili. And this upcoming week it's going to be a Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich... or two

So I found this great blog site with detailed instructions and it had me wondering on their methods. And that is what leads to my thread.

They call for flour to be added to the marinade, which I've never heard of, and the pounded tenderloin to be take directly from the marinade and placed into my crumbs of choice. No dry-wet-dry.

As a recent thread indicated, the dry-wet-dry method is pretty popular by most here. And it's the method I use. It will seem wrong to deviate from something that works for me, but skipping a step apparently works for the owner of the site I was on. Maybe it's the flour that is in the overnight marinade that somehow works its magic? Has anyone here ever heard of adding flour to a marinade? I'm sure I could take the meat, dredge it in flour, put back in the marinade, then dredge it in my crumbs, but that would be deviating from the original recipe and possibly adding an unnecessary step. And as mentioned, I like to follow a recipe the first time I make something.

I'm just looking for some thoughts on adding flour to a marinade and going right from a marinade into the finished crumbs. As both of these are new to me. Has anyone here ever done this?
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:08 AM   #2
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I can't answer your questions, but I can say good on you for taking up that feller's challenge... :
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:25 AM   #3
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Quote:
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I can't answer your questions, but I can say good on you for taking up that feller's challenge... :
Yeah, that was a good idea that feller came up with
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:09 AM   #4
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I've never heard of putting flour in a marinade. It seems counter intuitive as the flour would thicken the marinade making it less effective.

Maybe this direct method gives your finished coating s different texture that's important to the authenticity.

On the other hand, maybe the recipe sucks. Have you checked other versions of this recipe for consistency?
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:31 AM   #5
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Hey, I knew someone would come along with some input

I briefly looked at other recipes, but this was the one I decided on. It's very detailed. And there's pics! I love a recipe with the actual outcome shown.
I'll follow it, but like you confirmed, flour in a marinade? If you haven't heard of it, I'll accept it's not a common practice. I'll be the DC guinea pig.

Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich Tutorials
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:09 AM   #6
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I'll be the DC guinea pig.
Don't you know you've always been our ? It's a compliment. I can count on you to be omnivorous not just with food but also ideas. I *snort snort* pork tenderloin sandwiches! Good luck.

I've never heard of flour in a marinade either, but have noted that some bottles in supermarkets labeled "marinade" are thickened with starch ingredients.
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:21 AM   #7
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Back in the 70s and early 80s, there was a fast food joint (not a big chain) that featured breaded and deep fried pork sandwiches. Oh my they were good. The place disappeared and the sandwich with it.

I still remember it fondly.
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:29 AM   #8
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I've never heard of a breaded pork sandwich before. It should be good with the tenderizing and marinating. I know I love breaded chicken sandwiches. I just need to make a concerted effort to locate a plain tenderloin before the weekend. I've got loin chops in the freezer, but I want the real deal and most of the tenderloins I've seen at the two stores I shop at only carry those marinated Hormel ones.
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:49 AM   #9
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Maybe you could buy the marinated ones and skip the marinating step... Not authentic but an option if you can't find a plain tenderloin.

On a side note, I remember seeing a food show where these sandwiches were featured. My memory may not be accurate but the restaurant they visited used pork loin pounded thin and breaded. I don't recall if this was an Indianapolis or Indiana location.
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:58 AM   #10
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If you viewed the site, pork loin is a viable substitute. I'm still going to try to find the tenderloin though.
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