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Old 08-16-2010, 08:43 PM   #1
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Mason jars vs Tupperware

Buying a kitchen for college. Am I better off getting mason jars instead of tupperware? I saw a bunch at WalMart for $5 for a case, in a bunch of sizes. I plan on making a few homemade things (balsamic reduction, sauces, etc) as well as storing leftovers. Kind of new to this.

What do you guys use?

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Old 08-16-2010, 08:47 PM   #2
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Buy yourself some of the disposable Ziploc containers. That way you can reuse them as often as you like and if, by some horrible mischance, you accidentally shove something to the back of the fridge and it rots you can toss it with a clear conscience!
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:49 PM   #3
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Buy yourself some of the disposable Ziploc containers. That way you can reuse them as often as you like and if, by some horrible mischance, you accidentally shove something to the back of the fridge and it rots you can toss it with a clear conscience!
I agree, Ziplocks are marvellous. Lighter, too.
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Old 08-16-2010, 09:18 PM   #4
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Mason jars and Tupperware are used for different things. Mason jars are used for canning (airtight just once). Tupperware is used for an airtight seal that can be opened and closed over and over.

The Ziplock suggestion is a good one, especially if you are on a budget.
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Old 08-16-2010, 09:27 PM   #5
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Over in the UK here, Tupperware is quite expensive. Very nice, though. But I find for preseving food, Mason jars are handy because they will stack.

Incidentally, masons can be transformed into quite pretty garden lights...




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Old 08-16-2010, 09:37 PM   #6
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The cheaper copies of plastic containers like Ziploc are not that durable. I've had the covers break the first or 2nd time I've used them. I agree they're not expensive, but they also aren't durable.

We grew up reusing mayonnaise jars. However, I'm a Tupperware girl mysef.
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Old 08-17-2010, 02:41 AM   #7
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I'm not really into canning foods, more like keeping fresh herbs fresh for longer; storing sauces, raw ingredients, chicken stock, lemon and garlic; and leftovers.

Obviously I can't stuff pasta or chicken into a jar, so I'd need some sort of tupperware-shaped container. I know Pyrex makes a glass "tupperware" set. Maybe this should be a "glass vs plastic" thread?
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Old 08-17-2010, 06:04 AM   #8
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GoGrey..., Since the advent of the microwave oven, lots of plastics, whether they are Tupperware or supermarket specials are great kitchen storers and cookware. As GB has already pointed out, Mason jars are for canning.
My advice is plastics, but be aware that you are buying a name sometimes, and that cheaper versions are just as servicable. eg., Some years ago I bought a gadget called "Pappa's Hand" from my supermarket for minimal $$ which I still use regularly. It chops, mixes, spins salads, is great for making mayo as it has a drip well. I paid AU$8.99 for it. A few weeks ago, I saw a Tupperware exact clone which is priced at $AU$79.95.
Goodness me!!!
Am not knocking Tupperware as they have some great ideas, and I love my 'rissole" press and storer which I've used for years as I also do my cake storers etc.
But look around. If you are looking for freezer storage to microwave, think those packs of takeaway type plastic containers. They come is various sizes, are airtight, are dishwasher and microwave safe and are as cheap as chips.
A warning! the decent ones have symbols that indicate whether they really are dishwasher and microwave safe. Even some Tupperware is not safe for microwave. But they tell you that when you buy it - or should.
AND!! Don't forget silicone cookware. What a fabuluous invention:)) No more cakes, meatloaves stuck to the bottom of the pan. It even folds up so you can store it in your drawers:))
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Old 08-19-2010, 08:49 AM   #9
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I store lots of things in mason jars--leftover soup or stew, dried beans and rice and pasta, herbs--as well as using them for canning. They are convenient, reusable, cheap, and resealable, and they last forever, or until you drop them onto the slab of marble you use for a trivet. :)

They are glass and heatproof, no worries about migrating plastic molecules, so you can reheat your soup or stew in the microwave.

AND, they come in all sizes, from 4 ounces to quarts to the occasional half gallon picked up in a thrift shop.
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Old 08-21-2010, 11:49 AM   #10
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I store lots of things in mason jars--leftover soup or stew, dried beans and rice and pasta, herbs--as well as using them for canning. They are convenient, reusable, cheap, and resealable, and they last forever, or until you drop them onto the slab of marble you use for a trivet. :)

They are glass and heatproof, no worries about migrating plastic molecules, so you can reheat your soup or stew in the microwave.

AND, they come in all sizes, from 4 ounces to quarts to the occasional half gallon picked up in a thrift shop.

I agree. We are virtually plastic- (and paper-) free in our house. I use mason jars for many different things other than canning. What doesn't go into jars, goes into glass. Yes, the lids are plastic, but I do my best to keep the food from touching it.
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