"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-07-2016, 02:41 PM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Bury St Edmunds
Posts: 20
Thanks, I might give that a try then.
I just find it amazing that with the water barely even simmering, the bowl about 2 inches from the water so it's basically just steam heating the bowl and it taking sooo long to melt, how can I possibly still be overheating it? My mother usually melts it in simmering water with the bowl touching the water and even she can't do it now. That must have been much hotter than it is now.

It's just baffling. I started to think it was the cream but then I couldn't scientifically thing of a reason why that would be a problem either.
__________________

__________________
S7ewie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 02:43 PM   #12
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Use the microwave! Put the chocolate in a bowl and heat it at 10 second intervals until it is melted.
This is what I do and it works fantastic!
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 03:50 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by S7ewie View Post
Thanks, I might give that a try then.
I just find it amazing that with the water barely even simmering, the bowl about 2 inches from the water so it's basically just steam heating the bowl and it taking sooo long to melt, how can I possibly still be overheating it? My mother usually melts it in simmering water with the bowl touching the water and even she can't do it now. That must have been much hotter than it is now.

It's just baffling. I started to think it was the cream but then I couldn't scientifically thing of a reason why that would be a problem either.
Water turns to steam when it boils at 212F, so it can't ever get hotter than that. Simmering water is about 205. The steam is a little hotter, but not much in this scenario. When the chocolate stays at a high temperature for too long, it breaks.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 03:56 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Bury St Edmunds
Posts: 20
Well I guess I didn't mean actual "steam", just the heat coming off of it. During the 3rd and 4th attempt the water wasn't even simmering really .. It was just "hot". It took a long time to even start to melt. To be honest I wasn't really tracking the clock, but it must have been around 10 mins from start to scrambled egg. Im just utterly mind blown how I could have possibly overheated it. If anything to me it seemed like it wasn't hot enough :/ especially considering I've done it before with the water touching the bowl.
__________________
S7ewie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 03:58 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,109
This link will give you much more specific information. How To Temper Chocolate, How To Melt Chocolate, Guidelines For Tempering Chocolate, Whats Cooking America
It talks about tempering chocolate, and melting chocolate (further down the page).

Quote:
Always melt chocolate slowly, at a low temperature. The melting point of chocolate is between 86 F. (30 C) and 90 F. (32 C), lower than body temperature. Using high heat is very risky and the most common cause of grainy and/or lumpy chocolate. Chocolate melts better and faster when using lower temperatures. Never let the temperature of your chocolate get above 115 F. Milk and white chocolates, which are more heat sensitive, should not be heated above 110 F. Use an instant-read thermometer to check the chocolate's temperature while melting.
S7ewie, I have confidence you can do this. As you can imagine, the 212F steam or even the residual warmth of the boiling water, is almost twice what is needed to melt the chocolate. It looks like white chocolate is even more sensitive than dark, so a patient gentle touch is needed.
__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 05:26 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Water turns to steam when it boils at 212F, so it can't ever get hotter than that. Simmering water is about 205. The steam is a little hotter, but not much in this scenario. When the chocolate stays at a high temperature for too long, it breaks.
Chocolate melts at human body temperature, about 98 degrees F. Don't know what that is in centigrade. To temper chocolate, you bring it to no more than 112' F, then remove it from the heat and stir the molten chocolate until it dips back down to 98' or so. It aligns the sugar molecules and gives you that crisp chocolate that melts so smoothly in you mouth.

If you get chocolate much over 110 degrees, then it will break and give you grainy chocolate that has separated in the way you describe. the idea of heating just the cream (again to no more than around 110, and pouring it over the chocolate sitting in a seperate bowl just works. Both white and brown chocolates derive their textures from cocoa butter mixed with the solids. The cocoa butter is the fat that hardens in chocolate. Some cheaper chocolates add other fats, such as coconut, or palm. Some even add paraphin wax to the chocolate.

For melting chocolate, look for couverture chocolate. It must be tempered if you are making candy. but since what you are making is a ganache, it can simply be melted in the ratios given in your recipe. Candy bars are very expensive for a lesser quality. The melting buttons and cocolate chips are made with vegetable fats rather than cocoa butter. The baker's chocolates are grainy by nature and are great to use as a flavoring, but not for melting into a silky-smooth ganache. Look up chocolate grades on the internet. There is a wealth of info out there. There are also great sites for purchasing premium couverture chocolate when you want to make something sublime.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 05:37 PM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Bury St Edmunds
Posts: 20
Thanks for the reply. I like the scientific answers :D

I'm just finding it hard to believe I overheated it after trying 4 separate times and each time being more careful. The instructions on the pack imply that, with the method I was using, it should take about 4 minutes. Well it took more than that before it was even half melted. And I've melted chocolate before a lot less carefully without any issues.

I'm wondering if maybe the cream was still a little too cold and this wasn't allowing it to melt very quickly?

Still .. If this kind of separation is only ever related to overheating then I guess that's what I must be doing. Just seems strange .. Maybe I'll try heating the cream or using the microwave method.

Thanks for all the contributions :)
__________________
S7ewie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 05:47 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 8,241
One quick question: is this the same chocolate brand you have used in the past? If it's a different kind, that could be the problem.
__________________
... nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have... ~~~ LeBron James
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 06:00 PM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Bury St Edmunds
Posts: 20
Yeah it's the same brand of cooking chocolate. But we tried with a different brand in the fourth test to be sure.

Just realised 110 Fahrenheit is only 43 Celsius which really isn't very hot at all .. A simmer is technically too hot .. So I guess it is very possible that but leaving it on the heat for too long it built up to go above that heat..
__________________
S7ewie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2016, 06:51 AM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
First, remember that white chocolate is not true chocolate. It is cocoa butter and sugar, with powdered milk and flavorings added. Therefore it can be trickier to melt than dark chocolate. Heat is its enemy. Large pieces do not melt well.

You will get better results if you chop or grate it into small pieces. If the recipe calls for milk, use the milk to melt the cocoa butter gently. Use the same technique you would for making ganache. Put the chopped chocolate into a small bowl. Heat the milk until it's hot, but not boiling. Pour the hot milk over the chopped chocolate and let it stand for a minute or two to soften the chocolate. Then stir it gently until smooth.

If the recipe does not call for milk, use the microwave, but do so gently. TURN THE POWER LEVEL DOWN to below 50%. Nuke it for 20 seconds, then stir. Repeat until smooth. As it gets close to being melted, shorten to 10 or 15 seconds at a time.

Skip the double boiler entirely.
__________________

__________________
In our house, dog hair is a condiment!
OMG! I decided to blog!
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chocolate

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.