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Old 04-11-2012, 12:48 AM   #1
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Moist Chicken - Help

Does anyone know any secrets to really bring out the moisture in chicken and other fowls? I just HATE dry chicken, turkey, duck etc.

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Old 04-11-2012, 01:07 AM   #2
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Welcome!

Best way to bring out the inherent natural juices in bird, is don't overcook it. A Simple herb rubbed, well salted/seasoned bird can be a real think of beauty.

There are plenty of marinades, brines, and techniques to help render a tasty, juicy bird, but it still boils down to don't overcook it. Pull the bird at 160 degrees, and just like steaks and what not, let it rest before you carve into it. Cary over cooking will bump up the internal 165 you want, and just(again) let it rest.

just my $.02

I am sure folks will chime in, lots to be learned here. Welcome to DC.
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Old 04-11-2012, 06:19 AM   #3
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@ Tonks,

Welcome Aboard ...

I am in agreement with Tattrat and I have never had a dry roast chicken or turkey ...

Here are other suggestions that work for me;

to cover the roasting bird with aluminum foil for the 1st stage of roasting to provide a moist environment to roast the interior of the bird, and then, to golden brown the exterior skin, with a higher heat at the 2nd stage with the traditional basting process ...

Also, basting the bird in its pan juices is another method employed.

Kind regards and good luck with your roasted chicken ...

Margi Cintrano.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:29 AM   #4
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Thank you both of you. I will turn to you guys when I'm next cooking bird.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:36 AM   #5
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Brining is another method to insure moist birds. I even brine pieces for the grill. This method also works with lean pork cuts on the grill. Yum, beer brined pork chops.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:54 AM   #6
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Have you ever tried roasting bags? It works most definitely. Over here, I can either get roasting bags or a roll of wrap - cellophane type stuff which you twist at the ends and it seals the bird in a nice juicy bag. It still browns but it stays wonderfully moist.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:38 AM   #7
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Three things that will do the trick.

1. Don't overcook. Overcooking is why poultry is dry. Especially white meat, which is the leanest.

2. Brining will add flavor and moisture to the poultry. It also gives you some leeway if you overcook.

3. Buy a digital instant read thermometer so you know when it's done.
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Old 04-11-2012, 10:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
Have you ever tried roasting bags? It works most definitely. Over here, I can either get roasting bags or a roll of wrap - cellophane type stuff which you twist at the ends and it seals the bird in a nice juicy bag. It still browns but it stays wonderfully moist.
I use the wrap for other thing Quintuplets, would you believe toaster bags are not common in the US.
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:41 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
Have you ever tried roasting bags? It works most definitely. Over here, I can either get roasting bags or a roll of wrap - cellophane type stuff which you twist at the ends and it seals the bird in a nice juicy bag. It still browns but it stays wonderfully moist.
I thought I had already made a post asking how you get the skin crisp. Must be losing my mind!

My brother used a "Brown in Bag" for a turkey one year. He followed the directions to the letter (Ex-Naval Flight Instructor) and ended up with a totally collapsed bird. LOL
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:45 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Three things that will do the trick.

1. Don't overcook. Overcooking is why poultry is dry. Especially white meat, which is the leanest.

2. Brining will add flavor and moisture to the poultry. It also gives you some leeway if you overcook.

3. Buy a digital instant read thermometer so you know when it's done.

I agree on all counts.

And will add that the quality of the poultry matters, too. I'll never buy Perdue or store brand again.

We brined and grilled a Bell and Evans chicken last night and it was SODALICIOUS!!
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