"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-20-2015, 09:00 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Craig, you wouldn't want to see it whole. It's incredibly ugly

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=an...%3B1600%3B1200

Link not for the faint-hearted! It has its own little fishing rod to catch its supper
I know what it looks like. I was referring to my personal refusal to buy fish parts without seeing what the assembled, whole version looks like. That old freshness obsession I have.
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 09:19 AM   #12
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,614
Quote:
Originally Posted by menumaker View Post
I think that monkfish works best cooked in a sauce. In fact that is what is on the menu tonight. I have steamed some sliced bulb fennel and incorporated that in a white sauce with mixed peppercorns, chopped a few of the fennel leaves and salt to taste. Later I will add the monkfish and cook it in the oven 180c for about 30mins. Serving with mashed potato. I have also made Korma curry with monkfish and that works really well as the fish holds its shape and is delicate in flavor. Makes a nice change from chicken.
This suggests, as I suspected, that the fish is bland i.e. if it works best with a sauce.

Have never understood using fish in a curry since the delicate flavour of fish is surely overpowered by the spices? I realise though that the texture of monkfish would stand up well to this treatment though.
__________________

__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 09:22 AM   #13
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I've been cooking Monk fish since it was cheap and often used as a sneaky substitute for Dublin Bay prawns (langoustines) for cheap pub basket meals (ie 30-35 years) and I have NEVER seen a recipe or read an article that suggested salting/brining it. What I will say is, that unlike many fish, small is not best. With monk fish the larger fish are more tasty it will be. Look for French recipes for cooking monk fish or "lotte" which is the French name for it.

Jane Grigson in her "Fish Cookery" suggests serving it hot with a cream sauce, hollandaise or tomato based sauces or cold with mayo. She has several French recipes such as Lotte a l'Americaine (or Amoricaine, ie Brittany, depending on where you think the recipe comes from), Lotte en Brochette (grilled on skewers with smoked bacon and a piece of bay leaf between them) and "Tourte Béarnaise a la Lotte" which is a quiche sort o dish.

I tried all of these in the days when the angler fish was a curiosity on the slab serving as a window decoration that no-one could possibly want to eat. The fishmonger thought I'd completely lost it when I asked to buy the "tail"! He practically gave it to me. I think it was something like 50 pence for the whole thing minus the head which I drew the line at. Can't afford it now it's so fashionable it's priced itself out of my pocket.

Incidentally, anyone who is or wishes to become a food and cooking genius should have Jane Grgsons books. She was unrivalled and still is in her approach to food and cooking it. The books make fascinating reading even when you aren't cooking.
Thanks for this detailed post. Helpful. The context/reason for salting is given as ridding it of its excess water content (implying it would have a better flavour). I baked it (without this salting procedure) with some butter and it did produce a lot of liquid but of course this was not wasted. I was very disappointed since I had been expecting a strong flavour....not at all the case! I dislike the close (almost grisly) texture of it so, unless I find here (in a future post) that salting it does indeed improve the flavour, will not bother with it.

Yes I delved into Grigson's cook books decades ago. Fish is her forte.
__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 09:54 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,127
Wouldn't salting and drawing out the liquid prior to cooking make it even more "gristly"? Especially since it's already firm and chewy to start. Sounds like MC's methods would be better.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 11:39 AM   #15
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I know what it looks like. I was referring to my personal refusal to buy fish parts without seeing what the assembled, whole version looks like. That old freshness obsession I have.
It's nice that you have that option. If I was that selective, I'd never be able to eat fish, and that would be a shame. A great many people live far from the seashore, yet we somehow manage to survive by eating fish that has usually been flash frozen shortly after being unloaded on the mother ship of the fleet and shipped that way to the markets which are our only resource for seafood.

Even while I lived in the Bahamas, my timing had to be just right to get fresh grouper or hogfish (or wahoo, or mahi-mahi, etc.), otherwise it was quickly filleted and frozen. Most of what I bought there on the island was locally caught, bought just off the dock where the fishermen brought in their catches, yet if I missed by a couple of hours, it was already in the freezer.

We do get great beef here in rural Colorado though - and can buy it on the hoof - hogs too, so I guess that's a trade off.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 11:40 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,844
We eat and ate Monkfish long before it became fashionable.
I have heard it called poor mans lobster before as its texture is quite firm.
I have found Monkfish to be one one the seas finest fish for consumption.
Its delicious and very adaptable to most any cooking method.
Broiled or grilled with a little butter and lemon is easy enough and very, very good.
No special sauce needed. IMO.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 12:11 PM   #17
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,415
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
We eat and ate Monkfish long before it became fashionable.
I have heard it called poor mans lobster before as its texture is quite firm.
I have found Monkfish to be one one the seas finest fish for consumption.
Its delicious and very adaptable to most any cooking method.
Broiled or grilled with a little butter and lemon is easy enough and very, very good.
No special sauce needed. IMO.
This is the way I had it growing up. We also called it "poor man's lobster" and it was one of my dad's specialties. He would poach it in a little milk and serve with drawn butter and lemon.

I can't recall if he salted it beforehand, though. It's entirely possible.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 12:23 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by creative View Post
I was very disappointed since I had been expecting a strong flavour....not at all the case! I dislike the close (almost grisly) texture of it so,

Monkfish is a very mild-flavored fish.

I've been cooking and eating it for 30 years (without pre-salting to pull out moisture) and I've never found it gristley (sp?). If it's tough, you might be overcooking it.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 01:15 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,614
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Monkfish is a very mild-flavored fish.

I've been cooking and eating it for 30 years (without pre-salting to pull out moisture) and I've never found it gristley (sp?). If it's tough, you might be overcooking it.
No it wasn't tough. I cooked it perfectly (as directed on the package)...if anything very slightly undercooked in the thickest part...perhaps this accounts for the slightly grisly texture there. It is very close textured though...not appealing for a white fish - I guess I prefer a flaky texture.
__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2015, 01:18 PM   #20
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,614
Well, I had been waiting for a post that tried monkfish both ways, i.e. as it comes and the presalting method (one hour before cooking - to rid of its water content). I think I may have talked myself out of wanting to try it again, unless someone says how transformed it is after presalting, i.e. more flavourful compared to cooking it straight.
__________________

__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fish, salt

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.