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Old 08-31-2008, 02:58 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by kadesma View Post
well I'll be barked at...I make a mean cream puff too the rest of it is take your chances..I'm lousy at beef stew, soups, except my french onion and clam chowder...baking heck I'm the worlds best at hockey pucks kadesma
Yeah, but you're the world's best "salad thinker-upper and maker!!!" (That is the official cooking term, isn't it?! LOL).

Barbara
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Old 08-31-2008, 03:15 AM   #42
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To the best of my knowledge spatchcock chicken is NOT a baby chicken but the method in which it is cut i.e., backbone removed and layed out flat - you can certainly use a young chicken but that term denotes the way it is cut, not the age...at least around here. Just like our green onions are your shallots - it may just be a regional difference. A 5 - 6 lb. chicken is certainly not abnormal. And June's recipe is spot on!!!!
I am not questioning June's recipe.

Spatchcock IS a baby chicken. The cutting method or style has nothing to do with it...However, it is common for the spine to be removed from spatchcock...but removal of the spine does not make it a spatchcock.

From Wiki - A spatchcock is a baby chicken
Spatchcock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

From another site - young chicken, no more than 6 weeks old.
Where Did The Word Spatchcock Come From?

And that is but only 2 online examples. Actually I don't agree with my second example. Maybe today with forced feeding and steroids etc, a spatchcock could be 6 weeks. But free range, I would say upto 3 months.

You might be correct though...It might be a regional thing. I do believe that in certain parts a spatchcock is a guinea hen (regardless of age).

Anyway...back to the chicken...Is that 5-6 ponds a live weight or dead prepared weight? I would accept a live weight...But a dead, gutted, plucked ready for shop weight - no way!...Not free range, no way.

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Old 08-31-2008, 08:12 AM   #43
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Geez, the only thing I can think of that I have trouble with is fried eggs - either the yolk or the white breaks when I flip them. I asked DH and he couldn't think of anything, either

For those having trouble with rice, here's my absolutely fool-proof method: How do you cook rice?
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Old 08-31-2008, 08:20 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by KissTC View Post
Spatchcock IS a baby chicken. The cutting method or style has nothing to do with it.
From Wiki - A spatchcock is a baby chicken
Spatchcock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I guess you did not read your own link that you referenced. Let me point out the relevant part...

Quote:
A spatchcock is a baby chicken (or game bird) that is prepared for roasting and broiling over a grill/spit, or a bird that has been cooked after being prepared in this way.
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Old 08-31-2008, 08:26 AM   #45
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For those having trouble with rice, here's my absolutely fool-proof method: How do you cook rice?
Here is mine
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Old 08-31-2008, 09:40 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by KissTC View Post

Spatchcock IS a baby chicken. The cutting method or style has nothing to do with it...However, it is common for the spine to be removed from spatchcock...but removal of the spine does not make it a spatchcock.



From another site - young chicken, no more than 6 weeks old.
Where Did The Word Spatchcock Come From?


Yeah, but .....

Kiss, if you read down the whole site in the second link you posted (above), you'll see that most of the definitions do not refer to a baby chicken, but rather to butterflying the bird.

The reference to Nigella Bites is interesting, where it states, "It has been said that the English will adamantly tell you that the only definition of "spatchcock" is a young chicken, no more than 6 weeks old." (Nooooo, really?? )

Lee
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Old 08-31-2008, 09:43 AM   #47
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Believe it or not, the one thing that I just CANNOT get right is fried chicken. My mom always fried hers to perfection in her deep dish pan. I got that same pan and either burned it or it was still raw in the middle. I did everything she told me, but NEVER got it right.
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Old 08-31-2008, 10:05 AM   #48
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Unless I make it in a slow cooker... I can not make a pot roast. It comes out bone dry and the potatoes never cook.
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Old 08-31-2008, 10:07 AM   #49
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Cool thread-

For those having trouble with tortillas, are you using manteca?

For those with rice trouble, man I wish I could help. Basmati is almost the only rice I eat anymore and I have to admit, no matter what method I use to cook it has always turned out great.

Smoke King- If you ever decide to give cheesecake another whirl I have a recipe that always been fool-proof for me- It was even good the time I forgot to add the eggs!

Alix- With the cream puffs is it just the pate a choux that your have trouble with?


Here's my list-

Southern style fried chicken: I can do it tempura, with regular and panko bread crumbs, but just cant get that southern-style right,

Most breads, biscuits, pizza crusts- I can't get them to rise, or they have no flavor, too dense, etc. I have gotten it right a couple of times, but for the life of me I dunno what I did different to make it right! I still have old reliable though- Jiffy corn bread mix!

Braised Short Ribs: Almost all of my braises come out great, and while the texture is fine when I make this, the flavor is just muddy; none of my aromatics or spices stand out, they just sort of combine into "bleh".
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Old 08-31-2008, 11:08 AM   #50
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Believe it or not, the one thing that I just CANNOT get right is fried chicken. My mom always fried hers to perfection in her deep dish pan. I got that same pan and either burned it or it was still raw in the middle. I did everything she told me, but NEVER got it right.
I never could either and same went for chicken fried steak. I got to watch some girls from Oklahoma make chicken fried steak they used electric skillets. I went and bought a big one and have had no trouble frying chicken, chicken fried steak etc. I believe my problem was I couldn't get the oil at the right temp on the stove the electric fryer will do it for you it for you. All the years I worked in restaurants you had the deep fryer for these things. I have no interest in using a themometer to check oil temp on stove way to much trouble.
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