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Old 09-18-2009, 10:05 AM   #1
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Need advice on healthy but tasty recipies

I want to find new healthy but tasty recipes. But I'm at a crossroad...

I grew up on my Depression-raised parents' French-Canadian cooking, most of which I find bland & heavy and don't eat anymore.

My husband grew up on heavy post-WWII Polish cooking (lots of meat, cabbage, onions, bread, potatoes, breaded/fried), which he unfortunately still loves.

For the last 20 years, I've been juggling the Polish cooking my husband likes with some ethnic cooking (Mexican, Indian...) with the 80's & 90's stir-fry/pasta/chicken nugget/burger/hot dog.

My husband would like everyday suppers of homemade soup, roast meat (or breaded & fried), potatoes, gravy, hot vegetable (with some kind of topping) or salad (with croutons, bacon bits & lots of dressing) and bread on the side. He is a little heavy, but not overweight.

That is not only too heavy and unhealthy for me, it's a lot of work. My daughter and I don't like any of this (except for the homemade soup).

My daughter and I prefer lightly grilled chicken or fish, or vegetable dumplings, with a small side of whole-grain rice or wheat noodles and, steamed vegetables. We also like Asian cooking, which my husband does not. If I prepare a light meal my daughter & I like, my husband will get a sandwich 2 hours later.

I don't know what to cook anymore. It's made me lose my will to cook. So I'm looking for a cookbook to inspire me.

Some of the new cooking is have too many fad-ish ingredients (cilantro, balsamic), too complicated (Flay, Battaglio...), too rich (Emeril, Rachel Ray, Nigella, Michael Smith), too "pretty"/artsy or too low-fat that taste is forgotten.

There are thousands of recipes on recipe websites. The odds of finding a good one are slim...finding more than that, forget it.

Please, anyone been in a similar situation? Any suggestions?

Mattie

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Old 09-18-2009, 10:21 AM   #2
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My husband is a picky eater, and I love everything. I will compromise by adding a second vegetable to the meal, one for each of us, and when making my spaghetti sauce or chili, I don't make it as chunky as I'd like, same ingredients, just smaller dice.
We've switched to healthier pasta and whole grain bread. I will use a cornstarch thickener instead of a butter/flour roux. Use lighter versions of favorite dressings, and make those purchased croutons and bacon bits disappear. Just don't buy them. Fill your pantry with healthier choices.
I found the cookbook for the Sonoma Diet to be interesting.
Do you work outside the home, too? If so, then have nights where he cooks. If not, have weekend meals where he cooks... Maybe if he knew just how hard it was, he'd lighten up. so to speak. and if he feels the need to make a sandwich later, well, let him. Maybe when he gets tired of making sandwiches every night he'll learn to like what you cook.
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:25 AM   #3
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In my household there were always two choices: either eat or don't!

What I suggest is weaning him away from his heavy menu gradually, starting with your kind of cuisine twice a week - and tell him that - tell him you want a choice for yourself once in a while, and emphasize the benefits of whatever it is you make, and he would benefit from expanding his range of flavors to include international fare - almost like a game. And as he becomes accustom to new things, you may be able to increase to three or perhaps even every other day for yourself.

By the way, cilantro and balsamic vinegar are not "fad-ish" ingredients. They may be new to you, but they have been around for a long time! Pick a recipe that has one new ingredient to you, buy it and try it - experiment for yourself as well. If you don't like it... give it to a friend. Be bold!

Good luck and enjoy!
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:42 AM   #4
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My pantry *is* full of healthy choices. "...make those purchased croutons and bacon bits disappear..." ???? NOT an option. Duh! Who thinks like that anymore? He buys what he wants - the same way I do.

When he cooks, he cooks stuff he likes. He know cooking - like everything else - is work.

What I need are recipes/cookbook to bridge the gap.
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:46 AM   #5
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If he buys what he wants, and you think it is stupid (the "duh!") to do otherwise, then you deserve each other and the problems you are having.
Lots of people that are trying to eat healthy empty their cupboards of unhealthy ingredients. Lots of people think that way.
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:49 AM   #6
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healthy recipes - Google Search
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:50 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
In my household there were always two choices: either eat or don't!

What I suggest is weaning him away from his heavy menu gradually, starting with your kind of cuisine twice a week - and tell him that - tell him you want a choice for yourself once in a while, and emphasize the benefits of whatever it is you make, and he would benefit from expanding his range of flavors to include international fare - almost like a game. And as he becomes accustom to new things, you may be able to increase to three or perhaps even every other day for yourself.

By the way, cilantro and balsamic vinegar are not "fad-ish" ingredients. They may be new to you, but they have been around for a long time! Pick a recipe that has one new ingredient to you, buy it and try it - experiment for yourself as well. If you don't like it... give it to a friend. Be bold!

Good luck and enjoy!
For years, I have introduced great meals the rest of the family loved, but he never acquired a taste for any of it. I still make make them and he still doesn't enjoy any.

P.S. Balsamic is not new to me...I have given it years...it's truly horrid.
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:52 AM   #8
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"healthy recipes" on google...

Did that exact search a few months ago. That is what caused me to write "...There are thousands of recipes on recipe websites. The odds of finding a good one are slim...finding more than that, forget it..."
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:52 AM   #9
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point? I guess we are just trying to help, but you have found a negative aspect to everything thus far.
Have you looked at the Sonoma Cookbook that I recommended?
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Old 09-18-2009, 10:56 AM   #10
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healthy cookbooks - Google Search
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