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Old 04-21-2011, 04:11 PM   #1
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Need help with buttermilk question

I wanted to make this cake but it calls for whole butter milk but I can't find that anywhere I have reduced fat buttermilk can I use this instand of whole butter milk?

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Old 04-21-2011, 04:38 PM   #2
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I would use the regular buttermilk. I do not see how buttermilk could be whole because the fat (butter) has been removed. What am I missing?
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Old 04-21-2011, 04:41 PM   #3
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can i use reduced fat buttermilk
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Old 04-21-2011, 04:44 PM   #4
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I would.
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Old 04-21-2011, 04:44 PM   #5
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Yes you can. In fact that is the only kind of buttermilk I can find.

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Old 04-21-2011, 06:31 PM   #6
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When you make butter, you start with cream and agitate it either in a butter churn or a mixer (unless you are a butter factory, then you have huge machines that do the same thing).

Buttermilk, by definition, is low fat.

The agitation causes the fat molecules to separate and stick together, forming butter. What's left is skim or low fat milk that becomes buttermilk either naturally or with the addition of enzymes to aid the process.
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Old 04-21-2011, 06:58 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I would use the regular buttermilk. I do not see how buttermilk could be whole because the fat (butter) has been removed. What am I missing?
Most supermarket buttermilk is cultured buttermilk which is just regular milk with lactic acid bacteria added. It can be fat free, 1%,2% or whole. I can't recall seeing whole in my store.

Like others have said, when it's made traditionally it's lower fat, which may explain why you generally see 1% buttermilk in stores.
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Old 04-22-2011, 05:26 AM   #8
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Yes I am pretty sure you can use reduced fat buttermilk instead of whole buttermilk. Just to let you know though, I found out on the internet buttermilk does not contain any butter.

If butter is needed I highly recommend I can't believe its not butter! Light such as in Wal-Mart, KMart etc. look near eggs, refrigeration stuff etc.

Great luck to you!

I hope you enjoy your food(s) ;) ; )
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Old 04-22-2011, 07:27 AM   #9
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Buttermilk is the whey that remains after churning butter. The butter is the fat that's been nearly all removed and buttermilk is what's left, so naturally it would be low fat. Lactic acid or certain enzyme cultures congeal what fat remains, which is what thickens buttermilk.

One tablespoon of white vinegar added to each cup of whole or 2% milk and let set for 5 minutes makes a buttermilk substitute.
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Old 04-22-2011, 09:11 AM   #10
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I bath in it once a year because I can't find an ass.I think I better stop there..............
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