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Old 07-03-2012, 12:09 PM   #1
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Novice hitting problems with bread making

Could someone please tell me how I stop my dough/bread from going flat once it's placed on the baking tray for the final proving.

Up until that moment bread making could not be simpler but I end up with a tasty loaf about 2 inches high !

Thanks

Kuler

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Old 07-03-2012, 12:17 PM   #2
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Can you post your recipe and method? It will help us troubleshoot with you.

Some ideas off the top of my head are 1) old yeast, 2) not a warm enough environment for final proof, 3) not a long enough proof
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Old 07-03-2012, 01:38 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
Can you post your recipe and method? It will help us troubleshoot with you.

Some ideas off the top of my head are 1) old yeast, 2) not a warm enough environment for final proof, 3) not a long enough proof
+1

Also, what kind of bread are you making?
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:49 PM   #4
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I had problems with baking bread till I started using an instant-read thermometer to make sure the water was at the right temp. Should be about 90 degrees F.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:57 PM   #5
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Post in detail what you're doing, but also, do you mean it's rising the last time and then falling, or it just fails to rise the last proofing period?
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:01 PM   #6
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Google 'bread surface tension'.
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Old 07-03-2012, 04:38 PM   #7
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Use a high gluten flour and / or consider enriching the dough mix with ascorbic acid.
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:09 AM   #8
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I let the bread rise twice....once when i prepare the dough and second when i work the dough well and form bread, i put bread loafs in the baking pan, and leave it to rest for 30 minutes, then i bake it in a preheated oven.

As was previosly said it depends on the flour, yeast and type of bread you are baking
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