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Old 05-23-2005, 03:29 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by college_cook
i fried for the first time about 5 days ago, and used vegetable oil... it seemed to turn out rather well. Are peanut and canola better?

Peanut oil and canola oil are vegetable oil!

There is no such thing as "vegatable oil," really. It is called that to distiguish it from animal fats. Any oil made from vegetable matter (eg, peanuts, olives, flaxseed, corn) is technically vegetbale oil.

If the bottle says "vegetable oil," look closer and you'll see what it's made from.

Here's a smoke point chart: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Colle...mokePoints.htm
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Old 05-23-2005, 06:42 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Peanut oil and canola oil are vegetable oil!

There is no such thing as "vegatable oil," really. It is called that to distiguish it from animal fats. Any oil made from vegetable matter (eg, peanuts, olives, flaxseed, corn) is technically vegetbale oil.

If the bottle says "vegetable oil," look closer and you'll see what it's made from.

Here's a smoke point chart: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Colle...mokePoints.htm
Technically they are, but they are not used in the blend of oils that used to make what is marketed and labeled as "Vegetable Oil". The oils that are used are usually one or more of the following: Corn, Soybean, and Sunflower. These oils are then further refined to produce a higher smoking point and almost virtually no scent or flavor. It's called a "Vegetable Oil" because it's a blend, and it's easier to market it and label it that way.
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Old 05-23-2005, 06:59 PM   #13
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The bottom line is that everyone will always have their own personal preferrence which types of oil they use, but why not use one that's cheap and relatively healthy for you?


Canola Oil
Canola is the marketing name for oil that is obtained from rapeseeds. Bright yellow rape crops can be spotted in fields in many parts of Europe and North America. The oil is popular in Japan, China, and India and it is the most widely used oil in Canada. It is also popular in the northern United States and is gaining popularity throughout the remainder of the country.

Canola oil is also known as LEAR oil, or "Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed" oil. It has the lowest level of saturated fat of any edible oil and has one of the highest levels of heart-healthy monounsaturated fat. It also contains a high level of omega-3 fatty acids, which is a polyunsaturated fat that helps to decrease the risk of heart disease and lowers blood pressure. Because it is mildly flavored and inexpensively priced, canola oil is an excellent choice for cooking or baking, or as an ingredient for salad dressings.


The only Peanut Oil I use are the ones that are strongly flavored and scented, but I learned something new as well about domestic peanut oils:


Peanut Oil

In the United States, the oil obtained from peanuts is almost clear and has a mild flavor due to the refining process that is used. The Chinese version has more of a peanut taste and aroma. Refined peanut oil has a high smoke point so it is an excellent choice for sautéing and frying. It does not absorb or transfer flavors from food during the cooking process. It is also high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which makes it a healthy oil to use for cooking or as a base for dressings. It will keep for long periods if stored in its original container in a cool, dark place. Peanut oil is also known as groundnut oil and it should be remembered that its use in cooking might cause severe illness in people allergic to peanuts.

Vegetable Oil

Vegetable oil usually consists of a highly refined blend of various oils such as soybean, corn, and sunflower or it may consist of only one type of oil. The label may or may not list the types of oil contained within the blend, so the consumer will often never know exactly what they are purchasing. The refining process usually results in oil that has a high smoke point and a color ranging from almost clear to golden yellow, but with very little taste or aroma. This makes vegetable oil a good all-purpose oil for sautéing, frying, and baking, but it should not be used as a condiment.
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Old 05-23-2005, 06:59 PM   #14
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cyberian - sounds like you got a jug of "unrefined" sunflower oil - whch has a very low smoke point (about 225-F). Refined sunflower oil has a smoke point of about 440-F ... up there with peanut oil.

For a quick list of oil smoke points - look here: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Colle...mokePoints.htm
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Old 05-24-2005, 06:11 AM   #15
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I couldn't find the exact one I have. So I will give some more info from the label:

100% Pure Sunflower Oil
Low in saturated fat
70% polyunsaturates
19% momounsaturates

CAUTION: Any oil will burn if overheated. To not leave unattended while heating. Smoking Point: 410F (210C).

I don't know if the above caution is a standard warning to all oil or not since it says "any oil will..." rather than saying the current type of oil.
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Old 05-25-2005, 06:09 PM   #16
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When in doubt - read the label!

The "CAUTION: Any oil will burn if overheated. To not leave unattended while heating." is a standard warning. The "Smoking Point: 410F (210C)." seems to be specific for your jug of oil. Since you only need to heat it to about 375-F for french fries (below it's smoke point) it "should" be safe to use - even for deep frying - as long as you use a thermometer and watch the temp.
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Old 05-27-2005, 12:00 PM   #17
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I don't have a thermometer. The switch only has numbers. :/ Which number should I set it on?
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