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Old 06-27-2011, 01:26 PM   #1
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Outdoor woodfire pizza oven - dough problems.

Was at a friends house over the weekend and saw his awesome new backyard renovation which included this hand made pizza oven. It still needs an outer shell for more insulation, but was in full working condition for our dinner get-together.



Since it was the first try at actually making pizza in the oven, my friend and his wife were having some challenges with the dough, which I found out was regular store bought bread dough. I mean, the crust was okay, but did not have the thin-crust quality and consistency of the same you would find in a restaurant.

I thought that maybe there should be less yeast in this kind of dough, but really wasn't too sure and was hoping some of the bread dough scientists in this forum could offer some suggestions.

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Old 06-27-2011, 01:43 PM   #2
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I would never use store bought dough lol. I always make my own dough and I have already figured out a lot of tricks. I'll make a new thread to summarize all about pizza dough making
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Old 06-27-2011, 01:45 PM   #3
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If they want to use bought dough, suggest they buy some from a local pizza place rather than use bread dough.
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Old 06-27-2011, 01:50 PM   #4
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If I'm in a pinch I'll go to Trader Joe's and get their plain pizza dough.

Your friend's oven looks familiar. I might have seen it over at the brick oven forum.
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Old 06-27-2011, 03:11 PM   #5
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The key to thin crust is high-gluten flour - the highest you can get.

Also, forming the crust and then precooking it for 3 to 4 minutes before adding the sauce and whatnot will give it that crackerish crunch.
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Old 06-27-2011, 04:02 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deepfryerdan View Post
The key to thin crust is high-gluten flour - the highest you can get.

Also, forming the crust and then precooking it for 3 to 4 minutes before adding the sauce and whatnot will give it that crackerish crunch.
precooking the crust only works for home oven. He has a brick oven with very high temperature, there's no time for precooking. What they need to do is to get the crust very thin and then add toppings as quickly as possible (thus only allows minimum topping) and put it in a super hot oven. If they want to have topping rich pizzas like those from domino, then they should stick to low temp home oven and a pan
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:22 PM   #7
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Quote:
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precooking the crust only works for home oven. He has a brick oven with very high temperature, there's no time for precooking. What they need to do is to get the crust very thin and then add toppings as quickly as possible (thus only allows minimum topping) and put it in a super hot oven. If they want to have topping rich pizzas like those from domino, then they should stick to low temp home oven and a pan
Interesting about only minmal toppings. I was a server in a restaurant that served wood fire oven pizzas, and this was by not a limitation at all.

I just wish I had paid closer attention to their pizza dough recipe and process.
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:39 PM   #8
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Well, perhaps heavily topped pizzas were cooked longer in the 'cool zone' within the brick oven.
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Old 07-02-2011, 02:25 PM   #9
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Well, perhaps heavily topped pizzas were cooked longer in the 'cool zone' within the brick oven.
well the reason I advocate minimal toppings is because if you spend too much time putting toppings on, the sauce (if there is any) will soak through the thin dough and end up destroying the bubbles, giving you no ovenspring on the topping part of the crust. but you know, I'm the one who's obsessed about ovenspring on pizzas so it's just me:)
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Old 07-10-2011, 07:51 AM   #10
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With a wood fired oven your dough should be flour, water, salt and yeast. Other adders such as oil or sugar will burn in the high heat. I use caputo 00 flour in my wfo. A wfo pizza shop will cook at between 800 and 900 degrees for 1-2 minutes, a restaurant with a wfo pizza oven, sometimes gas fired, cook at 550 to 600 degrees, which can handle toppings.
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