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Old 03-17-2012, 12:08 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Supposedly, soaking the beans loosens the skins which allows the the gas causing agent (oligosaccherides) to be released. I've done both, but find chick peas are better if soaked overnight.
Nah, it doesn't, but that cooking them with a bit of cilantro helps with the musical part of the fruit.

Chickpeas/garbanzos are probably better after an overnight-er because they are just BIG beans.
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:52 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Zereh View Post
Contrary to popular belief, it is not necessary to soak them before cooking them.

90-minute No-Soak Beans. It works perfectly every time with every type of bean imaginable. I have been doing it this way for a couple years. No more soaking for me!
I did some looking at this method. And I like the idea of it. But my first attempt at 250 only about 1/2 cooked the beans. I will try again at a higher temp and see what that does.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:45 AM   #13
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i'm not a bean eater but i heard once that the starches in the soak water are the thing that gives you gas --- rinsing the beans after the soak avoids the discomfort.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:56 AM   #14
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Nah, it doesn't, but that cooking them with a bit of cilantro helps with the musical part of the fruit.

Chickpeas/garbanzos are probably better after an overnight-er because they are just BIG beans.
I think it's epizote, not cilantro
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:00 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema

I think it's epizote, not cilantro
Yup, epazote is the "bean herb."
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:04 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Veri Similitude View Post
i'm not a bean eater but i heard once that the starches in the soak water are the thing that gives you gas --- rinsing the beans after the soak avoids the discomfort.
What discomfort?

I guess Ogres just don't understand...
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:53 AM   #17
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Good Morning,

I always use the traditional method of soaking beans overnight to insure their tenderness. I would never think of not doing so. At moment, this is what I can think tank of !

Interesting post Princess Fiona, and have lovely Sunday.

Margi.
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:59 AM   #18
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Good Morning,

I caught the tail end of a need to clarify 3 Latin American products, so I posted this.

Epazote Herb: often considered a nuisance in gardens, it is often called Skunk Weed, and its serrated leaves give off an aroma, similar to mint combined with petrol. However, they bring a delicious savoriness to beans and corn truffle or corn mushroom called Huitlacoche in Mexico.

Culantro: also known as recao and long coriander, this is also confused with Cilantro ! This is the green paste that is used in numerous Puerto Rican dishes and Sofritos.

Cilantro: Mexican Parsley herb, from the coriander and used in numerous dishes throughout South America, Morocco, Tunisia, Mid East and Mexico, Caribe and Central America. Most commonly used in Guacamole.

Have a lovely Sunday.
Margi.
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Old 03-18-2012, 07:04 AM   #19
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Good Morning,

It is a tradition in the Mediterranean and the Latin American part of the world, that after beans or legumes have soaked in salted water overnight that they are rinsed quite thoroughly before any cooking process begins. It is the standard method of preparing the beans for the dish.

Have a nice Sunday.
Margi.
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Old 03-18-2012, 08:34 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Good Morning,

I caught the tail end of a need to clarify 3 Latin American products, so I posted this.

Epazote Herb: often considered a nuisance in gardens, it is often called Skunk Weed, and its serrated leaves give off an aroma, similar to mint combined with petrol. However, they bring a delicious savoriness to beans and corn truffle or corn mushroom called Huitlacoche in Mexico.

Culantro: also known as recao and long coriander, this is also confused with Cilantro ! This is the green paste that is used in numerous Puerto Rican dishes and Sofritos.

Cilantro: Mexican Parsley herb, from the coriander and used in numerous dishes throughout South America, Morocco, Tunisia, Mid East and Mexico, Caribe and Central America. Most commonly used in Guacamole.

Have a lovely Sunday.
Margi.
Cilantro is also used in a lot of Asian and Southeast Asian dishes.
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