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Old 04-18-2014, 07:23 PM   #11
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I'm just curious, why do you think there'd be a difference? I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just don't understand.
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Old 04-18-2014, 08:08 PM   #12
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pistos, the techniques described here are fine BUT, you have to refine them to your specific conditions. You can certainly cook a steak properly in a wok. You just have to adjust for your burners and the metal of your wok. Carbon steel woks transfer heat quickly. Cast iron skillets are at the opposite end of the spectrum and transfer heat slowly. A wok will cool down more when you put the meat in while the CI won't because it holds more heat energy.

So MAYBE you use a lower heat for a short time or a higher heat for a shorter time, or...

You have to do the fine tuning based on those factors and how thick you steaks are, what cut they are and how you like them cooked.
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Old 04-18-2014, 08:10 PM   #13
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I use cast iron to cook steaks because it holds heat well, has enough room in the bottom to fit the whole steak, and can be put in the oven to finish if need be. If I'm.being honest though, the main reason I do it is because that's how I learned to cook a steak on the stove and have never found a reason to change it.

A wok is thinner metal, so I would think it would be more succeptable to temperature changes and frankly, mine is huge and barely fits in my sink, so I'm not going to deal with washing it unlesz I need it.

However, a wok is metal, it conducts heat from the source to your food, and if yours has room to cook the steak you want and you've figured out how to get a finished product that you enjoy, why change it? Obviously it can work since you make it work.

As for your actual question, I like my steak with a very dark sear. I've been known to order it "Pittsburgh" style for that reason and like rare to medium rare, so a very hot pan works well for me. However, DH likes a lighter sear than I do (typical browned) and likes his meat at least medium, so I have to turn the temp down for his like you said. I could just finish his in the oven like others mentioned, but I usually don't want to heat the whole oven (and apartment) up just for one steak. I usually just turn the pan down and deal with the lighter sear, since it's still delicious and I only have one cast iron skillet. :)
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Old 04-19-2014, 01:25 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pistos View Post
It's an electric stove with a carbon steel wok, nice quality. I like 1" ribeyes the best.

I can't imagine switching from a wok to a skillet would be better, it's a flat bottom wok and the steak fits nicely in it. I could see going from steel to cast iron making a difference.


Anyways I started the thread 'cause everything I read about pan frying steaks said to cook very, very hot to get a good sear, but I found too hot and I'd get a crunchy brown crust and some burning, not the type of tasty sear I get at a nice steakhouse.

It seems I shouldn't need to keep it so hot for the entire cooking time, which makes sense and will make me a very
I don't sear in a really hot pan. One reason is that I don't like steak charred, and second is that when using a multi-ply stainless pan, the meat will stick if the pan isn't the right temperature. Too hot or too cool is bad, but I can still get a good sear for a medium rare steak in a medium hot pan. Depending on the thickness of the steak, I'll either cook it complete at that setting, or I'll start it like that then turn it down for a while to achieve the proper finish.
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Old 04-19-2014, 01:54 PM   #15
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Flank steak done on a stove top cast iron grill pan to a perfect medium.




Then another way to cook a thick steak (Someone already mentioned)

(Look at the price (and thickness) for that PRIME cut moo!!)







Prime sirloin steak cooked via reverse searing. I seasoned and let it sit for about 1 hour. Put in 275F oven for approx. 25 minutes for 2 -inch steak till internal temp was 90F. Then seared on cast iron stovetop grill pan till internal temp was 117F.





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Old 04-19-2014, 02:55 PM   #16
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OMG, MsM, my mouth is watering! That looks incredible SO GLAD I have NY Strip Steaks on the menu for tonight!
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Old 04-19-2014, 03:08 PM   #17
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OMG, MsM, my mouth is watering! That looks incredible SO GLAD I have NY Strip Steaks on the menu for tonight!
Thank you GG. NY Strip Steaks are my FAVORITE steaks!! I have flank steak for tonight (doing it on the CI grill pan) with Caesar salad and garlic bread as sides.
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Old 04-19-2014, 04:10 PM   #18
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There is no reason this cannot be done in a wok.
Same principle regardless.

I don't rely on appearance, but time on steaks. But I am very used to my pan and my stove.
A 1" steak for medium rare should take no longer than 2-3 minutes perside and almost 10 minutes rest time.

Allow steak to sear on each side and do not turn more than once. If you think it might not be done enough, is most likely when its done. At least for me. Less cooked is always better for my personal taste.
I would rather under cook than over cook.
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Old 04-19-2014, 07:51 PM   #19
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Wow thanks all for the advice and tips. I think I was being too dogmatic on cooking on high (my late Granny had a magnet on her fridge that read "only wimps cook on low" :D
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Old 04-20-2014, 06:43 PM   #20
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Thanks again for the help guys! I fried up a couple of strip loin tonight and they were delicious! Even though I overcooked them a touch (plenty of pink, but I like a touch of red in the center).

Strip loin isn't my favorite, it seems really tender but for me it doesn't have much flavor as my favorite ribeye. I like it for stir frys because it absorbs the flavor of whatever sauce I use (usually just soy), and I can usually get it for a reasonable price. Unfortunately I went shopping at 8PM on Easter eve, so I was stuck with strip loin

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