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Old 10-24-2013, 06:12 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Treacle is essentially the same as Molasses. Having had both, I can say that Molasses is just a bit sweeter. But I think molasses is a good substitute.

The real trick to making Parkin in this country is finding Golden Syrup. We don't really have the equivalent in the US, although a web search indicates that World Market sells Lyle's brand. I may have to go check that out.
I recall Golden Syrup from summers in Canada. Good stuff.

Now this is strange, apparently you can order Lyle's from Walmart. Don't know if they carry it in-store. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Lyle-s-Gol...of-12/17182633
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:01 PM   #12
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What a fun and interesting post, Mad Cook. Thanks very much. Do you happen to know where the name 'Parkin' came from?
No idea. I think I'll have to try and find out.

EDIT:- Not much on Google although "Parkin" is a fairly common Yorkshire surname so perhaps the first people to sell it in a shop were called Parkin but that's only a wild guess.
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:02 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post

I recall Golden Syrup from summers in Canada. Good stuff.

Now this is strange, apparently you can order Lyle's from Walmart. Don't know if they carry it in-store. http://www.walmart.com/ip/Lyle-s-Gol...of-12/17182633
Dawg - That wouldn't be Corn Syrup would it? I've never heard of Golden Syrup.
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:07 PM   #14
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Dawg - That wouldn't be Corn Syrup would it? I've never heard of Golden Syrup.
RJ, pretty sure it was called Golden Syrup, but that was many moons ago. We kept it on the table, it was in a tin, as I recall. I'd eat it by the spoonful. Used it on cereal, pancakes, waffles.
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:16 PM   #15
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I love Bommy Night !!! Can you share your treacle toffee recipe please ?
Will do. I'll look it out in the morning as I'm off to bed in a minute. Simple to make but I can't remember the amounts of the ingredients.

'Night, 'night all.
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:26 PM   #16
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RJ, pretty sure it was called Golden Syrup, but that was many moons ago. We kept it on the table, it was in a tin, as I recall. I'd eat it by the spoonful. Used it on cereal, pancakes, waffles.
Yes, it would be golden syrup, made by Tate & Lyle and other companies (T&L is the best flavour). It's a by-product of the sugar refining process. It doesn't taste like corn syrup but I suppose if flavour wasn't too important you could substitute. Alternatively you could (I suppose) you could use maple syrup although the maple syrup I have is much thinner than golden syrup.

Apart from using it in baking I like it on my porridge.

(By the way, Brits, I managed to find light and dark corn syrup in Tesco and Aldi recently)
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Old 10-25-2013, 12:33 PM   #17
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Yoo-hoo, Tinlizzie - re parkin recipe

I've had my head in boxes most of today, looking for the parkin recipe and several other things. I think it must be among the stuff in storage. Anyway, I need it tomorrow for my baking day on Sunday so I'll go and have a root about for it in the morning. Fortunately the boxes in storage are all labelled as to contents. I have a list of other things I need.
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Old 10-25-2013, 12:40 PM   #18
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Dawg - That wouldn't be Corn Syrup would it? I've never heard of Golden Syrup.
Golden Syrup. I wasn't able to find it at World Market. I could've ordered it online I suppose, but my wife is in London this week, so I just had her pick some up (along with several other yummy items we can't easily get over here, e.g. Watkins Mushroom Ketchup).

So I will be making Parkin on Sunday.

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Old 10-25-2013, 06:04 PM   #19
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Golden Syrup. I wasn't able to find it at World Market. I could've ordered it online I suppose, but my wife is in London this week, so I just had her pick some up (along with several other yummy items we can't easily get over here, e.g. Watkins Mushroom Ketchup).

So I will be making Parkin on Sunday.

Now there's dedication to your craft - sending your wife all the way to London for golden syrup.
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Old 10-25-2013, 06:08 PM   #20
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I've had my head in boxes most of today, looking for the parkin recipe and several other things. I think it must be among the stuff in storage. Anyway, I need it tomorrow for my baking day on Sunday so I'll go and have a root about for it in the morning. Fortunately the boxes in storage are all labelled as to contents. I have a list of other things I need.
Suddenly had a brain wave on the way home from the stables and I've found the recipe in a box in the garage. Here we go

Bonfire Night Parkin
100g butter (or margarine. Old recipes often used lard)
100g soft brown sugar
100g black treacle or molasses
100g golden syrup
150g rolled oats or medium oat meal
150g plain flour
2 teaspoons of baking powder
3 teaspoons of ground ginger
Large pinch of grated nutmeg
Small pinch of salt
2 medium eggs
2 tablespoons of milk
Line an 8inch square baking tin/pan with baking paper and preheat your oven to 300F/150C.
In a saucepan, melt together the sugar, butter, treacle & syrup Using a low heat so the ingredients melt together without coming to the boil, once melted remove from the heat and set aside to cool a little while you mix together the oats, flour, baking powder, ginger, nutmeg & salt in a large bowl, then pour in the warm liquids from the pan and mix gently to combine.
In a small bowl whisk the eggs and milk together, then add into the large bowl little at a time and again mix thoroughly. Pour the mixture into the lined baking tin and place in the middle of the oven for 30-45 minutes until the cake is firm to the touch. The operative word is ďpourĒ - donít panic that the mixture is too runny. You may even need a little more milk.
Leave to cool in the baking tin/pan before placing in a tin or airtight container where the cake will keep for up to a week or even longer. Itís usually ok at room temp. Itís essential to be patient as the cooked cake needs maturing time to acquire the right degree of sticky moistness.
N.B. our plain flour is less strong than your All Purpose flour. I have read that you can add a little cornflour/cornstarch to AP flour to approximate British ďplainĒ flour but Iíve never tried this so canít vouch for it.
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