"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-23-2004, 05:26 PM   #21
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
Thanks to all for this thread. I'd never heard of the stuff, but was very impressed by your opinions and their website and pricing. I look forward to the arrival of their catalog, but hope the Sarawack I ordered anyway today arrives first!
__________________

__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2004, 05:35 PM   #22
Senior Cook
 
chesterchippy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chester, NH
Posts: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audeo
I look forward to the arrival of their catalog, but hope the Sarawack I ordered anyway today arrives first!
A catalogue will probably arrive with your order. I think you will really like this company.
__________________

__________________
chesterchippy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2004, 05:51 PM   #23
Senior Cook
 
merstarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robt
Merstar,

You are making really good choices on the sarawak and extra bold pepper corns.

The Sarawak doesn't even need food to accompany it. The smell alone is pure heaven!
Robt,

Thanks a lot for letting me know about the peppercorns. I'm looking forward to trying them!
__________________
Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces.
merstarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2004, 05:56 PM   #24
Senior Cook
 
merstarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
I am a loyal Penzey's follower. I try to order almost everything from them because it's so much better quality than the store-brands and also ends up to be cheaper, usually.

Staples in my house are peppercorns, thyme, cinnamon, vanilla, garlic and onion powder, bay leaves, cumin, chile powder, dried chiles, oregano, several of the curry mixes, allspice berries, ginger, and more stuff that I am forgetting. I also have tried some of their spice blends in small quantities.

Robt is right about the pepper. I ordered both Sarawack and Xspecial awhile ago and the aroma alone put me into the trancelike state I go around in today.

Can't wait for their Boston location.
jennyema,

I'm glad to hear another endorsement of the Sarawak and Extra Special Bold! I'm going to be ordering them soon.
__________________
Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces.
merstarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2004, 07:44 PM   #25
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Since we are talking about peppercorns, can someone give me a basic education on the different types? What the differences are and when you might use one over another? I have to confess that this is one thing I have never learned anything about and it is about time that I do
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2004, 08:33 AM   #26
Executive Chef
 
Raine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: NC
Posts: 3,549
Peppercorns and Pepper

Part 2: Many peppercorn colors and flavors to choose from

Peppercorn varieties
You may be surprised to learn that black, white, and green peppercorns are all the same seed of the same plant in various stages of development and processing. The active ingredient in pepper is piperine, of which a mere twenty parts per million can be detected. The berries grow on spikes, with fifty to sixty berries per spike. Before you ask why cayenne is not included here, it's because cayenne pepper is a capsicum, related to chile peppers.

Black Peppercorns: You may think that these are the mature fruit of the plant. Not so. They have reached their full size, but are not quite ripe. They are picked and allowed to dry in the sun. Enzymes in the berries cause the skin to turn black during the drying process. Strongest in flavor.

White Peppercorns: These are actually the mature berries which ripen to a red color before being picked. After harvesting, they are soaked and rubbed free of the outer skin down to the smooth white underlayer, then dried and bleached by the sun. Slightly milder than black pepper.

Green Peppercorns: This is the unripe version, picked while green and usually pickled in vinegar or brine. You may also find them freeze-dried and dehydrated (more flavorful). Green peppercorns are actually picked at the same stage of ripeness as black peppercorns, but not allowed to dry. Their flavor and spiciness is less concentrated than black peppercorns. Least pungent.

Red Peppercorns: This mature, but unhulled version of the peppercorn is often difficult to find.

Pink Peppercorns: In spite of its moniker, these are unrelated to the black peppercorn. They come from the Baies rose plant (Euonymus phellomanus), imported from Madagascar and as a result, expensive. They are pungent and slightly sweet, but not nearly as flavorful as the real thing. These berries were once banned by the Food and Drug Administration as a foodstuff, but are now considered safe for consumption. This seed is not to be confused with the Brazilian pepper berry below.

Pink Berries: Also often called pink peppercorn, this berry is also unrelated to the black peppercorn. It is the seed of Schinus terebinthifolius, also known as Brazilian pepper tree, Christmas berry, and Florida holly, and is considered a scourge in Florida. The flavor is hardly spicy hot, and more of a sweet menthol and resinous nature. This berry causes allergic reactions in some, particularly children, and can be toxic in large quantities. Not recommended.
__________________
Raine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2004, 09:37 AM   #27
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Thanks Rainee! That is some great info. What I am more looking for though is the differences in the varieties like Tellicherry, Sarawak and Special Extra Bold for instance.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2004, 07:39 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Got my catalogue already. Wow, that was fast.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 06:14 AM   #29
Senior Cook
 
chesterchippy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chester, NH
Posts: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Got my catalogue already. Wow, that was fast.
See? Aren't they wonderful? So - what do you think of the products, catalogue, and information?
__________________
chesterchippy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 08:18 AM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Haven't looked at it yet other than a quick leafing thru. Because of all you fine people who post here every day, I am waaay behind in reading anything that isn't on a computer screen. However, this is not meant as a complaint.
__________________

__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How Do You Store Your Spices and Dried Herbs? choclatechef Cook's Tools 78 11-13-2008 01:06 PM
Fresh Spices The Z General Cooking 11 03-02-2005 06:46 PM
Penzeys hot chocolate... Otter Non-alcoholic Drinks 13 11-01-2004 11:19 AM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.