"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-22-2005, 08:07 AM   #21
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by middie
ronjohn did this not teach you anything ????????


let this be a lesson to you from now on !!! lol
It's ok, soon I will unleash my secret weapon upon my garden, and it's growth will be unstoppable! Muhwahahahahha.....
__________________

__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 10:34 AM   #22
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
by secret weapon, do you mean the extra foam from your homebrews? I hear it's great for lawns.

(PS - just bought a case of the Mandarin Hef - did you ever find any?)
__________________

__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 11:45 AM   #23
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Close! Very Close!

It's the spent grains from my brewing. I either compost them, or during the summer, wait till they're cooled down and dump them in the garden. We get HUGE tomato plants that make really sweet tomatoes. Perfect for cooking!

Haven't found the mandarin hefe yet, but I haven't been to the big beer store to check for it, either.

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 12:23 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,704
ronjohn, do you lime your garden in the fall? i would imagine you soil's ph drops if you add to much organics, unless you compost it first. i cold compost every year. the worms i get for fishing are a nice extra with it.

jkath, have you ever heard of jerry baker? he's the guy who uses beer, dish detergent, hot peppers, cigarette butts and urine to fertilize and get rid of bugs in his yard.
__________________
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 12:42 PM   #25
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
ronjohn, do you lime your garden in the fall? i would imagine you soil's ph drops if you add to much organics, unless you compost it first. i cold compost every year. the worms i get for fishing are a nice extra with it.
Nope, never had to add anything to it. I compost most of it, so it hasn't been an issue. Plus, when you're brewing, the ideal ph is usually about 5.2, and even though you'll probably get a bit of a drop from lactic acid production in the spent grains, it's not enough to really impact the soil. (There's just not enough sugar left in the grain for it to drop too far).

Plus, I do compost the majority ofthe grains, which go into the garden in the fall, after we tear out the plants. So it gets to sit over the winter as well.

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 12:54 PM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,704
oh, hey ronjohn, mind if i pick your brain about beginning brewing? dw asked what i wanted for papa's day, so i asked for my usual (a train set, a horse, an aquarium with bottlenose dolphins, monkeys, a motorcycle, and a home brewing kit.)

she finally agreed to let me try my hand at beer. i am going to this store: www.corradosmarket.com to buy my kit. what would i need to get started, and could eventually expand the system. (i think i should start small, but i don't want one of those bags you hang on the back of a door). also, does glass work better than plastic?
__________________
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 02:04 PM   #27
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
oh, hey ronjohn, mind if i pick your brain about beginning brewing? dw asked what i wanted for papa's day, so i asked for my usual (a train set, a horse, an aquarium with bottlenose dolphins, monkeys, a motorcycle, and a home brewing kit.)

she finally agreed to let me try my hand at beer. i am going to this store: www.corradosmarket.com to buy my kit. what would i need to get started, and could eventually expand the system. (i think i should start small, but i don't want one of those bags you hang on the back of a door). also, does glass work better than plastic?
Cool! All those choices, and she let you have the most expensive one!

I checked out the Brewing kit that they have on their website, looks like it needs everything to get you started. The book it comes with is considered a MUST READ in the homebrewing world. While not 100% technically correct, it does a great job of not making things seem so technical and worrysome that you're afraid to try it. (This is not rocket science, it's just beer)

As for plastic vs glass, that debate still rages among advanced brewers. I use both. For basic beers I find it doesn't really make a difference.

The only thing that the kit doesn't list is a big pot. I'd reccomend skipping the stovetop altogether, and grabbing a big kettle and a propane burner (think fried turkey setups).

If you want more info just give me a shout. We now return you to your regularly scheduled growing tomatos in hay bales tread...

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 02:14 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,704
thanks ronjohn. i will pm you with some more questions, if that's ok. now i need to find someone who knows how to build a giant fish tank...
__________________
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 03:55 PM   #29
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,704
to get back on the topic (sorry crewsk )

the bail of hay is just acting like a combination of a terra cotta pot and a sponge. absorbs some water but also allows oxygen to get to the roots as well. i guess it works well if you add enough soil around the roots. tomatoes do not need to grow a huge root ball to be able to produce fruit.

cats, it sounds like the ground you put your tomatoes in last year was missing the proper balance of nutrients, or were over watered. i hope you (or your hubby) turned in some potting soil, or well rotted compost (with worm castings), or at least peat moss and a good 5 - 10 - 10 fertilizer this year. and watch out for too much nitrogen. you'll get big plants and no or little flavorless fruit. grow corn in that spot the next year to reduce the nitrogen level in the soil.
i've seen tomatoes that grew up in the cracks of a sidewalk in the city, and produced tasty fruit.
__________________
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 04:10 PM   #30
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Buckytom, I have heard of Jerry Baker - actually my Grandma gave me some info about his stuff. Quite interesting, but I really like that guy they had on hgtv (is he still around?) that was the Alton Brown of gardening. He had grey hair and a mustache and did the crazy camera angles and silly stuff but also taught a lot about gardening. I remember him saying that if you have sore feet, to walk around outside in your rubber flip flops after laying down a layer of sliced tomatoes on them first. See, Crewsk, I'm on subject!
__________________

__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.