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Old 01-30-2013, 10:56 AM   #1
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Please Help. I'm new at cooking.

Ok so about 2 weeks ago I shredded 5-10 lbs of potatoes. I noticed they were slightly red/brown after shredding but didn't think anything of it. Then I put the hashbrowns/shredded potatoes in the freezer.

Fast forward to today. I decide to make hashbrowns. I take them out of the freezer and they are completely dark brown/black.

What do I do? Can I still eat them or are they ruined?

Any replies are appreciated. Thanks.

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Old 01-30-2013, 11:03 AM   #2
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Yes they are ruined. Potatoes are notoriously difficult to freeze in any form. You exposed the starch in the potatoes to the air and it turned brown. Freezing the moisture in potatoes just ruins the texture too boot. Sorry about that. Even people who attempt to freeze soup that contains potatoes end up with a 'slimy' soup. IMO if you want to be able to take a few frozen potato 'somethings' out of the freezer buy some commercially made ones. They do something to make them palatable......just. LOL
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:11 AM   #3
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Thanks for the reply. I have no clue what I'm doing so I definitely appreciate the help.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:16 AM   #4
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. They do something to make them palatable......just. LOL
Sulfates, sulfites, sulphides, and I think they are all IQF nowadays..soo, yeah..what puffin3 said. Just buy some frozen product. One less headache on a Sunday morning...

Or, you could make them fresh. Which would be a bit more involved...
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:28 AM   #5
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potatoes have a long shelf life. Store them in a cool, not refrigerated place until ready to use. For hash browns, prepare however many you need for a meal. You can also boil / cook potatoes, cool and then shred for hash browns as they can be made with either cooked or raw potatoes. Depends on your taste. Cooked potatoes may be stored covered in the frig a day or two ahead. Saves time when it comes to shredding and frying. Try them both ways sometime.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:58 PM   #6
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Shredded potatoes do not freeze well.

Keep any kind of cut potatoes in water as you process them to prevent oxydization.

Once you've shredded them all squeeze out all of the water with dish towels or a salad spinner before you cook them.
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:19 PM   #7
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Shredded potatoes do not freeze well.

Keep any kind of cut potatoes in water as you process them to prevent oxydization.

Once you've shredded them all squeeze out all of the water with dish towels or a salad spinner before you cook them.
Excellent advice. It is the starch in the potato that is the problem. By soaking them in water, you will notice that there is some starch in the bottom when you go to use the shredded potato.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:28 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
potatoes have a long shelf life. Store them in a cool, not refrigerated place until ready to use. For hash browns, prepare however many you need for a meal. You can also boil / cook potatoes, cool and then shred for hash browns as they can be made with either cooked or raw potatoes. Depends on your taste. Cooked potatoes may be stored covered in the frig a day or two ahead. Saves time when it comes to shredding and frying. Try them both ways sometime.
Excellent advice! My mom's always got a few cooked potatoes in her fridge. That way she can just shred/slice/cube/mash when she needs them. If they're going to be shredded, just undercook them a bit, so they stay in nice shreds :)

I personally wouldn't buy the pre-made kind - because they put all types of chemicals in their packages to keep the product from turning brown, etc. Better to go with the real thing
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:49 PM   #9
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Excellent advice! My mom's always got a few cooked potatoes in her fridge. That way she can just shred/slice/cube/mash when she needs them. If they're going to be shredded, just undercook them a bit, so they stay in nice shreds :)

I personally wouldn't buy the pre-made kind - because they put all types of chemicals in their packages to keep the product from turning brown, etc. Better to go with the real thing
Every so often I get a hankering for a breakfast like I can get at the local eatery. So I boil up a couple of potatoes and keep then in the fridge. Then I know they are ready for me when I want them. Home fries! YUM! I just leave the skin on them and peel when needed.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:25 PM   #10
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Every so often I get a hankering for a breakfast like I can get at the local eatery. So I boil up a couple of potatoes and keep then in the fridge. Then I know they are ready for me when I want them. Home fries! YUM! I just leave the skin on them and peel when needed.
When I bake potatoes I make extra and refrigerate. That way I can make home fries the next day for breakfast. Same idea as yours, but baked instead of boiled. And...I leave the skins on too!
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