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Old 10-13-2011, 10:22 AM   #11
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Keds, try a cheaper cut of meat. A piece of meat that needs longer to break down would work better for you. Blade maybe? or Round roast?

I'm not familiar with timers on crockpots, but that might not be a bad idea. You can set your timer to move to a different setting once you finish the cooking part.

Coke is like adding vinegar, or another acid to your liquid. It tenderized the meat. I personally don't care for the flavor, but that's just me.
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:08 AM   #12
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I have to leave it that long - I leave the house around 6:30, and get home no earlier than 5. Is there a better cut of meat to use? If I use chuck, should I use my crock with a timer and do high (or low) for a certain time, and have it go to warm?

Thank you so much for everybody's help!

(Also, what does Coke do to a roast?)
Since you have to leave it in for so long, have the roast be somewhat icy (not frozen solid, just icy) when you put it into the crock. Yes, this is completely safe to do. Also, don't cover it with water. You are roasting it, not braising it. A small amount (1/2 cup) of liquid in the bottom of the crock is more than enough. If you can, set a timer to have the crock come on a couple hours after you load it, that will help reduce the total cooking time. Remember, since the roast is icy it will remain at safe temp until the crock comes on. And, if your crock is programmable, then by all means have it switch to warm for the last hour or so before service.
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:21 AM   #13
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I generally use any tough piece of meat, add carrots, celery, onions, mushrooms, spices, and a can of tomatoes, I sometimes add a little bit of beef broth. I cook it in my crock pot for about 6-8 hours on low. That always does the trick, the meat is always falling apart and delicious.
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:29 AM   #14
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Since you have to leave it in for so long, have the roast be somewhat icy (not frozen solid, just icy) when you put it into the crock. Yes, this is completely safe to do. Also, don't cover it with water. You are roasting it, not braising it. A small amount (1/2 cup) of liquid in the bottom of the crock is more than enough. If you can, set a timer to have the crock come on a couple hours after you load it, that will help reduce the total cooking time. Remember, since the roast is icy it will remain at safe temp until the crock comes on. And, if your crock is programmable, then by all means have it switch to warm for the last hour or so before service.

A pot roast, as opposed to an oven roast, is by definition braised and not roasted.

So you will need some liquid in the crock. Probably a cup. I'd suggest beef broth with a litle red wine in it. And a hit of soy sauce. The cooking meat will give up its juices so you will end up with lots more liquid in the end.

Cooking any cut of beef that long is going to dry it out, for sure. If you have to cook it for that long, buy the fattiest cut like chuck, since the process of rendering the fat during cooking helps keep it moist. A lean cut like round will end up very tough and dry after 10 hours.

The liquid you have left after cooking will be very flavorful, since you've basically made a beef broth by expelling the liquid and flavor fromthe meat into the cooking liquid. Degrease it and make gravy, which may help.

I would definitely make absolutely sure your "warm" setting consistantly keeps the food above 140 degrees, too, or you may risk food poisoning.
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Old 10-13-2011, 12:02 PM   #15
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A pot roast, as opposed to an oven roast, is by definition braised and not roasted.
But only if it sits in the liquid, correct? At least, that's my understanding of a braise. To me, 1 cup of liquid will result in a braise and that's why I suggested only the 1/2 cup. If the meat rests on top of the veggies, then it is out of the liquid.
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Old 10-13-2011, 12:22 PM   #16
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But only if it sits in the liquid, correct? At least, that's my understanding of a braise. To me, 1 cup of liquid will result in a braise and that's why I suggested only the 1/2 cup. If the meat rests on top of the veggies, then it is out of the liquid.
If you cook protein in liquid in a tighly covered cooking vessel at a low temp, you are braising.

Crockpots braise, not roast meat. Roasting uses dry, higher heat -- much higher than you could achieve in a crockpot. ANd you roast uncovered. And a pot roast, by definition, is a braised dish.

The meat itself will give off its juices so it will braise even if no liquid is added. And it will steam even if it's not sitting in the liquid, although its better if it does sit in it, flavor-wise.

Now I'm wondering about potatoes cooked for 10 hours ....
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Old 10-13-2011, 01:33 PM   #17
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So, if I put my chunk of meat in one of these:

and use it in the oven, I'm braising? Then why is called a "roaster"? Is it only a roaster when the lid is off? Trying to understand where the fine line is between roasting and braising. Is it only about the lid?
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Old 10-13-2011, 01:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
So, if I put my chunk of meat in one of these:

and use it in the oven, I'm braising? Then why is called a "roaster"? Is it only a roaster when the lid is off? Trying to understand where the fine line is between roasting and braising. Is it only about the lid?

Roasting is high heat, keeping the meat elevated, such as on a bed of mirepoix, or, on your included rack. The key is air circulation around the protien. That vessel IS a roaster, w/ a lid. Any pan can really be a roaster.

The second you introduce liquid, cover, and simmer, then you are braising. OR, if you have rendered out the natrual jus, cover and simmer, you are braising.
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Old 10-13-2011, 01:46 PM   #19
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Pot "Roast" more than likely refers to the large cut of meat/joint. Any "big" piece of meat was a "roast", doing it in a pot=pot roast. Also, braising of meat, in a covered vessel, has been called pot roasting. . .

another quick distinction: Braising is all about breaking down connective tissue. Roasting is all about caramelization, and ending in a desired temp, like medium rare. . .
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Old 10-13-2011, 03:23 PM   #20
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My DH prefers the English cut roasts. I don't really know what the difference is in the cut but it sure is a beautiful piece of meat. I love the way it shreds for sandwiches, cold or hot as in BBQ. I braise it for four hours in an iron DO on the wood heater and it comes out perfect every time. Good luck.
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