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Old 11-19-2011, 10:23 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by TATTRAT
10 hours is going to render ANY cut tough, and dry as a dessert. . .even if it was cooked covered in liquid. Chuck is really lean, the cooking process should stop as soon as it is tender, and the carry over cooking will help it finish to fork tender.
I've heard coke instead of water can keep a roast moist longer than water, but not sure even that could go ten hours
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Old 11-19-2011, 10:50 PM   #32
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Chuck is actually not lean at all...full of fat and connective tissue....a low braise for a 3-4 poud Chuck roast...low and slow...should take about 3-4 hrs....I like to let it get to room temp in it's braising liquid...allows the roast to re-absorb the juice....wrap the roast separate from liquids....now 10 hrs is crazy.....no going back.....once over-boiled...just a rock....no worries...next time you'll see it will be great! Good Luck!!!!
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:48 AM   #33
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Wow, this is a LOT of helpful info - thank you everyone! I"ve been afraid to use my fairly new slow cooker now....maybe I'll keep it only for vegetarian stews, chilis etc...hehe. I suspect it does cook too hot. Roasting in the oven, or braising seems to work much better.

I did a small prime rib beef roast in one of those blue roasting pans, sitting on top of a metal rack with 1/2 cup of water underneath, for 2 hours = beautiful, soft, tender, juicy meat.

But I still have a 3 pound chunk of that fatless "brisket" meat in the freezer, so I might give it another go....but NOT in a slow cooker. I'll try braising it.

Thanks again - I am really enjoying this forum!
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Old 11-20-2011, 09:25 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bikergal34 View Post
Chuck is actually not lean at all...full of fat and connective tissue....a low braise for a 3-4 poud Chuck roast...low and slow...should take about 3-4 hrs....I like to let it get to room temp in it's braising liquid...allows the roast to re-absorb the juice....wrap the roast separate from liquids....now 10 hrs is crazy.....no going back.....once over-boiled...just a rock....no worries...next time you'll see it will be great! Good Luck!!!!
+1
We recently finished eating a pot roast made from a 4 lb. bottom round cooked simmering in a covered Dutch oven for 3.5 hours, half covered in water with Minors' beef base, caramelized onions, 2 Tbs of sweet paprika, and 2 Tbs of hot paprika.
After the 3.5 hours the meat was removed to a bowl and the cooking liquid was reduced, added to some browned flour and then enriched with sour cream.
The resulting sauce was added to the bowl containing the meat.
The bowl was then cooled and placed in the refrigerator.
The following evening 1/3 of the pot roast was sliced, reheated in some of the sauce and served with noodles. It was dry and tough.
Same thing on the next day.
On the last day we sliced the remaining meat more thinly, gently reheated for nearly an hour and served as described above. It was moist, tasty and tender.
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Old 11-21-2011, 08:48 PM   #35
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Make sure you slice it across the grain. If you slice with the grain, it will add to the toughness.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:14 AM   #36
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Wow Bill, that sounds incredible!...on the third day it turned tender, after two days of tough eating?? what do you think this can be attributed to? (not rot, I assume, ) cuz it should still be fresh after 3 days in fridge....but: what then?
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:23 AM   #37
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I attribute day 3's tenderness to the sour cream sauce marination and the lengthy reheating of the thin slices.
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