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Old 12-23-2013, 03:50 PM   #1
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Poutine

Does anyone here make this? I've never had it but I lust after it anyway!

Here is Wiki's description of it:
Poutine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

My hankering for it just got a boost when I found out that Trader Joe's is now carrying it. I won't be able to go to my TJ's until after Christmas and I'm not sure all TJ's will carry it.

Trader Joe's Now Sells Poutine, and it's Awesome | Serious Eats

I can buy cheese curds here and I like Ore-Ida's Crispy Fast Food Fries so all I need is a gravy. (Please don't tell me gravy is easy to make! Maybe for you.......) Any way for the Gravy Challenged to buy a packaged gravy mix and make it good enough?
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Old 12-23-2013, 03:56 PM   #2
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Check out some of CWS's threads, she mentions poutine. I've never had it.
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Old 12-23-2013, 03:58 PM   #3
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I had it the last time I was in Canada. French fries, gravy and curds, what could be bad about that? It tastes great but if you have a problem with soggy fries, it will negatively effect your enjoyment of this dish.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:37 PM   #4
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Like anything else, there is good poutine and bad poutine. It all depends where you get it. I may eat a bit of it a couple of times a year. Like everything else you need to source out the quality of the ingredients. Real curds, and a good home made gravy. The chips should be good and crispy to hold up to the gravy, or otherwise it is soggy. Which is where the good quality gravy comes into play. As long as the gravy is tasty, you can look past the soggy fries. Most places use gravy mixes and frozen fries. They even make a poutine curd now. I would try and get my hands on real curds. If all of the components are top notch, it can be a real winner....
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:19 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Like anything else, there is good poutine and bad poutine. It all depends where you get it. I may eat a bit of it a couple of times a year. Like everything else you need to source out the quality of the ingredients. Real curds, and a good home made gravy. The chips should be good and crispy to hold up to the gravy, or otherwise it is soggy. Which is where the good quality gravy comes into play. As long as the gravy is tasty, you can look past the soggy fries. Most places use gravy mixes and frozen fries. They even make a poutine curd now. I would try and get my hands on real curds. If all of the components are top notch, it can be a real winner....
Absolutely. Mrs D loves poutine and according to her, the best around here is NY Fries. Hand cut fries, fresh real curds and a really tasty gravy.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:01 PM   #6
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Wow, thank you all for your replies! I just KNOW I'm going to like it but it's too bad I can't go to Canada to get the real deal.

I'll guess I'll just have to experiment with package brown gravy and tweak that a bit to make it mo' bettah.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:03 PM   #7
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You can make the same thing no matter where you are. It's not just a Canadian thing. It may have been invented here, but that's about it. I have had some crappy poutine up here.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:50 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Like anything else, there is good poutine and bad poutine. It all depends where you get it. I may eat a bit of it a couple of times a year. Like everything else you need to source out the quality of the ingredients. Real curds, and a good home made gravy. The chips should be good and crispy to hold up to the gravy, or otherwise it is soggy. Which is where the good quality gravy comes into play. As long as the gravy is tasty, you can look past the soggy fries. Most places use gravy mixes and frozen fries. They even make a poutine curd now. I would try and get my hands on real curds. If all of the components are top notch, it can be a real winner....
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
You can make the same thing no matter where you are. It's not just a Canadian thing. It may have been invented here, but that's about it. I have had some crappy poutine up here.
I make it on occasion with oven baked fries. I think the hard part, outside of Canada and dairy country, is getting the cheese curds. If I couldn't get fresh curds, I would grate some cheddar onto the fries before adding the gravy.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:00 PM   #9
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Definitely it is the gravy. When I make venison roast, I make a gravy to which I add gjetost and lingonberry sauce. Love poutine with turkey gravy and leftover turkey added. Love adding hotpeppers or fresh jalapeno peppers on top.

Some poutine variations:

Poutine Recipes From TPoutine - AskMen

38 Poutine Dishes That Will Knock Your Canadian Socks Off |Foodbeast

How to Cook Poutine, Quebec

Poutine: Where the Good Fries Go | Food Republic
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:47 PM   #10
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Perfect gravy isn't hard. There are actually two ways to achieve perfect gravy. The first method, and the one I use for poutine goes like this:

Obtain 2 cups of your favorite broth, be it chicken, turkey, beef, pork, or moose (I made my last poutine with moose ). Put it a pot and get it hot.

While the broth is heating, add 2 tbs. salted butter to a pan, and melt over low heat. When it is melted, add 2 tbs. flour to the pan and stir until everything is combined, no lumps. This is called a roux, for any that don't already know this. Let this mixture brown lightly. Now, add a ladle-full of broth to the roux and stir until the liquid is completely absorbed into the roux. It should be thick. Continue adding broth to the roux until it is smooth and creamy, yet thick enough to coat a spoon. If made with chicken, veal, or pork broth, this is called a Veloute'. Most of us just call it gravy. Remove from the heat. Serve over those crispy french-fries and cheddar cheese curds.

2nd Gravy technique:
Heat 2 cups of broth or stock until boiling. While its heating up, mix 2 tbs. cornstarch with 4 tbs. of cold water. Stir until it's smooth. This is called a slurry. When the broth is boiling, pour the slurry into the pan and stir. The gravy will thicken nicely. If you need to make it thicker, make more slurry and stir it into the gravy. Serve over whatever you need to serve gravy over.

Crispy home-made french fries:
Bring three cups of water to a boil.
Start with long, russet potatoes. Wash them, then peel them if you don't want' the skins on. Slice into three slices, lengthwise. Turn them so the slices are parallel to the cutting board. Slice lengthwise into three pieces again. Now place the potatoes into the boiling water and boil for seven minutes.

While the spuds are boiling, heat 3 to 4 inches of cooking oil to 370 F.

After the seven minutes have passed, remove the potatoes from the hot water, and place on a rack to dry for a minute or so. Now, carefully immerse the fries into the hot oil and cook until lightly browned. When done, remove from the oil and drain on paper towels. Place onto a plate, top with cheese curds, then gravy. Now you have poutine.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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