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Old 12-20-2012, 11:27 AM   #11
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First let me say, a Prime Rib Roast should not need to be tenderized, after all its a tender cut of meat. If it is not frozen, season it over night in the refrigerator and take it out about an hour before cooking. Just let it get to room temp. I cook it at a fairly high temp, 450 degrees, until the internal temp reaches 125 to 130 degrees, then cover and let it rest in a large cooler for at least 15 minutes before serving.
Just a thought, bacteria grows fastest at room temp and will accelerate as time passes.
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:39 AM   #12
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Just to say, I've left a small, two-rib prime rib roast out on my counter in a warm house for 7+ hours and it was still 55F internal temp. You might be able to get a steak close to room temp in an hour or so, but not a roast.
I see a lot of recipes for roasts saying to take it out of the fridge an hour before cooking to "get it room temp" and I can only think they never actually checked the temperature. I just wanted to mention this. Unless my idea of room temp is too literal
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:42 AM   #13
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There is some evidence that warming the roast to 'room temperature' makes no difference how it cooks.
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:47 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
There is some evidence that warming the roast to 'room temperature' makes no difference how it cooks.
It might when using the "perfect prime rib" recipe. The one that calls for high temps at first, then turning the oven off for a a couple hours.

But other than that I have to agree. I don't even warm the ribs going into the smoker. I figure the longer it takes to warm them up, the better smoke ring they will get. (that whole, over 140F can't accept anymore smoke thing)
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:50 AM   #15
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Quote:
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There is some evidence that warming the roast to 'room temperature' makes no difference how it cooks.
I think the only difference is that it cooks more evenly and takes less time to reach internal temps. Not that its a big deal with a roast, but when cooking a thick steak it pays.
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Old 12-20-2012, 02:54 PM   #16
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I am not as concern about bacteria and all, but i have never heard of this practice. Warming up meat to the room temperature maybe, definite maybe, but you are basically suggesting preheating the meat. Doubt it is the reason for tender result.
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Old 12-20-2012, 03:47 PM   #17
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The basic goal of most recipes is to uniformly heat the roast to about 130 degrees F without overcooking the outer layers. It occurred to me that if I raised the temp of the entire roast to about 90 degrees by immersion in hot water, then it would be easier to uniformly heat the entire roast to 130 in the oven. I still want to use the oven because I want the surface to be browned.
I agree with the Pacanis that just leaving the roast on the counter at room temp for a few hours as is recommended in most recipes still leaves the center cold and does not solve the problem.
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Old 12-20-2012, 03:50 PM   #18
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I think you're wasting your time. When the warm roast goes in the oven, the outer surface of the roast is going to get really hot and the heat will transfer slowly through the roast towards the center. The center will always be the last to get done. Meanwhile, the outer surface is cooking more.
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Old 12-20-2012, 03:56 PM   #19
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The basic goal of most recipes is to uniformly heat the roast to about 130 degrees F without overcooking the outer layers. It occurred to me that if I raised the temp of the entire roast to about 90 degrees by immersion in hot water, then it would be easier to uniformly heat the entire roast to 130 in the oven. I still want to use the oven because I want the surface to be browned.
I agree with the Pacanis that just leaving the roast on the counter at room temp for a few hours as is recommended in most recipes still leaves the center cold and does not solve the problem.
You sound so determent to do what you want that I do not understand why you even bother asking the question. Everybody is telling not to do it and you keep insisting. Just do what you think is good for you. You are not building an atomic reactor, it is just a roast.
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Old 12-20-2012, 04:01 PM   #20
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The heating of the outer surface depends on the time and temperature of the oven. If the center of the roast is starting at, say, 100 degrees, and the oven temperature is 300, then it will take about one third as long to raise the center to 130 compared to if the center is 35 degrees (refrigerator temp). In addition, the temperature of the roast should be much more uniform because of the reduced cooking time.
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