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Old 12-19-2012, 06:29 PM   #1
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Pre-warming Rib Roast in hot water?

I have discovered that I can a get remarkably tender large turkey by pre-warming it in hot water in a water tight bag for a few hours before placing in oven.
I am thinking about trying this with a standing rib roast. My idea is to seal it in bag, immerse in hot water for an hour or so to bring internal temperature to about 90 to 100 degrees F. Then, put it in a hot oven to brown the outside. Anyone have any ideas or experience with this? I do not want to spoil an expensive roast or to ruin the Christmas dinner.

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Old 12-19-2012, 07:47 PM   #2
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Sounds like you are close to Sous Vide cooking.
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:26 PM   #3
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Hi and welcome to DC.

That's a very dangerous practice. You're holding food in the temperature range where bacteria grow quickly and can cause illness, especially with poultry.

I get tender, juicy turkey by roasting it the traditional way. I don't cook a lot of beef roasts, since there's only two of us, but I'm sure someone else will weigh in.
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Old 12-19-2012, 09:37 PM   #4
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Do not agree - 2 hours not a dangerous time

Although I do not know much about cooking, I do know something about microbiology. Bacteria have a lag time when put in a growth medium before they start growing. For most bacteria when placed in ideal growth medium, this is two or more hours. It certainly will be longer for bacteria that are starting at near freezing (refrigerator temp) and slowly warmed. I know that this fear of keeping any meat at room temp even an hour is very common, it is just not true.
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Old 12-19-2012, 09:49 PM   #5
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Not really Sous-vide

As I understand it, Sous-vide is cooking entirely in a water bath. I want to have the standard browned surface, so it needs to go into a hot oven. I thought that by pre-warming the interior I could braise the surface while still keeping the interior rare.
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Old 12-19-2012, 10:46 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandhill View Post
Although I do not know much about cooking, I do know something about microbiology. Bacteria have a lag time when put in a growth medium before they start growing. For most bacteria when placed in ideal growth medium, this is two or more hours. It certainly will be longer for bacteria that are starting at near freezing (refrigerator temp) and slowly warmed. I know that this fear of keeping any meat at room temp even an hour is very common, it is just not true.
It's not a fear but knowledge on my part Do you have a source for this lag time?
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Old 12-19-2012, 10:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandhill View Post
As I understand it, Sous-vide is cooking entirely in a water bath. I want to have the standard browned surface, so it needs to go into a hot oven. I thought that by pre-warming the interior I could braise the surface while still keeping the interior rare.
Braising is cooking the meat for a long time, partially submerged in liquid, at a low temperature.

I''ve never heard of pre-warming and I don't see any benefit to it. This sounds like a good method: http://www.delish.com/_mobile/recipe...b-roast-recipe
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Old 12-19-2012, 11:52 PM   #8
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You're basically doing "beer cooler sous vide". This works great with smaller cuts of meat but isn't ideal with a whole roast. It helps a lot of you have a way to create an airtight seal- that way, once you kill the bacteria on the surface it won't be re-contaminated later on.

Again, this isn't something I advocate but if you're going to do it, you're wise to immerse the entire roast in very hot water (close to boiling) for a minute or two first. This should kill any bacteria on the surface. It doesn't matter if you "overcook" it because in a very short time only the outside will get hot, the heat won't penetrate. You'll be finishing it in a hot oven anyways.

If you can seal it you're gonna be a lot safer; your technique should probably be limited to stuff you buy already sealed unless you have a sealer that can accommodate the large cut of meat you want to use.
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Old 12-20-2012, 12:14 AM   #9
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Source for lag time

Here is source for lag time of about 2 hours in salmonella:

Zombie Bacteria - Lag Phase In Salmonella
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Old 12-20-2012, 12:44 AM   #10
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A turkey for more than 2 hours is dangerous. And I don't think that "pre-warming" is the secret to tenderness.

A beef roast warming for an hour is probably ok.
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