"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-03-2011, 08:13 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Q phail

Today I made some bbq baby back ribs. I did it on a webber kettle. I started with a small amount of charcoal briquets and add a few more each hour. I bought hickory chunks. I wrapped up 2 large chunks separately in foil to prevent catching on fire. I added one chunk to the charcoal each hour.

The kettle's internal temperature started at about 270 and dropped down slowly as time goes on (at the end of 5 hours it was about 200 degrees), I kept the top vent wide open. I followed the 2-2-1 rule for babybacks, 2 hours exposed to smoke, 2 hours wrapped in foil (I added some beer to the foil pouch), and 1 hour exposed and brushed with sauce.

The end product was not fall-off-the-bone tender and was extremely salty (on the edge of inedibility) since I wasn't sure how much of my rub to add. The smoke flavor was very strong and overwhelming. I only let the rubbed rib rest for 2 hours before putting on the grill.

I feel defeated :)

__________________

__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2011, 09:05 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Just some very general comments.

I have never had salty ribs, but then, none of my rubs contain salt. Did yours? If not I have no idea why they tasted salty.

Without a pic it is hard to comment on their texture. Did they bend over limply when you picked them up with the tongs, bone side up? How much bone was exposed after the meat started to pull back? Could you tear them apart easily? They were done anyway, right?

Hickory is a strong smoke. I am not familiar with using chunks so can't comment on your method.

I'm not very sure on your adding charcoal method either. For a short burn for ribs you should have been able to load and go.

BUT, it's a starting point. It was not a failure if you can adjust what you want for next time. Learning temp control is key and will come with practice.

IMO.
__________________

__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2011, 09:47 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Just some very general comments.

I have never had salty ribs, but then, none of my rubs contain salt. Did yours? If not I have no idea why they tasted salty.

Without a pic it is hard to comment on their texture. Did they bend over limply when you picked them up with the tongs, bone side up? How much bone was exposed after the meat started to pull back? Could you tear them apart easily? They were done anyway, right?

Hickory is a strong smoke. I am not familiar with using chunks so can't comment on your method.

I'm not very sure on your adding charcoal method either. For a short burn for ribs you should have been able to load and go.

BUT, it's a starting point. It was not a failure if you can adjust what you want for next time. Learning temp control is key and will come with practice.

IMO.
the meat was done, and wasn't rubbery or anything. it was just not tender like how braised meat should be. after I eat the meat, there's still leftover tissue on the bone. There was NO bone exposed, the rack looks the same way it was before cooking.
__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 01:10 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 9,634
Several variables to deal with here. It looks to me like your ribs were undercooked. How and where did you monitor your temperature?
__________________
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 02:24 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Several variables to deal with here. It looks to me like your ribs were undercooked. How and where did you monitor your temperature?
I stick a probe thermometer into the grill through the top vent. it should monitor the temperature of the middle section of the dome
__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 07:16 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
You will need to monitor the temperature of your cooker at grate level...where the meat is ~ Not in the "middle section of the dome"

Luck!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 09:41 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,787
Don't feel bad. Chalk it all up to experience. You probably learned some valuable lessons. This technique isn't easy and requires lots of practice. There are also many variables that you need to take into consideration. If you like the texture of braised meats, then you won't achieve it with this method. I have already inquired and experimented numerous times. And not every technique is for everybody. Personally, I don't find the time it takes to be worth it. But, that's just me.
__________________
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 12:07 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 9,634
If doing ribs on the kettle is new to you I strongly suggest doing them at high heat.....around 350F. Tightly bank a full chimney worth of charcoal on just one side of the kettle (not all fully lit at once) and let the temp settle in at 350. After the white charcoal smoke clears (perhaps 15 min), place a chunk of smoke wood on the coals.
Then place your ribs on the indirect side, lid vent holes (completely open) directly above the ribs opposite the coals. Your ribs should be done in way under 3 hours.

You will not have to replenish charcoal at all if you start out with a full chimney load. Also, it's so much easier to maintain 350F on the kettle for 3 hours than trying to maintain 275F for 5 hours, for instance.
__________________
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 02:12 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Don't feel bad. Chalk it all up to experience. You probably learned some valuable lessons. This technique isn't easy and requires lots of practice. There are also many variables that you need to take into consideration. If you like the texture of braised meats, then you won't achieve it with this method. I have already inquired and experimented numerous times. And not every technique is for everybody. Personally, I don't find the time it takes to be worth it. But, that's just me.
in most bbq restaurants I ate at, the ribs there are braised meat-tender. I guess they probably didn't even cook them on the smoker since they didn't taste very smokey at all. I think they probably cooked the ribs in the oven.

However, I have another doubt. Braised meat becomes super tender not only because of the low and slow method, but also the structure of the meat. The meat that's best for braising is those with lots of connective tissue and collagen, which melts and resulting in a product with tissues not "connected" to each other. On the other hand, if you try to low-and-slow a piece of tender meat such as ribeye and tenderloin, the end product will be very tough since there's not much connective tissue to breakdown. Is baby back ribs considered good for braising? Or maybe spare ribs are better for it?
__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2011, 02:18 PM   #10
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Several variables to deal with here. It looks to me like your ribs were undercooked. How and where did you monitor your temperature?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
You will need to monitor the temperature of your cooker at grate level...where the meat is ~ Not in the "middle section of the dome"

Luck!
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
If doing ribs on the kettle is new to you I strongly suggest doing them at high heat.....around 350F. Tightly bank a full chimney worth of charcoal on just one side of the kettle (not all fully lit at once) and let the temp settle in at 350. After the white charcoal smoke clears (perhaps 15 min), place a chunk of smoke wood on the coals.
I've seen pictures of grilling/smoking and most pics show a thermometer stuck in a potato...Why?

Will someone explain this to me?
__________________

__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.