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Old 08-30-2008, 01:10 PM   #1
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Question about Brining

I just bought a bone-out center top loin roast and I want to brine it. Should I leave it whole or cut the chops first, or does it matter? Also, it's equal parts salt/sugar in the water too?

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Old 08-30-2008, 01:17 PM   #2
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First, I assume we're talking pork.

If you intend to cut the loin into chops and freeze them, don't brine them. If you're going to cook them all, brine them after cutting them into chops.

Pork chops only need a couple of hours in brine to be ready.

I think the sugar is usually half as much as the salt but brine recipes vary all over the place depending on the flavors you want in your meat.
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Old 08-30-2008, 01:30 PM   #3
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  • Vanilla Brine for Pork
    Recipe from Bruce Aidells' "The Complete Meat Cookbook" (Houghton Mifflin)

    1/2 cup salt
    1/2 cup sugar
    2 cups hot water
    7 cups cold water
    2 1/2 teaspoons
    vanilla extract
    2 tablespoons
    fresh ground black pepper

    1. Trim excess fat from the meat.
    2. Place the salt ad sugar in a plastic storage tub and stir in the hot water until all the crystals are dissolved. Add the vanilla and the black pepper.
    3. Cool in the refrigerator until 45F. (This can be done up to several days ahead)
    4. Add meat and refrigerate for the necessary time (see note).
    5. Remove meat and pat dry. Grill at once.
    6. Cook until the internal temperature is 145-150 (use quick read thermometer). Remove from heat and allow to rest for at least 10 minutes.

    This brine will suffice for a 4-6 pound roast or 6-8 thick chops.

    Bruce Aidells' Tips For pork chops that are brined and cooked on the grill: Chops should be at least an inch thick, even an inch and a quarter to an inch and a half for better results. Any thinner and the chops will be too easily overcooked and dry out on the grill.

    The amount of time you brine a piece of meat is dependent on the thickness of the meat. Here are some guidelines to use as a rule of thumb:

    Pork chops (at least 1" thick) -- -- 4 to 6 hours in the brine

    Pork chops (1 1/4" - 1 1/2" thick) -- -- 5 to 8 hours in the brine

    Pork tenderloin -- -- 4 to 6 hours 4-6 pound bone in pork roast -- -- 2 to 3 days in the brine

    Experiment with the times in the brine and above all, let your taste be your guide.
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Old 08-30-2008, 01:43 PM   #4
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I was always told equal parts sugar and salt but if you want it to be eitehr salty or sweet you adjust from there.

you can always taste your brine before you put the pork in it.
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Old 08-30-2008, 03:29 PM   #5
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Here's another:

1 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1 gallon vegetable stock
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
1/2 tablespoon allspice berries
1/2 tablespoon candied ginger
1 gallon iced water
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