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Old 07-17-2006, 02:13 AM   #21
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I have never seen beef rendered fat in of the stores I go to, either. I have rendered it down at home to use in recipes for beef. Yep, the method he is using is confit, not deepfrying. I would think it would be easier done in the oven, though.
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Old 07-17-2006, 03:23 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Constance
Ishbel...me again. I'm watching Paula Deen in London, and she's in a butcher shope, looking at bacon. She says the English have something they call "back bacon", which is wider and has more meat running through it. Can you tell us about it?
I don't know Paula Deen, Constance - but 'back bacon' is a larger rasher than 'streaky'. We have smoked and unsmoked bacon. I believe British bacon is more like the type that Americans call Canadian (don't know if it's cos the bacon is FROM Canada, or the way it may be cured!).

I haven't eaten American bacon for many years - it was so different to the stuff I am used to that I only tried it a couple of times... and anyway, it's not good for me nowadays!

Constance: here's a wikipedia piece on the differences between bacons! And isn't it odd that, according to Wiki, 'Canadian' bacon is unknown as CB in Canada?! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon
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Old 07-17-2006, 07:44 PM   #23
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Since you had mentioned LARD, I was wondering where you go to get it in the South? I live in SC and the last time I tried to find lard I was sent to the Crisco. Any suggestions?
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Old 07-17-2006, 08:17 PM   #24
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I can't imagine anyone having a problem finding lard anywhere in the South! But, that doesn't mean that some stores may not carry it. I have 6 grocery stores on my side of town that I shop at and only 1 (very small store) doesn't carry it, or if they do I just haven't seen it. Three stores have it next to the Crisco, one has it in the Ethnic Foods section, and one keeps moving it around ... I once found it back in the refrigerated case with the butter and margarine.
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Old 07-17-2006, 10:59 PM   #25
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All the grocery stores I visit in our area of NC have lard. Most of the time it's next to the Crisco and other shortenings but if not then it's in the Hispanic section.
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Old 07-18-2006, 02:59 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Ishbel...me again. I'm watching Paula Deen in London, and she's in a butcher shope, looking at bacon. She says the English have something they call "back bacon", which is wider and has more meat running through it. Can you tell us about it?
Back bacon is what is commonly referred to in the states as Canadian bacon. Which isn't really what we use for bacon. We use the same old side bacon that the Americans use for our bacon recipes. Canadian bacon is reserved for use with eggs benny and such.
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Old 07-18-2006, 05:15 AM   #27
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Have any of you tried the bacon that is lined with black pepper. Its like
pastramy. its the best bacon I have ever had. My dogs just love it.
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Old 07-18-2006, 06:20 AM   #28
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This is the usual way we buy suet (although I can buy it grated/shredded dierctly from my local butcher) - here is a picture of the box, which might be sold locally - although this is a US site for mail order.

http://www.britsuperstore.com/acatalog/Atora_Suet.html
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Old 07-18-2006, 07:40 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
This is the usual way we buy suet (although I can buy it grated/shredded dierctly from my local butcher) - here is a picture of the box, which might be sold locally - although this is a US site for mail order.

http://www.britsuperstore.com/acatalog/Atora_Suet.html
If I did the math right 3lbs. would cost $16.47 US. If I understood your earlier post, suet is primarily a baking item and you would buy "beef lard" to fry with or make a confit. Did I understand you correctly?
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Old 07-18-2006, 08:52 AM   #30
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I wouldn't ever buy lard to fry things with! The suet is used mostly for dumplings for meat dishes, for suet puddings like jam roly-poly and for suet crust pastries for steam puddings.

I wouldn't get through 3 lb of suet in 3 or 4 years! Most of my recipes add about a quarter pound to the flour - at most, half a pound... and I would only make such dishes 2 or 3 times a winter!
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