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Old 01-07-2013, 10:50 AM   #11
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The 'classic' roux flour/clarified butter mixture should look like a sandy dry white lump when it's finished. Then it's cooled then into a medium hot pan then any hot liquid is added all at once to the flour/butter mixture and then whisked into the liquid. Anything that looks like a liquid wall paper paste before the liquid is added is not going to result in a classic roux. It will be something but not a 'roux'.
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:58 AM   #12
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While I'm not disputing your recipe, I know there is more than one way to make a roux. I can't imagine the folks who make a roux daily for their dinners bother to clarify butter. Most probably use oil.

Also, liquid isn't always the first thing added to a roux. Some recipes call for adding the trinity to the roux to stop the darkening and start the cooking process.
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Old 01-07-2013, 11:43 AM   #13
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You have to measure to make roux? Oh...

One other piece of advise, and one that isn't given often. Never, ever taste the roux from the pan while making it. A friend of mine gave me this advice after finding out it burns, and sticks, kinda like napalm. He wasn't amused when I laughed.
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Old 01-07-2013, 11:54 AM   #14
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I don't want to hijack this thread, but I have a question that I think may be useful to Patra as well as myself.

What do you all mean by "parts"? Is it a general term for the same exact amount, or is it a term for a conversion or something?

I tried to make a roux once before and it didn't really come out that great because the recipes/instructions I found via Google were all pretty much the same, and all just said "1:1 ratio" or "equal parts."

On this page, the recipe states
Quote:
Begin making the roux by melting 1 cup of clarified butter
and then the next step is
Quote:
Whisk 1-3/4 cups of flour into the clarified butter
That doesn't sound like equal parts to me. :p
What am I missing?
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:16 PM   #15
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Equal parts means what you said = measurements

It's just a ratio

1:1 = 1 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon and 1 cup to 1 cup and 4T to 4T, etc etc

2:1 = 2 cups to 1 cup and 4T to 2T. Etc etc
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:27 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
The 'classic' roux flour/clarified butter mixture should look like a sandy dry white lump when it's finished. Then it's cooled then into a medium hot pan then any hot liquid is added all at once to the flour/butter mixture and then whisked into the liquid. Anything that looks like a liquid wall paper paste before the liquid is added is not going to result in a classic roux. It will be something but not a 'roux'.
The OP asked about a roux for cajun cooking. A sandy dry white lump is not what a cajun roux should look like. It should look more like this: Tip: How To Make a Brown Roux | The Kitchn
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:37 PM   #17
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I learned how to make roux from Justin Wilson, equal parts flour and fat, make it as dark as you like for beef, lighter for chicken and seafood. I have never had a problem with any of my dishes based on roux.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:58 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Patra View Post
I'll be trying out some Cajun/creole dishes later this week, but I'm still deciding which recipes I'll be using. For the roux, I've seen an equal number of recipes call for butter and for oil. I'm wondering if I need to adjust the proportions of the fat and flour if I choose to substitute butter for oil or vise versa. Also appreciate any tips from anyone who has made it before :)
It all depends upon what you are making! What flavors you would like to impart and the thickness of the final dish. The color of the dish etc.. Just say you were making beef gravy, you would use the fat from beef dishes,if making pork gravy, you may flavor it with bacon fat. For a basic roux, I like to use peanut oil ( veg, canola, corn oil will work too ) 50/50. To adjust the thickness more flour will be needed for a thicker sauce or gravy. The norm is a light roux for darker meats like beef or venison and a darker roux for seafood and gumbos. To get fat from beef and such you must take if from the dripping. The way I do this is : say you cook a roast beef in a baking pan with stock or water added to the pan, the fat dripping will drip to the bottom pan. Refrigerate the dripping and the fat will solidify where it can be spooned off and saved until you have enough to make the amount of roux needed. Of course it may be frozen until enough is acquired. I know, it sounds like a hassle for the home cook but its the way most restaurants do it who make their own sauces.
If your making a gumbo the "trinity" can be added to the finished roux and cooked till heated and the flavors are enhanced, then seasoning, stock is add and this will finish the cooking of the vegies as you proceed with finishing the dish. The usual trinity consists of two parts chopped onion, one part chopped bell pepper and 1/2 part chopped celery. I hope this is of some help , Joey

PS: the rice is always made "on the side"
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Old 01-07-2013, 03:22 PM   #19
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Thanks for the advice everyone! I'll be sticking with seafood dishes so it sounds like I need a darker roux. Since I'll be making it multiple times and I won't have to deal with adjusting proportions, I'll try out both butter and oil. Thanks again!
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Old 01-07-2013, 03:28 PM   #20
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I like to make it in big batches and freeze it in an ice cube tray. They I have it for quick fix meals.
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