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Old 02-06-2015, 01:04 PM   #11
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Thanks Jenn, I figured it's how the elements cycle between the two modes. I've used both modes on identical recipes before with really no noticeable difference, as far as I can tell.
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:55 PM   #12
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To the OP. To be perfectly honest, "baked" ham is a misnomer. Ham is cured, then sometimes smoked, often roasted, these days usually precooked and then reheated by the consumer, but it's never actually baked in the purest definition of the word.
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:56 PM   #13
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I use the roast cycle on my stove by accident to bake my cake and the top got very very brown. Next day I used the bake cycle with the cakes and perfect. Still don't know how one says baking and roasting the same....according to this?
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:52 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by mumu View Post
My oven is the same ... Roast and bake settings. And not trying to lose any sleep over it, just trying to understand. I know some things you don't have to understand. Jennyema your information on roasting temperture and baking temperture confirms its baking on the ham,but why is it still say in recipe to roast in oven. You think they would say bake in oven and leave roast out of recipe. I always thought and when looked at recipes that mention roast,the recipe always seemed to produced a carmelized crunchy outside and no cover. So how is it they say roast and bake same thing in oven ,but for roasting .... No cover, outside crunchy. How does one determine what recipe is saying......? And as far as oven goes if roasting dial is for top element hotter, my ham would of been a mess if bake and roast are the same. Again how does one know when recipe says roast talking about ( roasting ,no cover ....crunchy outside) or if saying baking and roasting is the same. I hope said this right....how do you distinguish what they want. Please don't say you learn it, you have to have some idea. Again thanks

They should have said "HEAT" the ham!
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:53 PM   #15
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I use the roast cycle on my stove by accident to bake my cake and the top got very very brown. Next day I used the bake cycle with the cakes and perfect. Still don't know how one says baking and roasting the same....according to this?


I think I explained why this happened a few posts above.
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:10 PM   #16
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Yes u did explain the stove cycle. But I still am having a hard time with when recipes have roast,when they say roast and bake is the same and how to distinguish in recipe when roast or bake? What I said above in your post you copied me. Yes I agree ham should of said heat .... But said roast,so does many other recipes I looked at say roast, which to me roast is like I said previously. Any clues or help on how others know which is which. Really trying to get a understanding on it. Like stove if I would of used roast bec. That's what they said to do. Put in oven covered and roast x amount of time.( roast and bake same.... But roasting produce a carmelized crunchy crust.?) both same but different? About stove when did cake was giving you an example ...bec. Everyone says roast and bake are the same?...how can they? Any advice on how others understand this. Thanksq
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:48 PM   #17
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...how to distinguish in recipe when roast or bake?
The majority of us don't have ovens with different roast and bake settings, and recipes aren't usually written for the types of ovens that do. Furthermore, many recipe writers use terms interchangeably. When they say "roast" or "bake," what they are really saying is "preheat the oven to the designated temperature and put the food in it."

With a ham, all you are doing is reheating it. It's already been cured and cooked. Does your oven have a "reheat" setting? Probably not. But if it does, that's what I would use for ham.

But at the end of the day, for most of us it's exactly the same thing: preheat the oven to the designated temperature and put the food in it.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:20 PM   #18
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Thanks... I understand that about the temperture. What I am trying to figure out is why people say roast and bake are the same when clearly if u tell someone to roast vegatables you are expecting a crunchy outside. I asked a few of my freinds if I said had a choice between something roasted or baked what would you preference be and they said if want something without the cruch would go with something baked and of course for crunch roasted, bec... Roasted gives you this. So again not trying to be difficult but how is it that roasting and baking be the same? So if recipe says roast u think of no cover and a carmelized crunch on the outside. Why would you say roast and bake are the same? How do you determine which way to go. Again please don't think I am going on about nothing but I don't understand the above which I asked.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:29 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by mumu View Post
I use the roast cycle on my stove by accident to bake my cake and the top got very very brown. Next day I used the bake cycle with the cakes and perfect. Still don't know how one says baking and roasting the same....according to this?
Because most ovens don't have those options. Most just say "Bake" or "Broil" or "Clean". Mine is a convection oven so I have "Convection Bake" also. I cook a roast and bake bread on the same "Bake" cycle. I keep meaning to experiment with the convection setting, but somehow it never seems to work out that I have the time or the flexibility to fail.

Most of the time you want a meat roast to get browned on the top and sides, but you don't want that on a cake. That is the only real reason for the different cycles of "Bake" or "Roast". There are other ways to get a crust on a roast while using the "Bake" setting, so in reality, having a "Roast" setting is just a convenience, not a necessity.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:31 PM   #20
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Yes u did explain the stove cycle. But I still am having a hard time with when recipes have roast,when they say roast and bake is the same and how to distinguish in recipe when roast or bake?
I don't know where you're getting your recipes from, but I think you're giving the writers way too much credit. Many writers aren't as meticulous as they should be, especially on personal blogs. They may not know or don't care about the difference. All that matters is that you use the right temperature for the right amount of time.
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