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Old 02-06-2015, 11:12 AM   #1
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Question About Roasting Versus Baking.

I am baking a ham and I notice my recipe says to put in oven covered and roast it for x amount of time. My question is why does it say roast when I am clearly baking it. ( not roasting it). I am a liittle confused on why they say roast ....again thank you for any help ,not playing on words just trying to understand.

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Old 02-06-2015, 11:35 AM   #2
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Roast - bake - when talking meat it's all the same. It means cooking with dry heat in the oven. Some things you do covered, some not. Ham is usually covered, because it's already cooked and you are essentially just reheating it. Doing it uncovered would just dry it out.
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Old 02-06-2015, 11:35 AM   #3
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Play on words I guess. I use the word bake when making brownies and use the word roast when making a chicken in the oven. Even though both might cook at 350F for 30 minutes.

Don't lose any sleep over this as its the same thing.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:07 PM   #4
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Its irrelevant to the task of warming up a ham.



For what it's worth ...
What's the Difference Between Roasting and Baking?

While these cooking methods are nearly identical in today's kitchen, there's actually a few things that set them apart.
  • Structure of the food. This is the primary factor that sets these cooking methods apart. Roasting involves cooking foods that already have a solid structure before the cooking process begins (think, meat and vegetables). Baking involves that lack structure early on, then become solid and lose their "empty space" during the cooking (think, cakes and muffins).
  • Temperature. Various sources note that the temperature setting on the oven also distinguishes these two cooking method. Roasting requires a higher temperature (400 degrees F and above) to create a browned, flavorful "crust" on the outside of the food being cooked, while baking occurs at lower oven temperatures (up to 375 degrees F).
  • Fat content. While many baked goods contain fat within, an outer coating of fat, such as vegetables or meat brushed with olive oil, is an indicator of roasting.
  • Covered pan. Roasting is typically done in an open, uncovered pan, while items that are baked may be covered.
What's the Difference Between Roasting and Baking? — Word of Mouth | The Kitchn
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:24 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Roast - bake - when talking meat it's all the same. It means cooking with dry heat in the oven. Some things you do covered, some not. Ham is usually covered, because it's already cooked and you are essentially just reheating it. Doing it uncovered would just dry it out.
+1 on the covering to retain moisture. I'd add that using a nice low heat like 200F will heat the ham but not turn it into rubber bands do to the protein strands contracting due to any temp. over 212 F.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:26 PM   #6
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Play on words I guess. I use the word bake when making brownies and use the word roast when making a chicken in the oven. Even though both might cook at 350F for 30 minutes.

Don't lose any sleep over this as its the same thing.
agreed.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:28 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
+1 on the covering to retain moisture. I'd add that using a nice low heat like 200F will heat the ham but not turn it into rubber bands do to the protein strands contracting due to any temp. over 212 F.

Its already cooked so the issue is drying it out, not turning it into rubber bands
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:30 PM   #8
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Then why does my oven have separate bake and roast modes with identical temp preset choices for each? I've always wondered about that... and I've lost sleep over this.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:57 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Then why does my oven have separate bake and roast modes with identical temp preset choices for each? I've always wondered about that... and I've lost sleep over this.

Possibly a matter of how evenly the upper and lower heating elements heat up.

I had the same question about my friend's oven so I looked at the manual and it said that for BAKE both the upper and lower elements cycled together evenly, but for ROAST the upper element got hotter.

That would be consistent with the idea of baking a cake or bread (even heat) and roasting a chicken (hotter heat on top to brown).

Do you still have the owners manual?
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:00 PM   #10
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My oven is the same ... Roast and bake settings. And not trying to lose any sleep over it, just trying to understand. I know some things you don't have to understand. Jennyema your information on roasting temperture and baking temperture confirms its baking on the ham,but why is it still say in recipe to roast in oven. You think they would say bake in oven and leave roast out of recipe. I always thought and when looked at recipes that mention roast,the recipe always seemed to produced a carmelized crunchy outside and no cover. So how is it they say roast and bake same thing in oven ,but for roasting .... No cover, outside crunchy. How does one determine what recipe is saying......? And as far as oven goes if roasting dial is for top element hotter, my ham would of been a mess if bake and roast are the same. Again how does one know when recipe says roast talking about ( roasting ,no cover ....crunchy outside) or if saying baking and roasting is the same. I hope said this right....how do you distinguish what they want. Please don't say you learn it, you have to have some idea. Again thanks
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