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Old 05-26-2010, 02:32 AM   #11
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Its really pretty recipe. I want to share my favorite deli-style rye bread's recipe.
deli-style rye bread
makes 4 1 lb loaves. you’ll think you’ve died and gone to a jewish deli in nyc. from Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day.

3 cups lukewarm water
1 1/2 Tbsp yeast
1 1/2 Tbsp salt
1 1/2 Tbsp caraway seeds, plus more for sprinkling
1 cup rye flour
5 1/2 cups all purpose flour
cornmeal for sprinkling
cornstarch for cornstarch wash

1. mix the yeast, salt and carawy seeds with the water in a large bowl. mix in the remaning dry ingredients without kneading. cover with a towel and allow to rest at room temperature for about 2 hours. at this point, you can prepare the dough for baking or store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

2. dust the surface of the dough with flour and cut off 1/4 of the dough. dust the piece with more flour and quickly shape it into a ball. elongate the ball into an oval-shaped loaf. allow it to rest and rise on a cornmeal covered surface (pizza peel if you’re going to transfer to a baking stone or a baking sheet if you’re baking right on the baking sheet) for 40 minutes.

3. preheat the oven to 450 F with an empty broiler tray on the shelf underneath the one you plan to bake on. heat the baking stone up with the oven if you are using one.

4. make the cornstarch wash by combining 1/2 tsp cornstartch with a small amount of water to form a paste. add 1/2 cup water, whisk and microwave for about 60 seconds. paint the top of the loaf with the cornstarch wash and then sprinkle on caraway seeds. slash with a deep parallel cuts across the loaf using a serrated bread knife.

5. bake the loaf on a baking sheet or slide it onto the hot baking stone. bake for 30 minutes. as you put the bread in the oven to bake, pour 1 cup of hot tap water into the broiler tray and quickly close the oven door. allow to cool before slicing or eating.
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:17 PM   #12
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LOL, at the risk of being really obvious, why agonize over which rye to use, how to trim and cook it. Don't be a slave to the recipe, use a hamburger bun and voila!
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:37 PM   #13
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LOL, at the risk of being really obvious, why agonize over which rye to use, how to trim and cook it. Don't be a slave to the recipe, use a hamburger bun and voila!
Because what was described was a Patty Melt Grilled Sandwich - NOT a hamburger, which is entirely different.

Not "being a slave to a recipe" is like wanting to bake a real nice pie, but someone else telling you to forget it, and just bake cookies instead because it's easier.
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:52 PM   #14
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Why not just toast the bread in a regular toaster? Then just simply assemble the sandwich.
The difference between "dill" rye bread and the others is the addition of dill. Some rye bread has caraway, which has a distinctive flavor, some don't have it. Go with what you like.
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:05 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Because what was described was a Patty Melt Grilled Sandwich - NOT a hamburger, which is entirely different.

Not "being a slave to a recipe" is like wanting to bake a real nice pie, but someone else telling you to forget it, and just bake cookies instead because it's easier.
Hey Selkie, thanks so much for your helpful advice and comments. As 'rush' didn't appear to know the difference between a patty melt and what he/she called a "hamburger recipe", I made an attempt, apparently from your POV, a feeble one...to inject a little levity into the thread.
I was also attempting to point out that one doesn't have to follow a recipe religiously, and that it is possible to make alterations to suit ones own tastes without receiving the death penalty for being a 'deviant'.
Baking on the other hand, which didn't involve this question, does in most cases need to be followed as written.
Personally, I've never set out to bake a pie and wind up with cookies instead, so it that happened to you, we'd all love to hear about it.
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:07 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by rush View Post
So what exactly is a "good Jewish" rye bread? Would Oroweat qualify?

Also, what's the difference between a Jewish rye bread and Dill rye bread?

Thanks!
I don't know what "ORowheat" is, but I'm guessing that bread comes from the grocery store prepackaged in plastic. We often do burgers on rye, and if I don't bake it, I go to a bakery and get a fresh loaf of Jewish rye. It's a style of rye bread that has caraway, and is a bit sour. We also like Russian rye, which is dark like pumpernickel.
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:59 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by MSC View Post
Hey Selkie, thanks so much for your helpful advice and comments.
Quote:
As 'rush' didn't appear to know the difference between a patty melt and what he/she called a "hamburger recipe",
I made an attempt, apparently from your POV, a feeble one...to inject a little levity into the thread.
I was also attempting to point out that one doesn't have to follow a recipe religiously, and that it is possible to make alterations to suit ones own tastes without receiving the death penalty for being a 'deviant'.
Baking on the other hand, which didn't involve this question, does in most cases need to be followed as written.
Personally, I've never set out to bake a pie and wind up with cookies instead, so it that happened to you, we'd all love to hear about it.
I don't think that the OP didn't know the difference, I just think he/she didn't know the name of the sandwich... As for calling it a "hamburger recipe" I believe they meant a recipe using hamburger ( which is what some call it rather than ground beef)... That is the way I read this thread...
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:37 PM   #18
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somehow i don't think the "broad" would like that one little bit. just kidding with you, we all make typos. just made me laugh though. i know, i know weird sense of humor.
Very funny.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:49 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Mimizkitchen View Post
I don't think that the OP didn't know the difference, I just think he/she didn't know the name of the sandwich... As for calling it a "hamburger recipe" I believe they meant a recipe using hamburger ( which is what some call it rather than ground beef)... That is the way I read this thread...
I'm a burger-and-fries guy. I understand that the hamburger is essentially a type of sandwich, but I would definitely not categorize the "Patty Melt" as a sandwich, but a burger, because of the patty used.

You guys all bring excellent points, and I'm extremely thankful for it. Honestly, I'm OCD when it comes to recipes. A little of it has to do with the fact that I'm very new to cooking, so I don't know how to intelligently improvise, but I really want to taste the authentic product, as it was meant to taste.

The choice of bun, is very important to me. If you don't eat a Chicago Dog on a poppy seed bun, it really isn't the same. The whole point of using rye bread, according to the recipe, was to emphasize the flavors of the meat, cheese and grilled onions.

Again, thanks a lot, and I'll report back if I have any more questions. So far, I haven't really been able to cook, due to a recent knee injury, so I've put this recipe on hold.

As for asking about the differences in rye bread, I wanted to know the differences in taste, as opposed to simply, "Dill rye has dill." But... what does that taste like? Then again, it's really hard to describe the taste of all these different types of bread, so I don't know what I was asking, but I guess I was expecting someone to respond with something like, "Dill rye tastes a lot like a multi-grain bread. Jewish rye tastes like sourdough bread. Russian rye has a very pungent odor, but it works really well if you toast it and use it for the Patty Melt," etc etc.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:53 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
I don't know what "ORowheat" is, but I'm guessing that bread comes from the grocery store prepackaged in plastic. We often do burgers on rye, and if I don't bake it, I go to a bakery and get a fresh loaf of Jewish rye. It's a style of rye bread that has caraway, and is a bit sour. We also like Russian rye, which is dark like pumpernickel.
I don't know where you live, but Oroweat is the most popular brand of non-white bread in Southern California. Every market has an entire shelf (or three) dedicated to all the different multi-grain, whole grain, 8-seed, 12-seed, etc types of non-white bread from Oroweat.

Oroweat - Welcome
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