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Old 07-05-2005, 01:33 PM   #1
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question about spices

i got a spice rack from dean & deluca and it has some spices that i haven't used before on it.
what do i use these ones for?:
cumin
French tarragon
Greeek oregano
fines herbes
herbes de provence
ground coriander
allspice
lavender
tellicherry peppercorns
i know what the other ones are good with, but i need some pointers for these ones. thanks!
-luvs

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Old 07-05-2005, 01:57 PM   #2
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cumin-popular in chili, BBQ rubs and middle Eastern foods

French tarragon-a key ingredient in Bearnaise Sauce and a great flavoring for fish

Greek oregano-this is the oregano we are most used to and is different from mexican oregano. Use it in Italian and greek cooking.

fines herbes-an herb blend useful in braises and stews

herbes de provence-same answer as fines herbes

ground coriander-used in some baked goods and in currys

allspice-used alot in baking - pies and cakes. Also in some middle eastern foods

lavender-used in tea and is one of the components of herbes de provence

tellicherry peppercorns-put them in a peppermill and grind away. They are a very flavorful black pepper.
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Old 07-05-2005, 02:02 PM   #3
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cumin - - in a word, ewww. It's in a lot of mexican recipes, but I think it smells rather like a dirty sock.

French tarragon - great with poultry, imo, and I hear it's also fantastic with salmon & orange roughy

herbes de provence - great combo - once you try it, you'll want to use it on poultry, veggies and everything in between.

ground coriander - yum!!! Scandinavian cookies have this in them - it has a really distinct taste and it is really good. Add it to your oil/vinegar dressing for a neat kick.

allspice - Not actually all spices. Allspice is really good for mulling cider, adding to pumpkin cookies and persimmon bread. Also, my sis is allergic to cinnamon, but can have this close substitution.

lavender - Try making your lemonade's simple syrup and adding this stuff to it. Then, before you add it to ice water, strain to get the lavendar out. The flavor will really put some summer in your drink! It's also in a lavendar mojito, which I'm still looking for the recipe for..... Also, lavendar is great in scones with clotted cream.
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Old 07-05-2005, 02:50 PM   #4
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European Herbs

leaves + parsley OR fines herbes (This is a blend of herbs ... French call fines herbes. Use it sparingly--a little ... from recipe OR herbes de Provence (This blend contains thyme.) OR
http://www.foodsubs.com/HerbsEur.html


European Herbs
herbes de Provence Pronunciation: AIRB duh proh- VAHNS Notes: Dried is an acceptable substitute for fresh. To make your own: Combine four parts thyme plus four parts summer savory, two parts lavender, and one part rosemary.
Beau Monde seasoning Notes: This is a seasoning mix manufactured by Spices Islands that combines salt, onion, and celery flavors. Substitutes: equal parts onion powder and celery salt OR Bon Appetit seasoning (similar, but also hard to find) OR onion salt OR celery salt OR Penzey's English Prime Rib Rub

bouquet garni Pronunciation: boo-KAY gahr-NEE To make your own: Tie together with a string or wrap securely in cheesecloth: 4 sprigs fresh parsley or chervil, 1 sprig fresh thyme, and 1 bay leaf. Variations if you're using cheesecloth: Add one or more of the following: orange peel, cloves, peppercorns, marjoram, fennel leaves, celery leaves Substitutes: equal parts parsley, thyme, and crushed bay leaf OR equal parts chervil, thyme, and crushed bay leaf OR equal parts basil, marjoram, and summer savory

British mixed spice

epices Parisiennes


fines herbes Pronunciation: feen-ZAIRB Substitutes: equal parts chervil, tarragon, chives, and parsley OR equal parts chervil and chives (For more variations, visit the Illinois Cooperative Extension Service's Fines Herbes--Homemade page.)

Greek seasoning Shopping hints: Cavender's is a popular brand. To make your own: See the recipe for Greek Seasoning posted on RecipeSource.com. Substitutes: equal parts rosemary and paprika

lavender Notes: Cooks use this fragrant flower to flavor jellies, baked goods and grilled meat. Substitutes: drops of Parfait Amour (a lavender-flavored liqueur)

fines herbes Pronunciation: feen-ZAIRB Substitutes: equal parts chervil, tarragon, chives, and parsley OR equal parts chervil and chives (For more variations, visit the Illinois Cooperative Extension Service's Fines Herbes--Homemade...


http://www.foodsubs.com/SpicemixEur.html

allspice = toute-epice = Jamaica pepper = myrtle pepper = pimiento = pimento = clove pepper = newspice Notes: Allspice comes from a single tree, but it tastes like a mixture of cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg. You can buy it already ground, but for better flavor and a longer shelf life, buy the berries and grind them yourself. Equivalents: 5 whole berries yield 1 teaspoon ground Substitutes: equal parts cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg, all ground OR equal parts cinnamon and cloves, all ground OR equal parts cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and black pepper, all ground

Greek seasoning Shopping hints: Cavender's is a popular brand. To make your own: See the recipe for Greek Seasoning posted on RecipeSource.com. Substitutes: equal parts rosemary and paprika herbes de Provence...
http://www.foodsubs.com/SpicemixEur.html

cilantro = coriander leaf = Chinese parsley = culantrillo = koyendoro = Mexican parsley = pak chee = yuen-sai = green coriander = coriander green Pronunciation: sih-LAN-troh Notes: Cilantro leaves are used throughout the world as a fragrant herb. Hispanic cooks use it in salsas, Asians in stir-fries, and Indians in curries. The seeds (called coriander seeds), stems, and roots of the plant are also used. Cilantro doesn't cook very well, so always add it to hot dishes at the last minute. Don't confuse cilantro with Italian parsley, which looks just like it but isn't nearly as fragrant. Substitutes: Italian parsley (If you like, add some mint or lemon juice or a dash of ground coriander.) OR equal parts parsley and mint OR parsley + dash lemon juice OR papalo (similar flavor, but more pungent) OR parsley + dash ground coriander OR celery leaves OR dill (especially in Thai seafood dishes) OR basil


coriander leaf

Global Spices




allspice = toute-epice = Jamaica pepper = myrtle pepper = pimiento = pimento = clove pepper = newspice Notes: Allspice comes from a single tree, but it tastes like a mixture of cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg. You can buy it already ground, but for better flavor and a longer shelf life, buy the berries and grind them yourself. Equivalents: 5 whole berries yield 1 teaspoon ground Substitutes: equal parts cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg, all ground OR equal parts cinnamon and cloves, all ground OR equal parts cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and black pepper, all ground

anise See anise seed or star anise.


anise seed = aniseed = anis Pronunciation: ANN-us Notes: Cooks use anise seed to impart a licorice flavor to baked goods, liqueurs, and candies. Substitutes: fennel seed (This has a milder flavor and is sweeter than anise.) OR star anise (stronger flavor; 1 crushed star anise = 1/2 teaspoon crushed anise seed) OR caraway seed OR tarragon

benne seed See sesame seed.

black pepper = black peppercorns See pepper.

canela See cinnamon.


cardamom = cardamon = green cardamom Notes: Cardamom figures prominently into the cuisines of India, the Middle East, North Africa, and Scandinavia. It best to buy cardamom seeds still encased in their natural flavor-protecting pods, which you discard after you remove the seeds. You can also buy cardamom without the pods, called cardamom seeds = decorticated cardamom, but the unprotected seeds lose flavor quickly. Ground cardamom seeds are even less flavorful. Recipes that call for cardamom usually intend for you to use green cardamom, named for the green pods that encase the seeds. Some producers bleach the green hulls to a pale tan, but this makes them less aromatic. Brown cardamom is a similar spice that Indians use in savory dishes. Equivalents: One pod yields 1/6 teaspoon cardamom. Substitutes: brown cardamom OR equal parts ground nutmeg and cinnamon OR equal parts ground cloves and cinnamon OR nutmeg OR cinnamon

cardamon See cardamom.






cassia cinnamon = cassia = Chinese cinnamon = Chinese cassia = false cinnamon Notes: Most of the cinnamon that's sold in America is cassia, which is cheaper and more bitter than the choice Ceylon cinnamon. Substitutes: cinnamon OR nutmeg OR allspice



cinnamon Equivalents: One cinnamon stick yields 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon. Notes: With its warm, sweet flavor, cinnamon is one of the biggest workhorses on the spice shelf. Cooks often use it to flavor baked goods and drinks, but cinnamon also works wonders in stews and sauces. The best cinnamon is Ceylon cinnamon = canela = Sri Lanka cinnamon = true cinnamon. Indonesian cinnamon has a similar taste, but larger quills. Much of the cinnamon sold in the United States is cassia cinnamon, which isn't as well regarded. Substitutes: nutmeg OR allspice

clove pepper See allspice.


clove Notes: Cloves are nail-shaped dried flower buds that have a sweet, penetrating flavor. They can be ground and used to flavor baked goods or sauces, or left whole and poked into roasted hams or pork. Use cloves sparingly--a little goes a long way. Substitutes: allspice (as a substitute for ground cloves)

comino See cumin.


coriander seeds Pronunciation: CORE-ee-an-dehr Notes: Coriander seeds are a common ingredient in the cuisines of India, the Middle East, Latin America, North Africa, and Southeast Asia. The popular herb cilantro comes from the same plant, but it's not a good substitute for the seeds. You can buy the seeds already ground, but for better flavor and shelf life, buy coriander seeds and grind them yourself. To enhance the flavor, toast the seeds in a pan for a few minutes first. Substitutes: caraway seeds OR cumin



cumin = comino = cummin = jeera Pronunciation: KUH-min or KYOO-min or KOO-min Equivalents: 1 oz. = 4 tablespoons ground = 4 1/2 tablespoons whole seed. Notes: Cumin is a key ingredient in Southwestern chili recipes, but it's also widely used in Latin America, North Africa, and India. Freshly roasted and ground cumin seeds are far superior to packaged ground cumin. Substitutes: caraway seeds (use half as much) OR black cumin seeds (smaller and sweeter) OR caraway seeds + anise seeds OR chili powder

cummin See cumin.
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Old 07-05-2005, 02:51 PM   #5
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Global Spices

dill seed = dillseed Notes: Dill seed tastes like dill leaves, but it's much stronger. It's a common ingredient in pickles, dips, and potato salad. Substitutes: dill leaves OR caraway seed OR celery seed


fennel seed = fennel = sweet cumin Pronunciation: FEN-uhl Notes: This is similar to anise seed, but sweeter and milder. It pairs well with fish, but Italians also like to add it to sauces, meat balls, and sausages. Both the seeds and the stalks from the plant are sometimes called fennel. If a recipe calls for a large amount, it probably intends for you to use the stalks. Substitutes: anise seed OR cumin OR caraway seeds OR dill


green cardamom See cardamom.

green pepper= green peppercorns See pepper.

Jamaica pepper See allspice.

jeera See cumin.

lovage seed Substitutes: celery seed


mace Notes: This is the lacy wrapping that covers nutmeg when it's plucked from the tree. Its flavor is similar to nutmeg, but slightly more bitter. It's usually sold already ground, but you can sometimes find blades of mace that you can grind yourself. Substitutes: nutmeg (sweeter and milder than mace) OR allspice OR pumpkin pie spice OR cinnamon OR ginger



mustard seeds Notes: Mustard seeds have a hot, pungent flavor. Yellow mustard seeds are the ones you'll most likely find in American and European kitchens. They're often ground and made into prepared mustard or added to stews and sauces to give them some zip. Indian cooks usually prefer the smaller and more pungent brown mustard seeds or black mustard seeds. When recipes call simply for mustard, they may be referring to prepared mustard, the condiment we like to put on hot dogs. When crushed, mustard seeds are very pungent, but Indian cooks fry them in oil, which makes them sweet and mild. Substitutes: wasabi powder OR horseradish

myrtle pepper See allspice.

newspice See allspice.

pepper See separate web page for pepper.

pimento See allspice.

pimiento See allspice.

pink peppercorns See pepper.


poppy seeds Pronunciation: POP-ee Equivalents: One cup ground poppy seeds = 2 ounces. Notes: These tiny, nutty seeds are typically used in baked goods, but some cuisines also use them in savory dishes. Europeans prefer black poppy seeds, while Indians prefer white, but the two kinds can be substituted for one another. Since poppy seeds are high in fat, they tend to go rancid quickly, so buy small amounts and store them in the refrigerator. Consuming poppy seeds can result in a false positive on a drug test. Substitutes: sesame seeds



saffron Equivalents: 1 teaspoon threads = 1/8 teaspoon powder Notes: To make a pound of saffron, over two hundred thousand stigmas from crocus sativus flowers must be harvested by hand. That's why saffron is the world's most expensive spice, and also why so there are so many fakes on the market. Fortunately, a little of the good stuff goes a long way--it only takes a few threads to add saffron's distinct yellow color and earthy aroma to a family meal of paella or bouillabaisse. You can buy saffron either as as unprocessed stigmas (called saffron threads) or powdered. The threads should be red with orange tips. Threads lacking orange tips may be dyed, so avoid them. The quality of powdered saffron is measured by its Minimum Coloring Strength. The higher the Minimum Coloring Strength, the less saffron you need to use. A typical level is 180, and a level of 220 or higher is quite good. Some cooks prefer the threads to the powder, since it's hard to detect if the powder has been adulterated. Powdered saffron, though, is easier to use, since it can be added directly to a dish, while the threads need to be steeped in hot water first. Substitutes: turmeric (for color, not flavor; use 4 times as much) OR safflower (use 8 times as much; less expensive and imparts similar color, but taste is decidedly inferior) OR marigold blossoms (for color, not flavor; use twice as much) OR annatto seeds (Steep 1 teaspoon annatto seeds in 1/4 cup of boiling water for 30 minutes, discard seeds. Reduce liquid in recipe by 1/4 cup.) OR red and yellow food coloring



sesame seed = benne seed = goma Notes: These nutritious seeds have a mild, nutty flavor. They're commonly used in baked goods, Asian stir-fries, and Middle-Eastern candies. European recipes for sesame seeds are usually referring to white sesame seeds, but Indian and Asian recipes sometimes intend for you to use the more pungent black sesame seeds. Substitutes: pumpkin seeds

sweet cumin See fennel seed.

toute-epice See allspice.


ground turmeric = powdered turmeric = Indian saffron = eastern saffron. Pronunciation: TURR-mer-ick Notes: Turmeric has a pleasant enough flavor, but it's prized more for the brilliant yellow color it imparts to whatever it's cooked with. It's a standard ingredient in curry powders, pickles, and prepared mustards. Be careful--turmeric can stain your clothes. Substitutes: turmeric (1 piece fresh turmeric = 1 teaspoon ground turmeric) OR mustard powder OR mustard powder + pinch of saffron



vanilla bean = vanilla pod Notes: Vanilla is used to flavor everything from baked goods to ice cream. Most recipes call for vanilla extract, but some argue that vanilla beans lend a more potent flavor. Select beans that are shiny, moist, and pliable--dried out beans aren't nearly as potent. If a recipe calls for just for the seeds, split the bean open and scrape the seeds out, and save the outer pod to flavor sugar or hot drinks. Substitutes: vanilla extract (One inch of vanilla bean = 1 teaspoon extract)




white pepper = white peppercorns See pepper.


yellow mustard seeds = white mustard seeds Notes: Whole mustard seeds are most commonly used to make pickles or relish. Most cooks prefer their mustard either ground, called ground mustard = dry mustard = mustard powder, or ready-made as a condiment, called prepared mustard. Substitutes: powdered mustard OR brown mustard seeds OR black mustard seeds




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Old 07-05-2005, 02:52 PM   #6
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European Herbs

angelica = archangel = ground ash = masterwort Pronunciation: an-JEL-ih-ca Notes: Angelica is prized for its crunchy stems, which are often candied and used to decorate baked goods. You can also use the leaves and stems to add a celery flavor to liqueurs, sauces, and vegetable side dishes. Substitutes: lovage (This also tastes like celery, and the stems can be candied like angelica.) OR tarragon


archangel

bai holapha

bai manglak

balm


basil Pronunciation: BAY-zuhl or BAHZ-uhl Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried. Notes: Basil is widely used in Mediterranean countries, where it flavors everything from pasta sauces to pesto, and in Southeast Asia, where it's often stir-fried with other ingredients. There are numerous varieties, ranging from the more pungent Asian basils to the sweeter and milder European varieties. Use dried basil only in a pinch--it's not nearly as flavorful as fresh. Substitutes: oregano OR thyme OR tarragon OR summer savory OR equal parts parsley and celery leaves OR cilantro (This works well in pesto.) OR mint (especially in Thai cuisine)



bay leaf = bay laurel leaf = laurel leaf = sweet bay laurel leaf Equivalents: One whole leaf = 1/4 teaspoon crushed. Substitute one fresh leaf for every two dried leaves, and one California bay leaf for every two Turkish bay leaves. Notes: Bay leaves are a staple of Mediterranean cuisines, lending a woodsy flavor to sauces, stews, and grilled meats. It's best to add whole leaves, then remove them before serving the dish. The Turkish bay leaf is smaller and less potent than the California bay leaf, but more highly prized due to the complexity of its flavor. Dried leaves are a good substitute for fresh. Substitutes: Indian bay leaves OR boldo leaves (stronger flavor) OR juniper berries (to flavor meat)

bergamot Substitutes: mint




borage Pronunciation: BORE-idge or BURR-idge or BAHR-idge Notes: Borage is best known for its attractive blue flowers, but Europeans sometimes use the leaves as an herb in salads and soups. Borage has a mild flavor that's been likened to that of cucumbers. The leaves are covered with prickly, throat-catching hairs, so it's best to either blanch them or chop them finely before serving them. Substitutes: spinach OR escarole OR burnet



chervil = French parsley Pronunciation: CHUR-vil Notes: This feathery green herb tastes like a subtle blend of parsley and anise. It's far more plentiful in Europe than in America. Avoid the dried version--it has very little flavor. Substitutes: cicely OR parsley + tarragon OR fennel leaves + parsley OR fines herbes (This is a blend of herbs that usually includes chervil, parsley, chives, and tarragon.) OR parsley + dill OR tarragon (Like chervil, this is good for flavoring vinegars.) OR chives (especially with eggs) OR dill weed (good for flavoring vinegars)



chives Notes: These slender, hollow shoots have a mild onion flavor. Many cooks use scissors to cut fresh chives, sprinkling them like confetti on potatoes, eggs, and salads. Always use fresh chives--they lose much of their flavor when they're frozen or freeze-dried. Substitutes: green onion tops (These have a stronger flavor and wider shoots. If using them as a substitute for minced chives, slice them lengthwise several times before mincing.) OR Chinese chives (more flavorful)


cicely = sweet cicely = Spanish chervil = sweet chervil Notes: This fern-like herb has a strong anise flavor. It's not well known in the United States, but it's popular in Scandinavia, where it's often used to flavor desserts. Substitutes: fennel leaves OR chervil (milder anise flavor)

citronella


curly parsley = curly-leaf parsley Notes: This has less flavor than Italian parsley, but it makes a terrific garnish. Don't bother buying dried parsley--it has very little flavor. Substitutes: Italian parsley OR chervil OR celery tops OR cilantro


curly parsley


dill leaf = dillweed = dill weed Notes: You can find soft, feathery sprigs of dill leaves in markets throughout the year. Chopped dill is often paired with fish, cucumbers, potatoes, or it's added to dips, salad dressings, or cream sauces. Dill loses flavor when it's heated, so always add it to cooked dishes at the last minute. Avoid dried dill; it has very little flavor. And don't confuse dill leaves with dill seeds--though they come from the same plant, they're not good substitutes for one another. Substitutes: tarragon (especially in sauces that accompany fish or eggs) OR fennel leaves (as a garnish; looks very similar)


fever grass

French parsley

ground ash


hyssop Pronunciation: HISS-up Notes: The leaves and small blue flowers of this plant are used as a garnish or to impart a mild, slightly bitter flavor to salads, soups, and liqueurs. Don't waste your time drying the leaves--they'll lose almost all of their flavor. Substitutes: sage


Italian basil


Italian parsley Notes: This is the best parsley to use for cooking--it has more flavor than the more common curly parsley. Avoid dried parsley; it has very little flavor. Substitutes: curly parsley OR chervil OR celery tops OR cilantro


kemangi

laurel leaf


lemon balm = balm = melissa = bee balm Notes: Cooks use this herb in teas, salads, jams, and soups. The fresh leaves also make an attractive garnish. Substitutes: bergamot (herb) OR lemon zest



lemon thyme Notes: This variety of thyme has a lemony flavor. Substitutes: thyme + dash lemon zest


lemon verbena = verbena Pronunciation: ver-BEE-nuh Notes: This has a strong lemon flavor that works especially well in teas and vegetable dishes. If you can't find it in the spice section, cut open lemon verbena teabags. Substitutes: lemongrass OR lemon zest

lovage = wild celery = smallage = smellage Pronunciation: LOVE-age Notes: Lovage tastes like celery, but it's even more pungent and flavorful. The only drawback but it can't withstand long cooking like celery can. Use it in any recipe that calls for celery, but use less and add it to cooked dishes at the last minute. Substitutes: equal parts parsley and celery leaves OR Chinese celery OR celery leaves (milder) OR parsley OR chervil

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Old 07-05-2005, 02:53 PM   #7
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European Herbs

marjoram = sweet marjoram = knot marjoram = knotted marjoram Pronunciation: MAR-jer-um Notes: Marjoram is sweeter and milder than its close relative, oregano. It's often used to season meats and fish, and works best when its added near the end of the cooking period. Fresh is best, but frozen or dried marjoram are acceptable substitutes. Don't confuse this with wild marjoram, which is better known as oregano. Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried. Substitutes: oregano (This is very similar, but not as sweet and mild as marjoram. Substitute two parts of oregano for three parts of marjoram.) OR thyme OR sage OR basil OR summer savory


masterwort

melissa


opal basil Notes: Opal basil has purple leaves and a longer shelf life than sweet basil, but the two can be used interchangeably in most recipes. Substitutes: sweet basil

oregano = wild marjoram = pot marjoram Pronunciation: uh-REG-uh-no Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried Notes: Oregano is a popular herb in Mediterranean countries, where it's often used to season tomato sauces, meat dishes, and pizzas. Mexican oregano has a mintier taste than ordinary oregano. If you can't find it fresh, dried oregano is a good substitute. Substitutes: marjoram (This is very similar, but milder and sweeter. Substitute two parts of oregano for three parts of marjoram.) OR thyme OR basil OR summer savory



parsley Notes: Parsley is prized both for its looks and for its fresh, grassy flavor. There are two common varieties: the mild curly parsley and the more flavorful Italian parsley. Use curly parsley if you want looks and Italian parsley if you want flavor. Parsley doesn't hold up well to cooking, so add it to cooked dishes at the very last minute. Frozen parsley is a good substitute for fresh, but dried parsley adds only color. Substitutes: chervil OR celery tops OR cilantro



rosemary Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried Notes: The Italians are particularly fond of this pungent herb with its needle-like leaves. They often use it to flavor meats and tomato sauces. Rosemary stems, stripped of their leaves, can also be used as skewers for kabobs. Dried rosemary is an excellent substitute for fresh. Substitutes: sage OR savory OR thyme



sage Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried. Notes: Sage is often combined with other strong herbs to flavor meat dishes and poultry stuffings. Use it sparingly; a little goes a long way. Dried sage is an excellent substitute for fresh. Substitutes: poultry seasoning OR rosemary OR thyme



savory Notes: This herb has a strong, peppery flavor, and it's often used in Mediterranean countries to flavor beans, mushrooms, vegetables, and meats. There are two varieties: winter savory and the milder summer savory. Winter savory is best suited to slowly cooked dishes like stews. Substitutes: thyme (stronger flavor) OR thyme + dash of sage or mint


smallage

smellage

Spanish chervil

spearmint
summer savory Notes: Summer savory is milder than winter savory. Substitutes: thyme (stronger flavor) OR thyme + dash of sage or mint

sweet basil = Italian basil Pronunciation: BAY-zuhl or BAHZ-uhl Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried. Notes: This is widely used throughout the Mediterranean region to make tomato sauces, pesto, and other dishes. Substitutes: sweet Asian basil (Use twice as many leaves. Sweet Asian basil is more flavorful, and doesn't wilt as easily when cooked.) OR pesto (Basil is an important ingredient in most pestos.) OR oregano OR thyme OR tarragon OR summer savory OR equal parts parsley and celery leaves OR cilantro (This works well in pesto.) OR mint (especially in Thai dishes)




sweet chervil

sweet cicely

sweet marjoram


tarragon Notes: The French are especially fond of this aromatic, anise-like herb. They often use it to flavor delicately flavored foods like eggs, fish, cheese, and chicken, and it's an indispensable ingredient in sauce béarnaise and in the herb mixture the French call fines herbes. Use it sparingly--a little goes a long way. Frozen tarragon is an excellent substitute for fresh, but use the dried version only in a pinch. Substitutes: dill OR basil OR marjoram OR fennel seed OR anise seed OR angelica



thyme Pronunciation: TIME Equivalents: 1 tablespoon fresh = 3/4 teaspoon dried Notes: This herb is widely used in Mediterranean countries to flavor stews and meat sauces. It's often used in combination with other herbs, like rosemary, parsley, and oregano. Use dried thyme only in a pinch--fresh thyme is far more flavorful. Substitutes: omit from recipe OR herbes de Provence (This blend contains thyme.) OR poultry seasoning (This blend contains thyme.) OR Italian seasoning (This blend contains thyme.) OR savory OR marjoram OR oregano


verbena

wild celery

wild marjoram


winter savory Notes: This perennial herb has a stronger flavor than its annual relative, summer savory. Substitutes: summer savory (milder) OR thyme (stronger flavor) OR thyme + dash of sage or mint





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Equivalents

1 tablespoon fresh = 1 teaspoon dried
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Old 07-05-2005, 07:07 PM   #8
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thanks you, guys!
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