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Old 01-29-2011, 11:04 AM   #11
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Question for the hamburger experts on this thread: is hamburger you grind from chuck "generally" going to be leaner than the kind you buy? I realize it depends on the % lean you get and things like that, but when I buy hamburger I'm always picturing the butcher tossing scraps salvaged from the carcass into the grinder, not nice big hunks like you would use for your own ground beef
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Old 01-29-2011, 11:08 AM   #12
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Sirloin is very lean. I would grind all of the fat with it. Or when you make the patties you could sandwich a pat of butter between two thin patties and cook. This makes for a juicy burger but of course there are more calories that way.
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Old 01-29-2011, 11:26 AM   #13
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When I grind I use chuck. Have been tempted to use other cuts, but not found a good price when I was looking at grinding. I tend to remove most of the fat (the big hard stuff, not the little marbling type). I don't know what the final % is but I usually end up with something that tastes close to the 93/7 I have bought. I like my burgers leaner and have no issues with them sticking together.

I use my KA with the food grinder. My only complaint is the size of grinding plates it comes with. I want one that is coarser for chili.

I did find some aftermarket plates on eBay at one point.
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Old 01-29-2011, 08:26 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
The grinder doesn't have a vise grip on the bottom to mount on a table? The hand crank ones I've seen all did. My mom always mounts hers on the pull out wooden cutting board. Works like a charm. I've wanted to start grinding my own hamburger for years, but always pictured a big electric meat grinder. Never even thought to just buy a hand crank one... ::wheels turning in skittle's head::
Actually, I take that back.

By chance, I glanced under the base of the grinder, and it had a small incision. I thought maybe I was supposed to prop it onto something, but I finally figured out that it's actually a suction.

My bad for sorta skimming through the scant instructions. I didn't think I missed anything, but I guess I did... although I wouldn't be surprised if this wasn't in the instructions.

After you place the grinder on the table, you need to turn the knob to "suction" it to the table. I thought the knob was just there to lock in the funnel that you assemble on top of the base, but it has a dual purpose. It not only locks in the funnel, but it also suctions the grinder to the table surface.

Yesterday's experience was far better. On second thought, this is an awesome meat grinder. I don't know how long the blade is gonna last, but so far, I'm blown away. Turning the crank is not a problem for me. Then again, I'm a fullgrown male, and I don't consider myself a weakling.

I would highly recommend this grinder, if you're contemplating it. Search "Norpro meat grinder" on Amazon. It's the white, $30 plastic model. I bought it on the recommendation of a famous meatball restaurant. I saw them use the product on Jimmy Falon's late night show to make meatballs, and I thought, "Wow, that's really cool, but it's probably out of my budget."

Then by chance, I received my issue of Men's Journal, where the owners of the said restaurant, rated meat grinders. This grinder received a 9 out of 10, and to my surprise, it was only $30. It beat out several grinders in the $100-$200 range. It lost to a $400 model (10 out of 10) though, which they claimed was actually better than the $1,000 model they installed at their restaurant. They also said they've used the $30 Norpro at home for years - to test meatball recipes - and it's still operating as good as new.
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Old 01-29-2011, 08:27 PM   #15
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If you add more fat to the burger it won't fall apart. Sirloin has more flavor, imho, than chuck so I would say grind some top sirloin and then a boston butt, pork butt, for the fat. Just an idea.
Wow, I didn't know that. Thanks so much!
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Old 01-29-2011, 08:31 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
Question for the hamburger experts on this thread: is hamburger you grind from chuck "generally" going to be leaner than the kind you buy? I realize it depends on the % lean you get and things like that, but when I buy hamburger I'm always picturing the butcher tossing scraps salvaged from the carcass into the grinder, not nice big hunks like you would use for your own ground beef
I heard this is a common practice with chuck. That's why I decided to invest in my own grinder.

If you're gonna buy pre-ground meat, they geneerally recommend you get sirloin, because the pre-ground chuck is gonna be the product of unappealing scraps...

People also recommend you choose the hunk of chuck yourself and tell the butcher to grind the meat for you. But I tried this method, and the butcher told me that if he did that for me, a good 1/3 of the meat will be stuck in his meat grinder... and I would have to pay for that 1/3, as well.
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Old 01-29-2011, 08:37 PM   #17
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I also noticed that ever since I started grinding my own meat, the patty is sticking pretty badly to my Staub 12" cast iron enamel grill pan...

I also own a smaller Le Creuset 10" cast iron enamel grill pan, which actually feels more like 9". Anyway, I find that the Le Creuset cast iron enamel aggressively develops a patina over time. So much so, that it flakes hardcore. It's also difficult to clean, because it never stops flaking.

But for my Staub, I do not see any patina forming... I like it, because it's bigger, but it feels more like it's just cast iron. Cooking chicken on it, is no problem, because I lube up the chicken, and in the process, the pan sorta gets seasoned.

Not with the beef patties however... I'm thinking of maybe seasoning the Staub, but I heard it's pointless, since it's already enameled... lately, I've been brushing the grill grates with some olive oil before heating it up, and that's helped a bit.
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Old 01-29-2011, 09:40 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by rush View Post
Actually, I take that back.

By chance, I glanced under the base of the grinder, and it had a small incision. I thought maybe I was supposed to prop it onto something, but I finally figured out that it's actually a suction.

My bad for sorta skimming through the scant instructions. I didn't think I missed anything, but I guess I did... although I wouldn't be surprised if this wasn't in the instructions.

After you place the grinder on the table, you need to turn the knob to "suction" it to the table. I thought the knob was just there to lock in the funnel that you assemble on top of the base, but it has a dual purpose. It not only locks in the funnel, but it also suctions the grinder to the table surface.

Yesterday's experience was far better. On second thought, this is an awesome meat grinder. I don't know how long the blade is gonna last, but so far, I'm blown away. Turning the crank is not a problem for me. Then again, I'm a fullgrown male, and I don't consider myself a weakling.

I would highly recommend this grinder, if you're contemplating it. Search "Norpro meat grinder" on Amazon. It's the white, $30 plastic model. I bought it on the recommendation of a famous meatball restaurant. I saw them use the product on Jimmy Falon's late night show to make meatballs, and I thought, "Wow, that's really cool, but it's probably out of my budget."

Then by chance, I received my issue of Men's Journal, where the owners of the said restaurant, rated meat grinders. This grinder received a 9 out of 10, and to my surprise, it was only $30. It beat out several grinders in the $100-$200 range. It lost to a $400 model (10 out of 10) though, which they claimed was actually better than the $1,000 model they installed at their restaurant. They also said they've used the $30 Norpro at home for years - to test meatball recipes - and it's still operating as good as new.
I agree that once you get it put together correctly it works like a charm and only takes up a little room in the kitchen. It was recommended to me by someone on another web site and I bought it from Amazon for $21.
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Old 01-30-2011, 02:36 PM   #19
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The best burgers are not made with the cheapest meats. If you really want great burgers mix equal parts brisket(for flavor), sirloin(for flavor) and chuck short ribs(for the marbled fat). Do not salt the meat until the patties are shaped(shape very loosely,not overworked), then "very liberally" salt and cook in a flat HOT cast iron skillet and cook until a nice crust has formed(3-4 minutes) then flip and do the same (also do not press the patties, unless you're doing a smash burger)
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Old 01-30-2011, 04:32 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by niquejim View Post
The best burgers are not made with the cheapest meats. If you really want great burgers mix equal parts brisket(for flavor), sirloin(for flavor) and chuck short ribs(for the marbled fat). Do not salt the meat until the patties are shaped(shape very loosely,not overworked), then "very liberally" salt and cook in a flat HOT cast iron skillet and cook until a nice crust has formed(3-4 minutes) then flip and do the same (also do not press the patties, unless you're doing a smash burger)
Are those cuts expensive where you are? Those are all cheap cuts here.(cept for sirloin, it all depends)

Your burger sounds great, but I like my brisket smoked. Depending on what you use on the brisket, the burger could be very lean.

Have you ever mixed in veal or lamb? I've wanted to, but they are rare around here and a bit on the pricey side.
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