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Old 03-02-2011, 06:18 AM   #11
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Egats, that website is just really cluttered and all over the place. Thanks, though.
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:20 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
Over here T Bone is about the same price as rib eye because of the inedible bone.
My take on steak is it must be hung for a min of 30 days, reared within 20 miles of the abattoir, if you cannot find or afford this don't buy cheap steak, buy a different cheaper cut like shin or skirt and cook it appropriately you cant make a silk purse out of a sows ear.
Fillet if properly aged is full flavoured but lacks texture due to the fact it is a non working muscle.
Before PC arrived in the UK Fillet was known as a womans steak
Why do you recommend skirt or shin? Are they softer? Yet cheaper? How does that work?
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:20 AM   #13
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The cut, and my preferred steak, is the Porterhouse.

In answer to your question, yes, a filet Mignon and filet eye are the same thing.

The Porterhouse is kind of a composite steak coming from the point where the tenderloin and top loin meet. Basically an over-sized T-Bone steak the porterhouse is thicker cut and has much more of the tenderloin relative to the loin portion. If you remove the bone and cut out the two steaks that basically make up this steak you will get a tenderloin steak and a top loin (or New York Strip Steak). So if you are ordering a Porterhouse, I hope you're hungry.
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:22 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Midnight_Merlot View Post
I happen to be a slave to a proper fillet of migon nowadays, but,...for dicucssion purposes, I simply die for the smaller side of a t-bone, &, lay "claim" to the bone as well...(those bits are 97% of the time undercooked...yums for me! )LOL
Sirloin, well, if you take proper care of it prior to cooking (meaning a good mirinade that consists of numerous different ways to get the cut to "break down" or ""soften" will help by leaps & bounds. Beer, brine, acidicity, carbonation, sugars, & salts just to name a few will help in breaking down a sirloins "beefy" texture.
As for a strip, well, I really don't ever buy nor cook them. I do know however, that, that particular cut has quite a following.
Myself, I am a ribeye gal all around. Sometimes even, I go w/a cheaper cut of chuck-eye. They both aim to please ME, &...I have thus far had around 95% satisfaction in my preferred cuts.
Steak is steak...just really kiinda boils down on how you cook it, &, what you have done to it before cooking has commenced. It's fun when you get it "right"!!, &,..I wish you gobs of luck! :)
I've never brined anything. What kinda brine would you recommend for steak?

And how much will brining improve a top sirloin steak? Will it become as soft as a prime rib?
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:26 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
The cut, and my preferred steak, between a rib-eye and a filet (yes, a filet Mignon and filiet eye are the same thing) is the Porterhouse. A Porterhouse is the best part of a rib-eye.
Who with the what?

I'm sorta confused.

I read that the porter house is basically a t-bone with a bigger piece of tenderloin (filet eye).

But you're saying that the porterhouse is a subsection of the ribeye?

I wish we had classes at school that taught this stuff... memorize the geography of a cow, instead of the U.S.
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:31 AM   #16
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The tenderloin, which is the large center section of the rib-eye is also the larger section of a porterhouse (same muscle). the tenderloin on a t-bone is the smaller side, so what you get is more tenderloin from a porterhouse, with some marbling on the other side of the bone. Besides, I like the flavor the roasted bone gives to the rest of the steak, unlike a rib-eye.
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Old 03-02-2011, 07:31 AM   #17
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Your bad experience with steak is because you are buying a very cheap grade of beef. If you want to enjoy steak, maybe save up and buy better quality meat. I honestly have never seen steak for sale fir $2 pound in probably 20 years.

A TBone and Porterhouse are basically the same thing. A filet mignon on one side and a NY strip on the other side. Tbones usually have a bigger filet. They are good steaks, but for your purposes probably not worth the extra money if its low quality meat.

You can't brine beef and get the same results as you get with poultry or shrimp.

One idea would buy some round steak of a higher quality, marinate it, grill it to medium rare, and slice it thinly against the grain: London Broil.
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Old 03-02-2011, 07:57 AM   #18
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Rush, with the quality, or lack thereof, of the cuts you are purchasing, your best bet is to treat them like chuck. Trying to compare the grades you are purchasing with prime grade or better is not worth discussing.

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Old 03-02-2011, 08:01 AM   #19
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I buy cheap steaks to always have some in the freezer. Not as cheap as you, Rush, but pretty darn cheap for my area. It's so cheap there isn't even a grade stamped on it. A couple years ago I think I payed 2.99/lb for strip and last year 3.99/lb for ribeye. I buy the whole loin and cut them myself (although the grocery store offers free cutting). The trick is to buy one with the most marbling. If none of them look good, I wait until they set some new ones out. I would rather buy a cheap ribeye than an expensive sirloin, but that's my taste. My preference is for rare and that's how I cook them. They are always tender and juicy. Sometimes I will treat myself to a better grade from behind the counter. There is an appreciable difference, but since I like to eat steak a lot the cheaper grade suits me fine, as long as there is some decent marbling. Without that marbling you might as well grind it up into lean hamburger.
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Old 03-02-2011, 08:04 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
... Tbones usually have a bigger filet.
I believe you have it backward... the porterhouse has the larger filet The definition describes that, and the difference in price from a t-bone reflects that.
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