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Old 01-04-2014, 01:27 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
When I think of American cuisine, fried chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, green beans and biscuits come to mind.

Sorry, I should have said southern American.......LOL
As I mentioned before, there's nothing more American than a Thanksgiving feast, and for the most part, it's the same all over the country.
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Old 01-04-2014, 01:38 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
When I think of American cuisine, fried chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, green beans and biscuits come to mind.

Sorry, I should have said southern American.......LOL
What I find interesting as that what you call biscuits, we call scones. And what we call biscuits you call cookies. We talk about chocolate chip biscuits.
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Old 01-04-2014, 02:00 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Lisa Mac View Post

What I find interesting as that what you call biscuits, we call scones. And what we call biscuits you call cookies. We talk about chocolate chip biscuits.
I always have to look that up when a UK or Canadian or Australian member mentions it because I can never remember what you call which Same with aubergines and courgettes
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Old 01-04-2014, 02:10 PM   #44
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Do Canadians and Brits still call a couch, a chesterfield? I know how off topic I am, but many years ago my new Canadian neighbor invited me over to see her new chesterfield. I thought she had a pack of smokes and they don't even make that brand anymore, so that tells you how long ago it was.
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Old 01-04-2014, 02:22 PM   #45
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In the Dark Ages when I was a kid--- in Missouri------sofas were often called Chesterfields. Go figure. Or davenports. Or couches. We were eclectic. My grandmother had one "something" filled with horse hair.

Only because I like words did I waste some time at The Word Detective

" named after the Earl of Chesterfield (a now obsolete title) in 19th century England, but the name is probably more evidence of clever marketing than any actual connection to nobility."

Now we know. And who cares??? LOL
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Old 01-04-2014, 02:35 PM   #46
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In the Dark Ages when I was a kid--- in Missouri------sofas were often called Chesterfields. Go figure. Or davenports. Or couches. We were eclectic. My grandmother had one "something" filled with horse hair.

Only because I like words did I waste some time at The Word Detective

" named after the Earl of Chesterfield (a now obsolete title) in 19th century England, but the name is probably more evidence of clever marketing than any actual connection to nobility."

OL
Now we know. And who cares??? L

I do! Oh I love to find out stuff like this. I wish my mom had lived to see the internet. Bless her heart, she used to take me to the library with stuff like this.
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Old 01-04-2014, 03:05 PM   #47
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Lisa, I've been thinking more about "Quintessential American Food".

The one day of the year that nearly every American eats basically the same meal is Thanksgiving Day. It's a very big deal here and without going into the interesting history of the day, it revolves around a feast of roasted turkey, mashed potatoes with turkey pan gravy, bread or cornbread dressing, cranberry sauce, various family side dishes, and pumpkin pie. It just doesn't get more American than that.
In Canada it's celebrated on another day, but the meaning and feast are basically the same.



But in the UK they have almost the identical dish every Christmas Day and have been doing for centuries. The only difference is that they substitute Christmas pudding and mince pies for the pumpkin pie. Oh, and they ALWAYS have brussel sprouts, which are ALWAYS put on to boil in July. ;)
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Old 01-04-2014, 03:31 PM   #48
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Kayelle----- another word lover! Not too many of us I bet.

I used to go to the library when a kid because it was in walking distance and because my parents, who were kind but strict, and limited the places I could go for 'fun'. So the library and art museums were my go-to places.

I would read that huge OED on a pedestal for hours. Too bad it didn't make me smart, but I sure got to know words.

Have you read Edwin Newman's Strictly Speaking?
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Old 01-04-2014, 03:31 PM   #49
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Lisa, I've been thinking more about "Quintessential American Food".

The one day of the year that nearly every American eats basically the same meal is Thanksgiving Day. It's a very big deal here and without going into the interesting history of the day, it revolves around a feast of roasted turkey, mashed potatoes with turkey pan gravy, bread or cornbread dressing, cranberry sauce, various family side dishes, and pumpkin pie. It just doesn't get more American than that.
In Canada it's celebrated on another day, but the meaning and feast are basically the same.



You've just described our Christmas Eve dinner. But we have roast potatoes instead of mash, and we don't do pumpkin pie. That is very American thanksgiving. My family in Europe do lamb or pork, but in South Africa turkey is very popular for Xmas.
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Old 01-04-2014, 03:56 PM   #50
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But in the UK they have almost the identical dish every Christmas Day and have been doing for centuries. The only difference is that they substitute Christmas pudding and mince pies for the pumpkin pie. Oh, and they ALWAYS have brussel sprouts, which are ALWAYS put on to boil in July. ;)
What, they don't do a "Christmas Goose"? I'm just now recovering from a Brit's recent thread about a Christmas brussel sprout quiche.

Some here do a repeat of the Thanksgiving feast on Christmas, but since the two holidays come within just a few weeks of one another, many people have a totally different Christmas dinner.
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