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Old 01-18-2012, 08:31 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
When I have made mayo in a blender, it wasn't as thick as store bought, but when I made with the mixer (the old kind, with two egg beater-like thingees), it was really thick - thicker than anything I ever bought at the store.
I agree. I don't make mayo often (and usually only as a tartar sauce for fish - yum) but I've never had a problem with thickness. I use an immersion blender with a whisk attachment and it whips up nice.

The problem I have is that it doesn't keep well. Once you put it in the fridge it starts to separate. But that's only because it doesn't contain carageenan and guar gum and all the stabilizer stuff they put into commercial mayo. That's fine. Just means I have to eat it all the sooner.
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Old 01-18-2012, 10:01 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Smooth and even is easy. That's not the issue.

Commercial mayo has a pudding-like texture beyond thickness that I haven't duplicated. To be honest, I haven't tried either. As I said, homemade mayo isn't worth the effort for a sandwich.
Nope, Hellmann's has that covered. I quit making mayo when I did the math and it was cheaper to buy it ready made. That was before the raw egg scare.
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Old 01-18-2012, 10:56 AM   #33
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The problem I have is that it doesn't keep well. Once you put it in the fridge it starts to separate. But that's only because it doesn't contain carageenan and guar gum and all the stabilizer stuff they put into commercial mayo. That's fine. Just means I have to eat it all the sooner.
Neither Duke's, Kraft, not Hellmann's contain carageenan or gum. What they do have is some calcium disodium as a preservative. It's commonly available as a supplement. I have no idea how much is effective as a preservative or if the commercial makers take other steps, such as using irradiated eggs. Keeping homemade mayo probably comes under the heading of experiments we leave to other people. But, as to thickness, there's no magic thickening ingredient in commercial mayo.
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Old 01-18-2012, 11:11 AM   #34
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Neither Duke's, Kraft, not Hellmann's contain carageenan or gum. What they do have is some calcium disodium as a preservative. It's commonly available as a supplement. I have no idea how much is effective as a preservative or if the commercial makers take other steps, such as using irradiated eggs. Keeping homemade mayo probably comes under the heading of experiments we leave to other people. But, as to thickness, there's no magic thickening ingredient in commercial mayo.
My assumption is that the "magic thickening" in commercial mayo involves cooking, since I don't believe they would be allowed to sell a raw egg product.

Interesting about the calcium disodium EDTA. Livestrong.com warns of some pretty serious drug interactions.

Dangers Of Calcium Disodium Edta | LIVESTRONG.COM
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Old 01-18-2012, 11:42 AM   #35
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They're talking about theraputic dosages and people taking it as a supplement, not warning of killer mayonnaise. It's sold as an OTC supplement as a chelating agent with a recommended daily dosage of 1 gram. I suspect that's more than the amount in a whole jar of mayonnaise. The regulatory limit for mayonnaise is 75 ppm. If I calculated properly, 16 fluid ounces of mayo = 32 tbsp. One tbsp is 14 grams (from jar label). So the jar is 448 grams. One millionth part is .000448 grams. 75 millions parts, then, is .0338 grams, or 3/100 of a gram. The one tbsp serving would then have about 1/1000 gram, in the range of ten grains of salt. I don't think I'll be fretting of that.
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Old 01-18-2012, 12:09 PM   #36
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Nevertheless, it's just this sort of food alchemy that leads me away from many commercial products. In the case of commercial mayo, I agree it sounds overall like the ingredients are mostly natural, but I don't think that many common food additives are as well researched as we would like to believe. They are generally added to make the product pretty or more shelf stable or whatever. It's not a tablespoon of mayonnaise here or there that I worry about. It's the cumulative effects of consuming chemicals over many years time.

But it's all a personal choice.
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Old 01-18-2012, 01:42 PM   #37
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Probably a financial choice for the both the maker and the consumer. It's clear from the number offered that it's perfectly feasible to produce commercial mayonnaise without preservatives. The maker acquires at least two liabilities, then. One is that their product will have a shorter sell date, making it more cumbersome for the retailer to stock. And retailers stock less of anything with short dates. So the retailer gets fewer quantity breaks, and the maker sells and ships less efficiently. That has to pass along to the consumer. Since people who are rabid about preservatives will generally pay the higher price, there's some give there. I suspect it's also about actual liability. Some people are going to be lax about maintaining refrigeration of the opened jar. The added preservative probably saves the maker considerable grief, both in claims for injury and in customers leaving the brand because they perceive it as not keeping well. A jar of mayonnaise lasts me a very long time.

And the labelled ingredients are only those the maker intentionally uses. The presence of medications and chemicals in eggs is more significant than tiny amounts of a preservative. And the toxic compounds in the individual ingredients are not listed on the mayonnaise label. You can easily alarm people about each mayonnaise ingredient, even the homemade variety. Of course, it's pretty easy to alarm some people about any food.
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Old 01-18-2012, 02:13 PM   #38
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By "personal choice", what I mean is I'll eat what I want and you can eat what you want. Deal?

If you like the commercial stuff then by all means enjoy. And by the same token, you aren't going to convince me otherwise. I'll continue to make my own. That is, after all, what this thread is about. So why try to start an argument?
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