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Old 03-22-2011, 08:44 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I, for one, could eat baked beans at every meal. I did last night.

Even though I've lived in Boston fir more than half my life, I still don't like a really heavy molasses bean.

And don't believe anyone that says not to add salt till the end if cooking. Salt doesn't inhibit softening
The need to salt at the end is because of evaporation. Salting just 20 minutes before the beans are done will result in too salty beans.

I learned it the hard way.
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Old 03-22-2011, 08:49 PM   #32
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Doesn't 40 litres of sap give 1 litre of syrup?
Yup--that's what they say. It takes about 24 hours to evap 40 liters to 1 liter of syrup. And it you don't watch it during the "finishing stage" you can end up with sugar--which is less than 1 liter of syrup.

Good news--the "lake" is now just a swamp. Only about 6-10 inches of water to wade through to reach the sap buckets.
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Old 03-22-2011, 08:51 PM   #33
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Swedish brown beans--taxlady, what kind of beans are used? Do you have a recipe for these?
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Old 03-22-2011, 08:57 PM   #34
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Ooooooh, yes, maple syrup is good! I often use molasses, which I failed to mention.
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Old 03-22-2011, 09:02 PM   #35
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I make mine similar to RockLobster BUT I use maple syrup (okay, I'm rubbing it in--we are evap'ing 40 liters of sap tonight...that is TODAY's haul from our 6 taps). The forge has been going 24/7 since yesterday.
I was supposed to help my father in law tap this past weekend at his place up near Algonquin Park. He went ahead and did it without me, so I guess I'll just head up tomorrow and help him where ever he needs me.
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Old 03-22-2011, 11:50 PM   #36
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Swedish brown beans--taxlady, what kind of beans are used? Do you have a recipe for these?
Never heard of them before, but apparently they are called, "bruna bönor". According to Swedish Wikipedia, they use "brown beans".



It says that outside of Sweden and Finland these beans are used a lot in the U.S., especially for "chile con carne".
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Old 03-23-2011, 08:00 AM   #37
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California Barking Spider, aka Arkansas Barking Spider, aka Michigan Deer Camp Buck Snort

See here: Definition of Barking Spider | The Online Slang Dictionary

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
AKA whistleberries
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Old 03-23-2011, 08:48 AM   #38
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The need to salt at the end is because of evaporation. Salting just 20 minutes before the beans are done will result in too salty beans.

I learned it the hard way.
The issue is proper seasoning. Food needs to be seasoned up front at the beginning of the cooking process and only adjusted at the end. Beans should be salted as they begin to cook.

There is a "kitchen myth" that salt prevents dry beans from softening. This isn't true.

Acid and old beans are the likely cause of beans not softening.

If one insists on salting at the end you won't end up with beans that are too salty -- like all cooking just salt to taste. But what you will end up with is a pot of beans that won't taste as good because the seasoning hasn't been cooked in.
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Old 03-28-2011, 12:03 PM   #39
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Just reporting back. Mine were fantastic! I boiled in plain water for an hour, drained and cooled for a couple hours (outside on the deck), then I simmered in the ham stock stuff I made the day before and let them absorb all that yummy goodness. At the end I tossed in a small tin of tomato paste, a handful of brown sugar and waved the molasses carton at the dutch oven. Then I chopped all the leftover ham (and crumbled the last of the bacon) and tossed it all in. Nirvana. They were without exception the best beans I've made.

I didn't realize that the soaking step could be replaced with boiling and cooling. This was MUCH better and my beans were uniformly soft and tender. Thanks everyone!
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Old 03-28-2011, 12:41 PM   #40
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Unfortunately, kidney beans are NOT Swedish brown beans. I assumed they were common in Denmark as well (maybe now that the bridge is built, they will become incorporated into Danish cooking...). Of course, having a recipe wouldn't help if I can't find a source for the beans <g>. Although, I see I can order them online. I am hoping I can find them in MN so I don't have to order 10 lb. I am already envisioning my re-entry into Canada with spices from The Spice House, wild rice, some of the Mexican food ingredients...good thing Porter Air allows two bags...one's going to be full of foodie stuff <g>.
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