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Old 01-03-2013, 11:19 PM   #21
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Broaden your mind, you can always use the ingredients for a snack or the next days meal. The pepper for example you could make a nice salad using it for lunch the next day or the egg whites to make a meringue for desert (pavlova, eton mess etc) or if it's the yolk use it for some holindaise sauce and make some eggs benedict for breakfast the next morning.

Or you could do some basic maths and round up your ingredients, whatever you don't use then freeze it or have it the next night aswell.
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Old 01-04-2013, 01:15 AM   #22
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While I'm ranting, why the heck aren't we on the metric system in the USA? Nothing could be easier to work with and is it really that hard to learn? It's the decimal system. If you can count money, you can use the metric system.
I couldn't agree more. It's one of my personal pet peeves. Back in the stone age when I was in grade school, we were taught the metric system with the expectation that it would be the law of the land in a few years.

Never happened. Some freakin' bureaucrat decided it was 1.) too hard/expensive to switch over and/or 2.) too "European" and since we're Amer'cans we shouldn't have to follow their lead.

But if people in this country would take the time to learn it, they would realize how simple and logical it is. How much does one liter of water weigh? Easy. One kilogram.

How much does a gallon of water weigh? Um....
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Old 01-04-2013, 02:45 AM   #23
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half the time, i have not got a recipe on paper. was taught -unless baking- that you base the result on flavor. that flavor changes during cooking, & usually needs to be adjusted during/after cooking.
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:25 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I couldn't agree more. It's one of my personal pet peeves. Back in the stone age when I was in grade school, we were taught the metric system with the expectation that it would be the law of the land in a few years.

Never happened. Some freakin' bureaucrat decided it was 1.) too hard/expensive to switch over and/or 2.) too "European" and since we're Amer'cans we shouldn't have to follow their lead.

But if people in this country would take the time to learn it, they would realize how simple and logical it is. How much does one liter of water weigh? Easy. One kilogram.

How much does a gallon of water weigh? Um....
In Canada we switched to metric, sort of. But, we live right next to a country that uses the US system of weights & measures.

So, when the ad, in Canada, tells me about fuel efficiency in MPG, is that US or Imperial gallons (the ones we used to use)?

I thought the US didn't go metric 'cause Reagan was too old to learn it.

And an Imperial gallon of water weighs 10lbs by definition.
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:19 AM   #25
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I usually use a recipe as inspiration or a guide on ratios. E.g., a recipe calls for 1/4 cup onion and 1/2 cup of cream, so I know I need twice as much cream as onion in the dish for the proper flavor profile but you'll never see me pull out measuring cups when I make it.

I'm sure it's not the case for every recipe, but I figure that most people aren't measuring things out when they come up with a recipe and only jot down measurements in approximation of what they made if it turns out well. I'm sure some folks will make a recipe several times and at least one of those times take the time and effort to carefully measure the ingredients for writing a recipe but honestly I think a lot of people are too lazy for that if they're not authoring a cookbook or running a restaurant. Or maybe that's just me. *shrug*

And to the above post: The US is in the process of metrication, but it's a long process. Though there are instances, such as when India did it a few decades ago, where everything just changed instantly by law on a set date. It's seen huge success there with that method but I think their culture is different than ours and accounts for their ease of adjustment whereas if America did it that way we'd probably panic. Though I can't qualify that last statement with any evidence.
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:29 AM   #26
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Quote:
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...How much does a gallon of water weigh? Um....
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
...And an Imperial gallon of water weighs 10lbs by definition.
A US gallon weighs 8.33 pounds.

How was the size of the Imp Gal determined? Did someone decide there should be a liquid measure equal to 10 pounds?
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Old 01-04-2013, 10:06 AM   #27
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A US gallon weighs 8.33 pounds.

How was the size of the Imp Gal determined? Did someone decide there should be a liquid measure equal to 10 pounds?
I think they did. It was already pretty close with a wine gallon.

The US gallon currently in use is the "Queen Anne gallon", which is what was in use in England, back in colonial times. The Brits just kept changing their gallons.
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